Carnegie Museum of Art Hires New Department Heads in Advance of 125th Anniversary and 58th Carnegie International

Carnegie Museum of Art Appoints Four New Department Heads in Advance of 125th Anniversary and 58th Carnegie International

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces four new additions to the museum’s senior leadership team: Chris Fry as Director of Finance, Stefanie Mohr as Director of Marketing & Engagement, Clarissa Morales as Director of Collections & Exhibitions Management, and Jason Segreti as Director of Visitor Services. These four appointments underscore a pivotal time for the museum, as it prepares to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh later this year and produce the next iteration of the Carnegie International, the oldest exhibition of international contemporary art in North America, in 2022.

“It’s an exciting time to have Chris, Stefanie, Clarissa, and Jason join our senior leadership team at the museum,” explains Eric Crosby, The Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art. “They are accomplished professionals in their respective areas of expertise and trusted, strategic leaders. As we look to the future of the museum, including the milestone moments we have ahead of us, their diverse experience and their passion for our mission will be instrumental. I’m thrilled to welcome them to the staff.”

A man wearing a blue suit and glasss smiles with crossed arms

Director of Finance Chris Fry. Photo: Bryan Conley


Director of Finance Chris Fry most recently served as the Senior Financial Analyst at Management Science Associates and has over 15 years of financial planning and budgeting experience in a variety of industries. Fry also serves as treasurer of the board of directors for Pittsburgh Center for Arts and Media. As Director of Finance for CMOA, he is responsible for fiscal management of the museum and serves as a critical link between the museum and the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh financial team. Fry holds a bachelor of arts in business management from Asbury University in Kentucky.

A woman with shoulder-length hair and pink lipstick smiles

Director of Marketing & Engagement Stefanie Mohr. Photo: Bryan Conley


Director of Marketing & Engagement Stefanie Mohr most recently served as Assistant Vice President, Head of Corporate Communications for the Consumer Products Division at L’Oréal in New York City. Prior to her work at L’Oréal, Mohr worked for Glamour Magazine, Target, and The Estee Lauder Companies, Inc. in a variety of brand and corporate markeeting and communications roles. As Director of Marketing & Engagement, Mohr plays a central role in managing the museum’s audience outreach efforts, including public relations, social media, advertising, and community engagement opportunities. Mohr, who grew up in Pittsburgh, holds an MBA from Fordham University as well as a BA in business and a BM in Music Theatre from Baldwin-Wallace University.

A woman wearing a suit jacket and red lipstick smiles in front of a colorful artwork

Director of Exhibitions and Collections Management Clarissa Morales


Director of Collections & Exhibitions Management Clarissa Morales joins the museum from the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University in California where she served as Director of Collections, Conservation, & Exhibitions. Prior to her time at the Cantor, Morales served as Exhibition Project Manager at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art where she was instrumental in managing the reinstallation of the museum’s new facility in 2016. She also brings prior experience from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art to her role at Carnegie Museum of Art. She holds a BA in philosophy with a minor in art history from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

A man wearing a dark blue suit and a beard smiles with his arms crossed

Director of Visitor Services Jason Segreti. Photo: Bryan Conley


Director of Visitor Services Jason Segreti has worked within the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburgh organization for more than 15 years. He most recently served as Manager of Museum Services and has also held roles on the security team, where he was responsible for training, overseeing, and scheduling security officers in the Oakland building and served as a first responder to medical emergencies. Segreti is a Pittsburgh native and holds a bachelor of science in business administration from the University of Pittsburgh.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. The museum champions creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces New Interdisciplinary Program on Photography, Surveillance, and Artificial Intelligence

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces New Interdisciplinary Program on Photography, Surveillance, and Artificial Intelligence

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—In January 2020, Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) launches Mirror with a Memory: Photography, Surveillance, and Artificial Intelligence,the third iteration of the Hillman Photography Initiative (HPI) committed to exploring new ideas about photography. The initiative will present an exhibition of work by Trevor Paglen, a scholarly publication, and an interdisciplinary convening that is free and open to the public.

How are images utilized to gather data on our daily activities? With the development and advancement of artificial intelligence (AI), there has been a radical change in the way that surveillance systems capture, categorize, and synthesize photographs. Mirror with a Memory explores the many ways artists probe the intersections of photography, surveillance, and AI—their past, present, and future—to underscore concerns about implicit bias, right to privacy, and police monitoring embedded in corporate, military, and law enforcement applications.

“Photography has been used to surveil and police humans since the second half of the 19th century,” says Dan Leers, curator of photography, who is organizing the initiative. “Today, the vast majority of pictures are made by one machine for another machine to analyze in order to gather data on our movements and actions and determine our likes and dislikes. While there are many useful functions of AI, it also has more nefarious implications.” Mirror with a Memory considers how artists contribute to this ongoing discourse and add essential nuance to debates about the value of AI in our lives.

Museum staff have collaborated with a Creative Team to help shape the theme and programmatic elements of the third iteration of HPI. The team, led by Leers, includes Simone Browne, Associate Professor of African and Diaspora Studies at University of Texas at Austin; Jimena Canales, a historian of science based in Boston; David Danks, L.L. Thurstone Professor of Philosophy and Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh; Trevor Paglen, an interdisciplinary artist based in Berlin and New York City; and Ben Wizner, Director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project in New York City.

Mirror with a Memory is comprised of three programs that offer many opportunities for audiences to contemplate art’s role in questioning photography’s function within AI and surveillance technologies. On the weekend of March 21, 2020, CMOA will host a convening consisting of screenings, performances, and conversations between artists, scholars, technologists, and creative thinkers. Each session will take photography and its relationship to AI and surveillance as the point of departure for discussions of important topics including drones and aerial surveillance, bias and AI, borders and migration, and advocacy and disruption, among others.

Trevor Paglen, Agathla Peak, Hough Transform; Haar, 2018, silver gelatin LE print, 60 x 48 in. © Trevor Paglen. Courtesy of the artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco

Opening July 25, 2020, CMOA will present an exhibition of work by Trevor Paglen that will be on view through January 10, 2021. The presentation will include a new site-specific commission as well as existing work that reveals how AI analyzes and labels photographs of people and places. These works will be placed in three areas within the museum, inviting visitors to encounter Paglen’s artistic perspective in different contexts.

“One of the things that I think artists can contribute to the conversation around AI is looking at the relationships between images and labels in terms of how training data is put together,” Paglen remarks. “Artists can question the assumptions that are built into the images that are feeding these systems, the ways in which those images are classified, and what those systems ultimately purport to represent.”

Set for release in December 2020, a new publication will take the form of an illustrated reader. It will contain new scholarship, original translations of historical texts, relevant case law, and commissioned artworks. Topics discussed in the book include the history and present state of biometric, aerial, and behavioral surveillance and how artists have used their work to expose and disrupt these systems.

Mirror with a Memory is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography, with Taylor Fisch, project curatorial assistant.

To learn more about the program, visit the website.


About the Hillman Photography Initiative

The Hillman Photography Initiative (HPI) connects Carnegie Museum of Art with audiences to exchange new ideas about photography. By collaborating with partners in and beyond the museum, the Initiative is an incubator for new art and ideas rooted in photography and responsive to society at large.

Since its inception in 2013, HPI has produced dynamic new artworks, exhibitions, publications, online experiences, and conversations transforming our relationship to the photographic medium.

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces a Season of Socially Responsive Exhibitions

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces a Season of Socially Responsive Exhibitions

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—In 2020 Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) welcomes a dynamic range of exhibitions that explore the many ways artists respond to their social, cultural, and ecological contexts. This ambitious season presents visitors with opportunities to consider the ongoing and sometimes ambiguous role of the artist in some of the most crucial conversations of our time.

“Artists have always been vital contributors to debates in our public sphere,” says Eric Crosby, The Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art. “Whether channeling political attitudes of the moment or creating space for conversation, artists contribute essential nuance and complexity to the issues that shape our present moment. How cultural institutions will embrace them and foster their work is a challenge for our century.”

CMOA’s upcoming calendar begins with the opening of a new dedicated space in the permanent collection galleries for the Charles “Teenie” Harris Archive, as well as a rotating gallery for photographs and works on paper. Read on to discover what lies in store for the museum’s visitors.

A young boy sits in a boxing ring with boxing gloves on, smiling at the camera

Charles “Teenie” Harris, Little boy boxer seated in boxing ring, ca. 1945, Carnegie Museum of Art, Teenie Harris Archive

Teenie Harris Gallery
Scaife Galleries
January 25, 2020–ongoing

CMOA is thrilled to announce the creation of a dedicated gallery for the Teenie Harris Archive. This space will feature iconic examples of Harris’s photographs and host a number of educational programs and community events inspired by this world-renowned collection.

Harris—who was a photographer for The Pittsburgh Courier, one of the nation’s most influential black newspapers—created an unparalleled chronicle of African American history and culture during the mid-twentieth century. As both a member and documentarian of the black community, Harris remains an iconic figure in Pittsburgh to this day. With this installation, the museum celebrates Harris’s legacy and looks forward to creating opportunities for creative collaboration with local partners.

The Teenie Harris Gallery is organized by Dominique Luster, archivist, and Charlene Foggie-Barnett, archive specialist, Teenie Harris Archive.

Photography and Works on Paper Gallery
Scaife Galleries
January 25, 2020–ongoing

Adjacent to the Teenie Harris Gallery, Carnegie Museum of Art also debuts a dedicated space for the presentation of photography and works on paper from the permanent collection. Inaugurating this space will be a selection of recent acquisitions in photography, on view through June 14, 2020. Featuring 25 works acquired over the past four years, the installation will highlight new and significant additions to the collection by artists including Ansel Adams, James Casbere, Nona Faustine, Vivian Maier, and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

This installation is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography, and Hannah Turpin, curatorial assistant for modern and contemporary art and photography.

A row of houses set behind a low wall with a colorful mural.

Christine Holtzer and Lauren S. Zadikow, 50 Greenspace Dumpsites, Forest Way, Site #2 (detail). Courtesy of the artists

Counterpressures
Forum Gallery
February 21–July 26, 2020

The 83rd installation of CMOA’s Forum series presents a thematic group exhibition that addresses the present urgency of global warming. The title, taken from a quotation in Pittsburgh environmentalist Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962), identifies the show’s specific focus on the fraught relationship between human impact and environmental response.

This exhibition features new and existing work by ten Pittsburgh-based artists who are acknowledging the transitory state of our environment, the ecological, economic, and public health consequences on the horizon, and how these conditions intersect with their own lived experiences. Through their selections of materials, the use of data and documentation, their surrealist imaginings, or references to urban development and disconnection from nature, these works grapple with the eclogical present and its uncertain future.

Counterpressures has been developed in partnership with the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh, the oldes continuously-exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. Artists include Allison Blair, Paper Buck, Seth Clark, Tara Fay Coleman, Christine Holtz, Stephanie Martin, Travis Mitzel, Njaimeh Njie, Su Su, and Ginger Brooks Takahashi.

Counterpressures is organized by Hannah Turpin, curatorial assistant for modern and contemporary art and photography.

Major funding for the Forum series is generously provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation.

An-My Lê, Untitled, Ho Chi Minh City, from the series Viêt Nam, 1995, gelatin silver print. Courtesy the artist. © An-My Lê

An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain
Heinz Galleries
March 14–July 26, 2020

Carnegie Museum of Art presents the first comprehensive survey of the work of photographer An-My Lê (American, born Vietnam, 1960). Featuring photographs from each of the artist’s major bodies of work, An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain creates connections across Lê’s career and provides unprecedented insight into her subtle, evocative images, which draw on traditions of landscape photography to explore the complexity of war and conflict.

Born in the midst of the Vietnam War, Lê vividly remembers the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in a war zone. She and her family were evacuated by the US military in 1975. It would take another 20 years for Lê to return to her homeland, this time with a large-format camera in tow. Since then, she has spent nearly twenty-five years recording the impact of the military on people, the landscape, and cultural memory.

The exhibition features selections from each of Lê’s seven series, including works from her latest series, Silent General, on view for the first time.

An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography. Major support for this exhibitio is provided by Lannan Foundation, Philip and Edith Leonian Foundation, and The Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund. Additional support is provided by The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art.

The Fabricated Landscape
Heinz Architectural Center
May 9–September 13, 2020

This exhibition presents work by ten architectural practices from around the world, each represented by three projects that range from single houses to projects that operate at the scale of the natural terrain and urban infrastructure. All of these projects exhibit a sensibility toward the larger world to which they belong and contribute.

Each of these practices looks anew at architecture’s need to communicate with and augment the public sphere. These architects approach urban intervention and landscape with an alertness to sociopolitical issues and a renewed appreciation of craft. Several of the projects are specific to postindustrial communities and the Global South. Many of the objects have not been exhibited previously in the United States.

The Fabricated Landscape features projects by Assemble (England), Frida Escobedo (Mexico), Go Hasegawa and Associates (Japan), Studio Anna Heringer (Germany), Studio Anne Holtrop (Bahrain), LCLA office (Colombia/Norway), MAIO (Spain), OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen (Belgium), SO–IL (USA), and UMWELT (Chile).

This exhibition is organized by Raymund Ryan, curator, Heinz Architectural Center.

Support for this exhibition was provided by the Drue Heinz Trust, which also provides generous support for the operations and other programs of the Heinz Architectural Center.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Celebrate the Holiday Season at Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History

Celebrate the Holiday Season at Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History

Contacts
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Sloan MacRae
Carnegie Museum of Natural History
macraes@carnegimnh.org
412.353.4678

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History announce the return of beloved holiday traditions, from family-friendly events to seasonal parties, that make the museums a favorite winter destination.

The popular Carnegie Trees display, presented by the Women’s Committee, returns to Carnegie Museum of Art this year with the theme of “Artfully Inspired.” Five massive Colorado Spruce trees will be trimmed with decorations inspired by favorite artworks from the museum’s collection. The display opens with a celebration hosted by the Women’s Committee on Wednesday, December 4.

A visit to Carnegie Museum of Art’s Neapolitan presepio, one of the finest nativity scenes of its kind, has been a Pittsburgh holiday favorite since 1957. Handcrafted between 1700 and 1830, the lifelike figures in the presepio recreate the nativity within a vibrant and detailed panorama of 18th-century Italian village life. The presepio will be on view from December 1, 2019, through January 12, 2020.

A close view of holiday decorations on a glittering evergreen tree.

Installation view of the Carnegie Trees display, Carnegie Museum of Art. Photo: Tom Little

By visitor demand, National Geographic returns to Carnegie Museum of Natural History with 50 extraordinary images of animals in nature. 50 Greatest Wildlife Photographs exemplifies the publication’s unmatched legacy of artistic, scientific, and technical achievement and provides a perfect complement to a visit to the museum’s acclaimed wildlife halls.

Both museums will be closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day, but will be open during normal visiting hours for the rest of the season. Read on to learn more about upcoming holiday programs.

A large nativity scene on a green-clothed table in front of a plaster architectural cast.

Installation view of the Neapolitan presepio, ca. 1700–1830, Carnegie Museum of Art. Photo: Bryan Conley

Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA)

Art Chat: A Delight for the Senses: The Still Life
Daily, 12:15–12:45 p.m.
Free with admission
Examine the beauty of the still life genre through a casual chat with a docent in this exhibition.

Art Chat: Neapolitan presepio
Daily, drop in 1–3 p.m.
Free with admission
Explore the Neapolitan presepio, a 17th and 18th century nativity scene, in the Hall of Architecture and learn its history from a docent.

ART TIL 8
Thursdays, 5–8 p.m.
50% off admission
Grab a friend and kick-start your weekend! Explore the galleries, see live performances, and create handmade gift wrap. Visit the CMOA and CMNH stores for special discounts.

ARTventures
Weekends, 11:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Also December 26, 27, 30, and 31
Free with admission
Celebrate the season together as you tell a story of winter-themed art in the galleries by arranging words in front of artworks. Perfect for families.

Story Sundays
December 1 and 15, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Free with admission
Cozy up and enjoy listening to a winter-themed story, explore related works in the galleries, then create your own artwork to take home. Perfect for families.

Winter Wonderland
December 13, 7–10 p.m.
$25 (Members: $20)
Get fancy and come have fun at your art museum! Snap snazzy photos, dance under snowflakes, craft holiday keepsakes, get cozy in our galleries, and create memories with friends during this 21+ event.

Winter Wonderland Pajama Party
December 14, 5–7 p.m.
Adults: $10; Kids 3–12: $5; Kids under 3: Free
Grab your best holiday pajamas and meet at the museum! Jam out in your jammies at a family dance party, take holiday photos, make gifts, eat cookies, and enjoy story time in the galleries.

A group of kids smile and laugh, posing next to oversize plastic ladybugs.

Kids enjoy Super Science Saturday at Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Elf on the Shelf
Andy the Elf returns to the museum on December 1! Follow the adventures of our Elf on the Shelf on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook all month long. Don’t forget to behave when you visit the museum—we want andy to say only good things to Santa!

Letters to Santa
November 29–December 30
Free with admission
Send your letters to Santa from the museum! Look for Sven, our friendly reindeer, in Discover Basecamp, where he watches over the mailbox and ushers your letters to Santa Claus.

Star Wars After Dark
December 6, 6–10 p.m.
$15 online; $20 at the door (Members: $13.50)
A long, long time ago in a museum on Forbes Avenue…Star Wars After Dark became the best holiday party in town! Embrace the chill of the Hoth-like Polar World, find out what Ewoks and Wookiees have in common with mammals, and sip on festive cocktails. Costumes encouraged!

Super Science Saturday: Holidays Around the World
December 14, noon–4 p.m.
Free with admission
Travel around the world as you explore holiday-themed stations throughout the museum. Learn about holiday traditions from many cultures through amazing artifacts, festive holiday foods, and hands-on crafts at this family event.

Sensory-Friendly Saturday: Holidays Around the World
December 28, 8:30–10 a.m.
Adults: $9.95 (Seniors: $7.50, Kids: $5.95, Kids under 2: Free)
The museum will open its galleries early for a sensory-friendly holiday celebration! Visit stations throughout the museum to learn about holiday traditions from many cultures through amazing artifacts, festive artifacts, and more. Say hello to Sven, our friendly reindeer!

Shop at the Museums

Museum Store Sunday
December 1, 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m.
No admission required
Shop with us and support your museums! Members receive 25% off regularly priced purchases and non-members receive 20% off purchases over $50. The CMOA Store offers free gift wrap from 11 a.m.–2 p.m.

Extra Shopping Day
December 17, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
No admission required
Finish up your holiday shopping at the CMOA and CMNH stores! The museums are closed, but the shops will stay open and feature special discounts.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Experience the Whimsy of Lina Bo Bardi’s Drawings at Carnegie Museum of Art

Experience the Whimsy of Lina Bo Bardi’s Drawings at Carnegie Museum of Art
Exhibition in the Heinz Architectural Center Highlights Bo Bardi’s Creative Practice

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Lina Bo Bardi Draws
November 22, 2019–March 29, 2020
Heinz Architectural Center

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is thrilled to present an exhibition exploring the drawing practice of famed 20th-century architect Lina Bo Bardi. Lina Bo Bardi Draws brings together a selection of nearly 100 drawings, ranging from Bo Bardi’s early life to the end of her career, from more than 6,000 drawings in her extensive archives in São Paulo.

Bo Bardi was a prolific and idiosyncratic designer. Born in Italy, she was educated in Rome and worked in the Milan studio of the Modernist architect Gio Ponti. Bo Bardi moved to Brazil in 1946, where her interest in local materials and practices enriched her Modernist approach to design. Her most notable projects include the Museu de Arte in São Paulo (MASP) and SESC Pompeia, a factory rehabilitated into a cultural center, also in São Paulo. Her creative work extended far beyond architecture, incorporating furniture and jewelry design, theatrical design, teaching, curating, and architectural criticism.

The exhibition invites visitors to explore the importance of drawing to this influential architect’s design process and built work. Completed in a variety of media—pencil, watercolor, gouache, felt pen, pen and ink—the drawings reveal Bo Bardi’s broad view of design and architecture as accessible to everyone, nurtured by her interest in nature and everyday life.

A colorful mixed media artwork showing the inside of a building, two people walking down a pathway, and colorful banners on the ceiling.

Lina Bo Bardi, Study for furniture design at Milan Triennale (detail), ca. 1946, Courtesy of INSTITUTO BARDI / CASA DE VIDRO

“Drawing, with its slow and intimate gestures, was her way of dwelling in the world,” writes curator Zeuler R. Lima, PhD, in his introduction to Lina Bo Bardi Drawings (Princeton University Press, 2019). “Drawing conveyed, at the tip of her hands, a representational purpose and also a somewhat magical realism spell.”

A version of this exhibition, also curated by Lima, appeared at the Fundacío Joan Miró in Barcelona as Lina Bo Bardi Drawing from February to May 2019.

Lina Bo Bardi Draws is curated by Zeuler R. Lima and brought to the museum by the Heinz Architectural Center.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.