Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946

The exhibition showcases a previously unexplored body of the acclaimed photographer’s work, capturing an indelible view of World War II–era Pittsburgh

Four side by side images of Gordon Parks
Left to right: Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), “The cooper’s room where the large drums and containers are reconditioned. Here a workman lifts a drum from a boiling lye solution which has cleaned from it grease and dust particles.”, March 1944; “Two workmen pulling pans of red-hot grease that has just been poured from a cooking kettle. After it is cooled it can be lifted out in solid chunks and carried away on flat cars.”, March 1944; “A workman at the cooper plant.”, March 1944; “Harvey Turner, William Schwartz and William B. Wilson, grease makers.”, September 1946. Courtesy Gordon Parks Foundation.

Pittsburgh, PA (March 14, 2022) – From April 30 to August 7, 2022, Carnegie Museum of Art presents Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946, an in-depth presentation into Parks’s photographs of the Penola, Inc. grease plant in Pittsburgh and its workers who supplied essential goods to U.S. troops during World War II. This examination of an important chapter in Parks’s landmark career explores a narrative that is seldom told and still resonates today. The exhibition, which features more than 50 photographs that have not yet been seen by the public, will be paired with special programming, community events, and a publication featuring essays by artist LaToya Ruby Frazier and writer Mark Whitaker, among others.

By the early 1940s, Parks, a self-taught photographer who grew up in rural Kansas during segregation, had established himself as a photographer who freely navigated the fields of press and commercial photography with an unparalleled humanist perspective. It was at this time that Parks’s work caught the eye of Roy Stryker, who launched the documentary photography program at the U.S. Farm Security Administration. Stryker was soon hired by Standard Oil to capture the Penola grease plant as part of a public relations effort during World War II. In March 1944 and September 1946, Parks was tasked by Stryker to travel to Pittsburgh to photograph the plant, its workers, and the range of their activities manufacturing “Eisenhower grease,” a new, critical material that fueled U.S. troop efforts toward the end of World War II to defeat Nazi Germany. Parks’s visit coincided with the height of the plant’s productivity—at the time, it was nearly double that of its next-largest competitor, and it would ultimately produce nearly five million pounds of lubricant to support the country’s war effort. The resulting photographs—dramatically staged and lit, striking in their compositions— foreground the importance of the story of industry and war preparation in the U.S., which was a source of pride for the workers and people of Pittsburgh. Photographs in this exhibition will have visitors may recognize acquaintances, family members, or even themselves in these images.

Parks’s highly anticipated second visit to Pittsburgh in 1946 was covered by local newspaper. The Pittsburgh Courier, one of the nation’s most prominent Black newspapers, which sent its preeminent photographer, Charles “Teenie” Harris, to document the event. In 2001, Carnegie Museum of Art acquired Harris’s archive, which chronicles life in Pittsburgh from the 1930s through the 1970s. Among the more than 70,000 negatives are Harris’s pictures of Gordon Parks. Like Harris, Parks’s photographs during his time in Pittsburgh endure as a record of humanity and everyday life in the mid-20th century, telling countless stories that have been overlooked. Although Parks’s images of Penola, Inc. were intended as marketing tools to help humanize the corporation’s public image, his pictures speak to the importance of making individual experience visible. Parks’s documentation of workers divided by roles, race, and class is a snapshot of persistent issues in labor and industry. Far from an impassive observer, Parks wanted his photographs to convey meaning and help improve the lives of his subjects, many of whom were discriminated against because of their race. He would continue this approach in his next position as the first African American staff photographer at LIFE magazine.

Dan Leers, curator of photography at Carnegie Museum of Art says, “Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946 is a deep dive into an iconic photographer’s work during a momentous time in Pittsburgh. Through his photographs, Parks celebrated the lives of individual workers, capturing their skill, dedication, and camaraderie as they supplied materials for U.S. troops on the front lines during wartime. The poignancy and respect with which Parks photographed his subjects is breathtaking, unforgettable, and certainly resounding.”
This exhibition is made possible through a partnership between Carnegie Museum of Art and the Gordon Parks Foundation. Gordon Parks: Pittsburgh Grease Plant, 1944/1946, the accompanying catalogue published by Steidl that includes more than 100 previously unpublished photographs, will be available for purchase at stores.carnegiemuseums.org/carnegie-museum-of-art

In addition, the exhibition will be accompanied by the following programming:

May 19, 2022, at 6 p.m.
Exhibition Reception and Gordon Parks: Pittsburgh Grease Plant, 1944/1946 Book Launch Galleries and Carnegie Museum of Art Theater

Join Dan Leers, curator of photography at Carnegie Museum of Art, and Mark Whitaker, author
of Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance, for a conversation about the publication and exhibition. Event is pay what you wish to attend; register at CMOA.org/exhibition/gordon-parks.

May 26, 2022, at 6 p.m.
In Conversation: Neighbors
Scaife Galleries

How do we find ourselves when our histories are in an archive? With a focus on photographers Charles “Teenie” Harris and Gordon Parks, artist and co-founder of BOOM Concepts
DS Kinsel will facilitate a multigenerational conversation that contends with the experience of finding family members and community histories in the museum’s exhibitions and collections. Event is pay what you wish to attend; register at CMOA.org/exhibition/gordon-parks.

Learn more about at Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946 at: CMOA.org/exhibition/gordon-parks

Support
Support is provided by the Virginia Kaufman Fund and The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art.

Carnegie Museum of Art is supported by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Premier Partners
Fort Pitt Capital, Highmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, and Nova Chemicals

Health and Safety
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh has continued to follow government and public health guidance to keep staff and visitors safe. On February 25, 2022, The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) classified Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Washington, and Westmoreland counties as having low community infection levels. Considering this assessment and additional guidelines by the CDC, masks are optional for visitors to Carnegie Museums. Masks are available on-site if you should need one. Visitors experiencing COVID-19 symptoms are kindly asked to remain at home. To learn more about our Health and Safety measures, please visit cmoa.org/visit/health-safety.

Mission
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 34,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. In addition, the museum houses the archive of more than 70,000 images by Pittsburgh photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris, whose work comprises one of the most detailed and intimate records of Black life in America. Through its programming, exhibitions, and publications, Carnegie Museum of Art frequently explores the role of art and artists in confronting key social issues of our time, combining and juxtaposing local and global perspectives. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit CMOA.org.

For press inquiries, please contact: Elle Moody at Elle@suttoncomms.com:.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces First Round of Commissions and Partnerships for the 58th Carnegie International

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces
First Round of Commissions and Partnerships
for the 58th Carnegie International

terra0, James “Yaya” Hough, Rafael Domenech, Tony Cokes, and the Museo de la
Solidaridad Salvador Allende (MSSA) will participate in the 58th Carnegie International

Pittsburgh, PA (March 11, 2022)– Carnegie Museum of Art announces five commissions slated for the 58th Carnegie International that will be realized at the museum and throughout the city of Pittsburgh in the lead-up to the opening day of the exhibition on September 24, 2022. The 58th Carnegie International follows the geopolitical imprint of the United States since 1945 to situate the “international” within our local context. This framework prepares a historical ground for the movements of images, ideas, objects, and people that incite emancipatory expressions and artworks. The International attempts to encourage conversations around a range of actual and representational operations—migration, appropriation, expropriation, and decolonization—and address culture’s resistance to the disruptions and dislocations generated by these interventions and their lasting effects. The exhibition features historical presentations in dialogue with the museum’s collection and new commissions presented at the museum and a number of sites across the city of Pittsburgh. The 58th Carnegie International is organized by Sohrab Mohebbi, the Kathe and Jim Patrinos Curator, and associate curator Ryan Inouye with curatorial assistant Talia Heiman; the International Curatorial Council including Freya Chou, Renée Akitelek Mboya, Robert M. Ochshorn, and Pablo José Ramírez; and curatorial advisors Thiago de Paula Souza, Arlette Quỳnh-Anh Trần, and Renan Laru-an.

Among the highlights revealed, the museum has commissioned the Berlin-based collective terra0, “a
group of developers, artists, and researchers exploring the creation of hybrid ecosystems in the
technosphere.” For the Carnegie International, terra0 proposes an augmented tree that owns its
land. The Community College of Allegheny County in Pittsburgh is donating the land on which the tree will be planted, and the tree will regulate and govern itself through a smart contract and issue certificates of care to the museum for the services that the latter will provide during its lifetime. While this work responds to broader environmental concerns, it is particularly relevant in Pennsylvania, which lost a large percentage of its forest to the logging industry in the 19th and 20th centuries. terra0 was developed by Paul Kolling, Paul Seidler, and Max Hampshire at the Berlin University of the Arts in 2015 and has exhibited at the Berlin Schinkel Pavillon, the Shed NYC, Chronus Art Center Shanghai, and the 17th International Architecture Exhibition—La Biennale di Venezia, among others.

The museum has also invited Pittsburgh-born and based artist James “Yaya” Hough to paint a mural
for the Carnegie International in Pittsburgh’s historic Hill District, a cultural and artistic hub where Hough was born. Hough, in collaboration with Carnegie Museum of Art and Nafasi, a community development initiative in the Hill District that utilizes art as a vehicle, has been holding community workshops in the lead-up to the mural unveiling which will take place later this year. This project expands on and continues Yaya’s legacy of making art public to create common imaginaries. Hough has recently worked on several high-profile projects with Mural Arts Philadelphia; was featured in the seminal exhibition “Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration” at MoMA PS1 in 2020; and opened a solo show at JTT gallery in New York in May 2021. Hough is known for his drawings that augment the absurdity of authority and confinement, nine of which the museum recently acquired in 2021. A selection of Yaya’s works will be presented in the museum galleries during the Carnegie International.

Cuban American artist Rafael Domenech will kick start the summer 2022 season on June 4 with a pavilion housed in the museum’s sculpture courtyard. Taking the shape of an ellipse, the installation invokes Cuban poet Severo Sarduy who believed that the form represents a de-centering of knowledge production and expands intercultural elasticity. Made from everyday construction
scaffolding and mesh that are ubiquitous signs of urban redevelopment, the pavilion further
envelops the museum as a site of production. The work will serve as a venue for the second iteration of Inside Out, Carnegie Museum of Art’s summer outdoor event series that celebrates Pittsburgh’s rich cultural landscape with performances and artist-led workshops.

Artist Tony Cokes will create new work for the Carnegie International on four digital billboards on Route 28 in Pittsburgh in addition to a video installed at Carnegie Museum of Art. In Cokes’s
signature style, the artist creates text-based moving and still image works featuring texts over multichromatic color blocks, usually accompanied by the sound of pop, experimental, industrial, and electronic music. The texts are fragments of speeches, writings, and lyrics collected from a range of sources, including politicians, comedians, and cultural theorists addressing a range of topics including racism, evil, imperialism, megalomania, and capital. Cokes surrounds audiences in a field of distraction and disjunction, fracturing and remixing language oversaturated by color and beats. This new commission will disperse his work both in and out of the museum, taking on a decentralized structure. Cokes’s work is included in numerous group exhibitions such as the Whitney Biennial 2022.

In addition to commissioning new artwork and partnering with institutions in Pittsburgh, Carnegie
Museum of Art will also partner with international organizations to contextualize contemporary
voices. One such partner is the Museo de la Solidaridad Salvador Allende (MSSA), presenting a
selection of their extensive collection for the first time in the United States. Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2022, MSSA is a museum of modern and contemporary art in Chile with one of the most important collections in Latin America counting more than 2,800 artworks, a growing number thanks to the ongoing donations of works by the world’s most prominent artists. Its origins date to 1971 in Santiago, when a project arose to promote the donation of artworks from artistic circles in the Americas and Europe to Salvador Allende’s Unidad Popular (Popular Unity) government in order to create a museum for the people of Chile. Having gone from international solidarity through exile and back, MSSA is a distinctive example of artistic solidarity, generosity, and resilience and one of the world’s only major collections created exclusively from gifts by artists. “The framework we’ve explored for this edition of the Carnegie International attempts to take a step back and look at historical work in context with contemporary commissions to trace aesthetic currents, modes of expression and abstraction that are not recuperated by the canon of the contemporary,” says Sohrab Mohebbi, the Kathe and Jim Patrinos Curator of the 58th Carnegie International. “This dialogue allows us to defy conventions, recontextualize conversations, and emphasize on traditions of artistic solidarity and cultures of resistance.”

Eric Crosby, the Henry J. Heinz II Director of Carnegie Museum of Art, adds, “The Carnegie
International gives Carnegie Museum of Art the potential to transform itself against the background of American industry and history through collaboration with international curators, artists, and partners who engage with the museum through the show. Our team is thrilled to be working with such a wide ranging and globally expansive group of artistic voices that Mohebbi is bringing to the 58th Carnegie International, starting with key artist commissions and partnerships commencing this spring.”

About the Carnegie International
Established in 1896, the Carnegie International is the longest-running North American exhibition of international art. Organized every four years by Carnegie Museum of Art, the Carnegie International presents an overview of how art and artists respond to the critical questions of our time. The 58th Carnegie International, which will run from September 24, 2022 through April 2, 2023, brings together new commissions, existing works, and projects by established and emerging artists working internationally, domestically, and locally. The exhibition, which will be accompanied by a publication, will transform galleries and public spaces in the museum and occupy sites and engage publics in various Pittsburgh neighborhoods.

Since the first Carnegie International, the museum has acquired hundreds of works of art that have appeared in the exhibition series, including works by Josef Albers, Dara Birnbaum, Louise Bourgeois, Mary Cassatt, Nicole Eisenman, Isa Genzken, Dan Graham, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Mike Kelley, Ellsworth Kelly, Louise Lawler, Agnes Martin, Julie Mehretu, Joan Miró, Bruce Nauman, Chris Ofili, On Kawara, Sigmar Polke, Auguste Rodin, Doris Salcedo, John Singer Sargent, Hiroshi Sugimoto, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

Prizes awarded to Carnegie International artists include the Carnegie Prize for outstanding
achievement in the exhibition in the context of a lifetime of work, and the Fine Prize for an emerging artist in the exhibition.

Support
The 58th Carnegie International, presented by Bank of America, is made possible by leadership
support from Kathe and Jim Patrinos.

Major support is provided by the Carnegie International Endowment, The Fine Foundation, the Jill
and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and the Carnegie Luminaries.

Significant support is provided by Teiger Foundation, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Susan J. and Martin G. McGuinn Exhibition Fund, and the Keystone Members of the Carnegie
International.

The 58th Carnegie International has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the
Humanities.

Generous support is provided by The Heinz Endowments, the Heinz Family Foundation, the Louisa S.
Rosenthal Family Fund, and the Friends of the Carnegie International.

Additional support is provided by the Akers Gerber Foundation, Buchanan Ingersoll and Rooney, and
the Fans of the Carnegie International.

Carnegie Museum of Art is supported by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset
District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the
Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and
its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core
activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 34,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. In addition, the museum houses the archive of more than 70,000 images by Pittsburgh photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris, whose work comprises one of the most detailed and intimate records of Black life in America. Through its programming, exhibitions, and publications, Carnegie Museum of Art frequently explores the role of art and artists in confronting key social issues of our time, combining and juxtaposing local and global perspectives. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit CMOA.org

For press inquiries, please contact: Elle Moody at Elle@suttoncomms.com:.

Carnegie Museum of Art Presents Zoe Zenghelis: Fields, Fragments, Fictions

The exhibition marks the first solo exhibition of Zenghelis’s paintings in the United States

Zoe Zhengelis Walking City
Zoe Zheneglis Walking City

Zoe Zhengelis Happiness
Zoe Zhengelis Happiness

Pittsburgh, PA (February 16, 2022) – Carnegie Museum of Art announces Zoe Zenghelis: Fields, Fragments, Fictions, the first solo exhibition featuring the paintings of artist and educator Zoe Zenghelis in the United States. Opening March 26 and on view through July 24, 2022, the monographic show will celebrate the interdisciplinary breadth of Zenghelis’s art practice by bringing her independent work in dialogue with her collaborative projects and teaching methods, as well as with objects from the museum’s permanent collection. The exhibition will be staged in the galleries of the Heinz Architectural Center at Carnegie Museum of Art, one of the nation’s foremost institutes for the study and curation of architecture. Zenghelis together with Theodossis Issaias, Associate Curator, Heinz Architectural Center, and Hamed Khosravi, architect and educator at the Architectural Association School of Architecture have collaborated at every step of the way to select and present this important body of work.

Born in Athens in 1937, Zoe Zenghelis studied stage design and painting in London, where she has lived and worked since the late 1950s. In 1975, Zenghelis—alongside architects Rem Koolhaas and Elia Zenghelis and artist Madelon Vriesendorp—co-founded the architectural practice Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA). OMA’s early projects were realized through images as visual manifestos and provocations that offered a polemical critique to the discipline of architecture. Instead of a single totalizing vision of the city, OMA celebrated the multiplicity of metropolitan life and the surrealism of the everyday. This collaborative work and Zoe Zenghelis’s approach to artmaking redefined the visual culture of architecture and opened new possibilities for thinking about space and the built environment through the medium of painting. Zenghelis collaborated with Vriesendorp to transpose this exploration into a teaching method at the Color Workshop, an experimental course they taught together at the Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA) in London from 1982 until 1993. By fostering a studio culture based on play and discovery, they cultivated the spatial imagination of students and challenged established conventions of architectural representation.

For more than 60 years, Zenghelis’s practice has remained consistent. With thick layers of paint, abstract geometries, assemblies of forms, and eruptive color palettes, she meticulously composes pictorial surfaces on stretched canvas or card. Populated with building fragments, abstract tectonics, and metropolitan landscapes, Zenghelis’s paintings construct worlds of imagination and fiction. From seductive metropolitan formations and dystopian landscapes to floating buildings and cityscapes of disturbing stillness, the poetics of Zenghelis are an inquiry to the city and its architecture. “My paintings became influenced by my architectural experiences, but they work differently as conceptual views of my own world of images,” says Zenghelis. “My affinity with architecture is thematic and goes into a genre that could be called pure fiction. The straight rendering gets reduced to conceptual elements that are of a different nature; they are in a state of dematerialization to enter the world of imagination.”

Zoe Zenghelis: Fields, Fragments, Fictions will be anchored by four narratives and areas of practice. These include: the artist’s independent projects from 1982 to today (“Cities of Our Choice”); Zenghelis’s work as a teacher and a learner (“Spaces of Learning”); the urban projects of OMA and the modes of collaboration and creative exchange between the four founding members (“Metropolitan Affairs”); and the lesser-known projects of OMA in the Mediterranean islands in relation to Zenghelis’s long-standing engagement with landscape paintings of her homeland, Greece (“Arcadias Inverted”). The show is punctuated with objects from the museum’s permanent collection, selected by the artist to situate her work in a constellation of influences and relations between her students, friends, and teachers—real or imaginary.

“Zenghelis, with determination and poetic force, brings wonder and imagination into the discipline of architecture,” adds Theodossis Issaias and Hamed Khosravi. “Tectonic plates are carried away by clouds, cities walk on idle fields, and buildings are suspended from the sky. If they appear more elusive, it is to disguise Zoe Zenghelis’s urgent question: how will we create the Cities of Our Choice’?”

In celebration of the exhibition, Carnegie Museum of Art will host a series of programs and panels.
• April 30, 2022, at 10 a.m.—1 p.m. Workshop: HomeScapes—Cities, Color, Belonging. Multidisciplinary practitioner, architect, filmmaker, and educator, Sarah Akigbogun will lead an interactive design workshop. The workshop is co-presented with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture. $15 – Space is limited, please register in advance. Fee includes museum admission.
• April 30, 2022, at 1:30 p.m.—3 p.m. Gallery Meet and Greet. Join us in the gallery for informal tours and a conversation guided by the artist Zoe Zenghelis and the organizers of the show, Theodossis Issaias and Hamed Khosravi. This event is free with museum admission.
• April 30, 2022, at 3 p.m.—5 p.m. In Conversation: Zoe Zenghelis. Join artist Zoe Zenghelis in a roundtable conversation with Theodossis Issaias, Hamed Khosravi, and multidisciplinary practitioner Sarah Akigbogun. Zenghelis will discuss her artistic process, educational methods, and tensions and potentials of collaborative work and collective authorship as a co-founding member of the architectural firm Office for Metropolitan Architecture. A reception at the Café Carnegie at Carnegie Museum of Art will follow. The event is co-presented with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and coincides with the 75th Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians in Pittsburgh. This event is free.

More information about Zoe Zenghelis. Fields, Fragments, Fictions and its events can be found at https://cmoa.org/exhibition/zoe-zenghelis/

Support
The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art is supported by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Premier Partners
Highmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Nova Chemicals, and Fort Pitt Capital

Health and Safety
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh has continued to follow government and public health guidance to keep staff and visitors safe. To prevent the spread of COVID- 19 in areas with high transmission, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strongly recommends that every person—vaccinated and unvaccinated—wear a mask when inside public spaces. For that reason, all visitors aged 2 and above are required to wear masks while inside our museums, and our staff members and volunteers will be wearing masks too. Visitors experiencing COVID-19 symptoms are kindly asked to remain at home. To learn more about our Health and Safety measures, please visit cmoa.org/visit/health safety.

Mission
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 34,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. In addition, the Museum houses the archive of more than 70,000 images by Pittsburgh photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris, whose work comprises one of the most detailed and intimate records of Black life in America. Through its programming, exhibitions, and publications, Carnegie Museum of Art frequently explores the role of art and artists in confronting key social issues of our time, combining and juxtaposing local and global perspectives. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit For press inquiries, please contact: Elle Moody at Elle@suttoncomms.com:.

Carnegie Museum of Art presents Working Thought

35 contemporary artists and filmmakers consider economic inequality and labor in a new group exhibition opening March 5 and running through June 26, 2022

L-R: Martin Wong, Ten Brooklyn Storefronts, from the Sunset Park Series (detail), 1985, acrylic on canvas, in 10 parts, 18 x 14 in. Courtesy P.P.O.W. and a private collector

Margarita Cabrera, Space in Between (detail), 2019, Border Patrol uniform fabric, copper wire, thread, and terracotta pot. Courtesy of the artist and Talley Dunn Gallery.

Jill Freedman, Hands Like a Shawl, 1968, gelatin silver print, 11 x 14 in. Courtesy of the Jill Freedman Estate

L-R: Martin Wong, Ten Brooklyn Storefronts, from the Sunset Park Series (detail), 1985, acrylic on canvas, in 10 parts, 18 x 14 in. Courtesy P.P.O.W. and a private collector. Margarita Cabrera, Space in Between (detail), 2019, Border Patrol uniform fabric, copper wire, thread, and terracotta pot. Courtesy of the artist and Talley Dunn Gallery. Jill Freedman, Hands Like a Shawl, 1968, gelatin silver print, 11 x 14 in. Courtesy of the Jill Freedman Estate

Pittsburgh, PA (February 2, 2022) – From March 5 to June 26, 2022, Carnegie Museum of Art presents Working Thought, a major group exhibition that examines that examines the role of contemporary artists to consider and question the many ways economic inequality and labor have shaped American life past and present. Curated by Eric Crosby, the museum’s Henry J. Heinz II Director, Working Thought showcases contemporary artwork across media and generations, highlighting connections between diverse artistic practices. Through various programs, the exhibition provides a platform for discussion, inviting museum visitors to reflect on their own lived experiences through the works on view. A film series, presenting the work of five filmmakers, will also be an integral part of the exhibition.

Working Thought features works by 35 established and mid-career contemporary artists and filmmakers, including Fred Lonidier, who merges strategies of conceptual photography with activism; Margarita Cabrera, whose work invites the collaboration and involvement of immigrant communities; and Jessica Jackson Hutchins, whose kiln-fused glass works respond to contemporary social issues, in addition to works by Theaster Gates, Rodney McMillian, Jessica Vaughn, Andrea Bowers, and many others.

A combination of new commissions and loans are presented alongside works from the museum’s collection, positioning the collection in a new light and within the context of the history of Pittsburgh as a capital of industry. Many recent acquisitions on display will be on view at the museum for the first time, including Jaune Quick-to-See Smith’s Trade Canoe: The Surrounded (2018) and works by Cameron Rowland, Moyra Davey, and Jill Freedman. The exhibition probes the connections between art, economy, and labor within the larger historical relationship between Carnegie Museum of Art, Andrew Carnegie, and the city of Pittsburgh. The museum’s origins can be traced to 1886 with Andrew Carnegie’s initial concept: a museum that would “bring the world” to the people of Pittsburgh, particularly those who worked in the steel magnate’s empire. Traces of this dedication to industry and toil can still be seen today in John White Alexander’s mural The Crowning of Labor surrounding the 1907 Grand Staircase. “Carnegie Museum of Art is a readymade frame for Working Thought, and the exhibition is intended to take root here in site-specific ways. When I moved to Pittsburgh in 2015, I was struck by how present the city’s deep history of industry was not only in the built environment but also in the museum itself,” says Eric Crosby. “I hope the diverse range of artists and artworks featured in Working Thought will provide multiple points of entry into the timely and relevant social issues that the show addresses, shedding light on the power of art to challenge our most deeply seated assumptions.”

As part of Working Thought, five independent films will be screened in the Carnegie Museum of Art Theater. Each film will be introduced by a local expert whose background engages with the topic of that film. Screening dates and times and film names and directors are as follows:

• March 17, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. American Factory (2019) — directed by Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert
• April 9, 2022, at 1:30 p.m. Killer of Sheep (1978) — directed by Charles Burnett
• April 28, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. Harlan County, USA (1976) — directed by Barbara Kopple
• May 21, 2022, at 1:30 p.m. Lightning Over Braddock: A Rustbowl Fantasy (1988) — directed
by Tony Buba
• June 16, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. Welfare (1975) — directed by Frederick Wiseman

A May Day (International Workers’ Day) celebration will also accompany the exhibition and provide a platform for discussion on art’s capacity to illuminate and reframe past and present conditions of economic inequality and labor. On April 21, 2022, from 6–8 p.m. in the museum’s Hall of Architecture and throughout the Working Thought galleries, various artists and the museum’s curators will come together for a public celebration of the exhibition. The evening will feature contemporary interpretations of work songs by regional musicians. On April 23, 2022, beginning at 10:30 a.m., artists in the exhibition, in partnership with community organizations, will lead public artmaking workshops throughout the museum in preparation for May Day. There will also be docent-led tours throughout the run of the exhibition as part of the museum’s ongoing Date with a Docent program for visitors. The exhibition will also include an In Conversation series of events taking place featuring special guest speakers at Carnegie Museum of Art’s Theatre. This series will also be live streamed for virtual audiences to enjoy:

• Thursday, March 10, 6:00 p.m. In Conversation: Curators with Meg Onli, Director and Curator of the Underground Museum in Los Angeles. Meg and fellow curators will discuss how museums can learn from artists whose work has transformative impacts.
• Saturday, April 23, 3:30 p.m. In Conversation: Artists with Pittsburgh-based artist Naomi Chambers. Naomi and participating artists of Working Thought will discuss how artists lead conversations about labor and economy and what relationships artists create and sustain between their art practices and the communities in which they live and work.
• Saturday, May 7, 2:00 p.m. In Conversation: Siblings with artist Carmen Winant and historian Gabriel Winant. Carmen and Gabriel will address the complexities and contradictions of domestic and feminized labor as seen through photography in their respective work.

More information about Working Thought and its events can be found at cmoa.org/exhibition/working-thought.

Support
Significant support for the exhibition is provided by Kathe and Jim Patrinos, the Susan J. and Martin G. McGuinn Exhibition Fund, and the Virginia Kaufman Fund.

Generous support is provided by Brian Wongchaowart, with additional support from the Ford Family Foundation, Nancy and Woody Ostrow, and The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art. Support for curatorial research has been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. a platform for discussion on art’s capacity to illuminate and reframe past and present conditions

Carnegie Museum of Art is supported by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Premier Partners
Fort Pitt Capital, Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield, and NOVA Chemicals.

Health and Safety
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh has continued to follow government and public health guidance to keep staff and visitors safe. To prevent the spread of COVID- 19 in areas with high transmission, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strongly recommends that every person—vaccinated and unvaccinated—wear a mask when inside public spaces. For that reason, all visitors aged 2 and above are required to wear masks while inside our museums, and our staff members and volunteers will be wearing masks, too. Visitors experiencing COVID-19 symptoms are kindly asked to remain at home. To learn more about our Health and Safety measures, please visit cmoa.org/visit/health-safety.

Mission
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 34,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. In addition, the Museum houses the archive of more than 70,000 images by Pittsburgh photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris, whose work comprises one of the most detailed and intimate records of Black life in America. Through its programming, exhibitions, and publications, Carnegie Museum of Art frequently explores the role of art and artists in confronting key social issues of our time, combining and juxtaposing local and global perspectives. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit CMOA.org.

For press inquiries, please contact: Elle Moody at Elle@suttoncomms.com:.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces 2022 Exhibitions

The 2022 program features surveys of work by Gordon Parks and Zoe Zenghelis and a contemporary group show that explores labor and economic inequality in America. Engaging with themes of American industry through local and national lenses, the 2022 exhibition program ushers in the 58th Carnegie International, which will explore the geopolitical footprint of the United States since 1945.


L-R: Zoe Zenghelis, Shapes in Space, 1992, oil on canvas, 45 × 55 cm. Private Collection.


Gordon Parks, Workmen in the Power House, 1944, Gelatin silver print, printed, 2021, 10 × 8 in. The Gordon Parks Foundation.


Margarita Cabrera, from Space in Between, Border Patrol uniform fabric, copper wire, thread and terracotta pot. Image courtesy of the artist and Talley Dunn Gallery.

Pittsburgh, PA (December 1, 2021) – Carnegie Museum of Art announces its 2022 season with exhibitions leading up to the 58th Carnegie International. Each exhibition probes local concerns and national histories within the broader context of the world today, as part of the museum’s wider vision to present the work of living artists while engaging with the collection. The group exhibition Working Thought, opening March 3, examines the ways in which contemporary artists have explored labor and economic inequality in America in their work across media. Opening on March 26 in the Heinz Architectural Center is Zoe Zenghelis, a solo presentation of paintings by artist and founding member of OMA (Office for Metropolitan Architecture). Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946, opening on April 30, highlights an important chapter in Parks’s landmark career when he traveled to Pittsburgh to photograph World War II efforts at the Penola Grease Plant. On September 24, the Carnegie International, North America’s oldest exhibition of contemporary art, will return to Pittsburgh for its 58th edition.

Working Thought, March 5 – June 26, 2022
Bringing together works from the museum’s collection alongside new commissions and loans, Working Thought examines the many ways contemporary artists have engaged with the critical issues of labor, class, and economic inequality that have shaped American life past and present. Working Thought will include over 30 featured artists, including Fred Lonidier, who merges strategies of conceptual photography with activism; Margarita Cabrera, whose work invites the collaboration and involvement of immigrant communities; and Jessica Jackson Hutchins, whose kiln-fused glass works respond to contemporary issues, in addition to works by Theaster Gates, Cameron Rowland, Rodney McMillian, Jessica Vaughn, Andrea Bowers, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, and many others. As part of this show, Carnegie Museum of Art will present public programs that further connect art and labor with May Day (International Workers Day). On April 21, 2022, from 6–9 p.m. in the Hall of Architecture and throughout the exhibition galleries, artists and curators will come together in dialogue with visitors and regional musicians will perform contemporary interpretations of work songs. On April 23, 2022, beginning at 10 a.m. in the Hall of Sculpture, artists in the exhibition will be partnered with local community organizations for collaborative art making in preparation for May Day. More information about these events will be forthcoming in 2022 on CMOA.org. Working Thought is curated by Eric Crosby, Carnegie Museum of Art’s Henry J. Heinz II Director.

Zoe Zenghelis, March 26 – July 24, 2022
This solo exhibition celebrates Zenghelis’s work at the intersection of painting and spatial imagination. The painting survey, a first for the museum’s Heinz Architectural Center, brings into dialogue her independent painting practice with the collaborative projects of the architectural firm, OMA, and the teaching methods that she developed as an art educator. Her practice has defied disciplinary classifications, resulting in works populated with buildings, fragments, and abstract tectonics that construct worlds of imagination and longing. Seductive metropolitan formations blended into dystopian landscapes, floating buildings captured in disturbing stillness, and idle fields merged with urban grids— Zenghelis’s work offers a contemplative critique of the built environment and a way of thinking about space through the medium of painting. A programmatic highlight of this show will be a roundtable discussion and gallery tours open to the public, taking place on April 30, 2022 at 10:30 a.m. The discussion will revolve around the topic of spatial imagination and painting and take place in Carnegie Museum of Art’s theater with the curatorial team, artist, and contributors to the exhibition publication. Prior to and after the roundtable, exhibition tours will be offered to event attendees, led by the curatorial team. Registration for this event will be forthcoming in early 2022 on CMOA.org. Zoe Zenghelis is curated by Theodossis Issaias, associate curator of the Heinz Architectural Center and Hamed Khosravi, architect and educator at the Architectural Association School of Architecture.

Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946, April 30 – August 7, 2022
Through Parks’s recently rediscovered photographs of Pittsburgh workers, this exhibition provides an insightful view of World War II–era America that still resonates today. In March 1944 and September 1946, Gordon Parks traveled to Pittsburgh on assignment for the public relations department of the Standard Oil Company to photograph the Penola Grease Plant. An established photographer known for his unparalleled humanist perspective, Parks was tasked with photographing the plant, its workers, and the range of their activities manufacturing lubricants to support U.S. military efforts during World War II. The resulting photographs—dramatically staged and lit, striking in their compositions—endure as an insightful interpretation of World War II–era America. Photographs in this exhibition will have specific relevance for members of the Pittsburgh community; local visitors might recognize acquaintances, friends, or even family members in these images. The exhibition will be paired with special programming and community events to spark engagement with this unexplored body of Parks’s photographs of the Steel City, with additional information forthcoming in early 2022 on CMOA.org. The exhibition and its accompanying publication have been made possible through a partnership between Carnegie Museum of Art and the Gordon Parks Foundation. Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946 is curated by Dan Leers, curator of photography at Carnegie Museum of Art.

58th Carnegie International, September 24 – April 2, 2023
The 58th Carnegie International is North America’s longest-running survey of contemporary art in America and Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition since 1896. With every edition of the exhibition, Carnegie Museum of Art has the potential to transform itself through collaboration with international curators, artists, and partners that engage with the museum. The International positions Carnegie Museum of Art as a leading global museum and historical laboratory for exhibition-making as a tool to engage with pressing concerns of the time. Curated by Sohrab Mohebbi, the Kathe and Jim Patrinos Curator of the 58th Carnegie International, alongside a Pittsburgh-based curatorial team and an international curatorial council, the exhibition addresses the question of international from the local context of the United States. Carnegie Museum of Art will be announcing commissions, special projects, and participating artists on a rolling schedule starting in Spring 2022.

Support
Carnegie Museum of Art is supported by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Premier Partners
Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield and NOVA Chemicals.

Health and Safety
Since the start of COVID-19 pandemic, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh has continued to follow government and public health guidance to keep staff and visitors safe. To prevent the spread of the COVID-19 Delta variant in areas with high transmission, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strongly recommends that every person—vaccinated and unvaccinated—wear a mask when inside public spaces. For that reason, all visitors aged 2 and above are required to wear masks while inside our museums, and our staff members and volunteers will be wearing masks, too. Visitors experiencing COVID-19 symptoms are kindly asked to remain at home. To learn more about our Health and Safety measures, please visit cmoa.org/visit/health-safety.

Mission
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 34,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. In addition, the museum houses the archive of more than 70,000 images by Pittsburgh photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris, whose work comprises one of the most detailed and intimate records of Black life in America. Through its programming, exhibitions, and publications, Carnegie Museum of Art frequently explores the role of art and artists in confronting key social issues of our time, combining and juxtaposing local and global perspectives. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit CMOA.org.

For press inquiries, please contact: Elle Moody at Elle@suttoncomms.com:.