Carnegie Museum of Art to Reopen and Welcome Visitors on June 29

Carnegie Museum of Art to Reopen and Welcome Visitors on June 29

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) has announced it will reopen to the public on June 29, 2020, after a period of closure that began March 14 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The museum is reopening with CDC recommended safety protocols and timed ticketing in place, along with a new 2020 exhibition calendar, to warmly welcome visitors, staff, and volunteers. The museum invites Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh members a couple days early, starting on June 26.

“I am elated to reopen our doors and welcome the entire community into our museum,” says Eric Crosby, the Henry J. Heinz II Director. “Since we temporarily closed, our team has been working diligently to create an environment that is safe and welcoming for our visitors, staff, and volunteers. We want each person visiting the art museum to feel comfortable and confident that they will have a positive and meaningful experience as they connect with their favorite artworks and CMOA friends.”

Health & Safety
To protect visitors, staff, and volunteers, the museum has updated its health and safety procedures. It will be limiting admissions to 25% of building capacity through required timed ticketing for all visitors; clearly marking foot-traffic patterns in high-traffic areas; enhancing cleaning protocols; modifying interactive areas; providing additional hand sanitizer stations; and installing plexiglass shields at visitor services desks. Visitors, staff, and volunteers over the age of two will be required to wear masks and encouraged to practice safe social distancing by keeping six feet apart (visitors may stay close to their own group but should stay six feet away from other groups and individuals). The museum is also designating special hours for those visitors who are at a higher risk for severe illness due to age (65+) or a medical condition on Wednesday mornings from 10 a.m.–noon.

Discounts—including college student, Access card, and active military—will be available for visitors on a walk-up basis; eligible visitors are asked not to purchase a timed ticket but to request a discount from a Visitor Services staff member upon arrival at the museum.

At the Museum
While at CMOA, visitors can enjoy two on-site exhibitions that have been extended, in addition to the museum’s vast permanent collection and In Sharp Focus: Charles “Teenie” Harris. The first exhibition, Counterpressures, which will extend through January 3, 2021, features ten Pittsburgh-area artists who examine the fraught relationship between humans and the environment. The second exhibition, An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain, the largest career-spanning survey of Vietnamese American photographer An-My Lê, will extend through January 18, 2021; earlier this year, this exhibition was described by acclaimed art critic Nancy Princenthal as “revelatory” in The New York Times.

Online
While CMOA is opening its doors, it will continue providing robust, inspiring online content and interactive programming for everyone who enjoys experiencing CMOA from home. Every three months, CMOA will continue sharing artworks as part of its new online exhibition series, which kicked off May 20 with Rachel Rose: Lake Valley. Every week, the museum will offer virtual programs and events, and every day, art-related content will be shared via the museum’s websiteemail, and InstagramTwitter, and Facebook feeds.

Upcoming Exhibitions
Trevor Paglen: Opposite Geometries
Various Galleries
September 4, 2020–March 14, 2021

The third iteration of the Hillman Photography Initiative (HPI), a CMOA project committed to exploring new ideas about photography, launches this year. The initiative will present an exhibition of work by artist Trevor Paglen, a publication, and an interdisciplinary podcast.

With the development and advancement of artificial intelligence (AI), there has been a radical change in the way that surveillance systems capture, categorize, and synthesize photographs. Mirror with a Memory explores the many ways artists probe the intersections of photography, surveillance, and AI—their past, present, and future—to underscore concerns about implicit bias, right to privacy, and police monitoring embedded in corporate, military, and law enforcement applications.

The exhibition will include a new site-specific commission as well as a sculpture that doubles as a WiFi hotspot and photographs that reveal how AI analyzes and labels photographs of people and places. These works will be placed in three areas within the museum, inviting visitors to encounter Paglen’s insightful perspective in different contexts.

Trevor Paglen: Opposite Geometries is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography, with Taylor Fisch, project curatorial assistant.

Locally Sourced
Charity Randall Gallery
November 20, 2020–March 27, 2022

Pittsburgh has a long tradition of artisans and industry. Today it is home to a growing cohort of independent designers and makers working in traditional media such as clay, glass, metal, fiber, wood, and paper, and with emergent materials and technologies. Locally Sourced: Contemporary Pittsburgh Products highlights new work by some of the region’s most talented artists and makers of functional goods and furnishings.

These are the producers who are creating opportunities—developing their craft into a business. These are the innovators who are reinventing traditional handwork processes and manufacturing technologies to transform raw and reclaimed materials into products that have utility, durability, and good design. These are the locally sourced.

Locally Sourced is organized by Alyssa Velazquez, curatorial assistant for Decorative Arts & Design.

Carnegie Museum of Art Launches New Exhibition Series Dedicated to the Museum’s Film & Video Collection with Rachel Rose: Lake Valley on May 20

Carnegie Museum of Art Launches New Exhibition Series Dedicated to the Museum’s Film & Video Collection with Rachel Rose: Lake Valley on May 20

Pittsburgh, PA—For the first time in its history, Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) launches a new, online exhibition series dedicated to the museum’s film and video collection. This extension of the museum’s curatorial program into the digital sphere offers a new channel for local and global audiences to experience time-based works previously only accessible in person. With this initiative, CMOA is revolutionizing how visitors can engage with its significant holdings at a time when most cultural institutions are closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“We are all looking for opportunities to be inspired and find solace and comfort during this challenging time,” says Eric Crosby, the museum’s Henry J. Heinz II Director. “In order to serve our visitors in new ways that are meaningful to them, we must fundamentally rethink the traditional museum experience. Regardless of whether our doors are open or closed, there should be countless opportunities for our digital audiences to experience and interpret art.”

A lushly illustrated landscape with a sulking animal in the foreground

Rachel Rose, Still from Lake Valley, 2016, Carnegie Museum of Art. Courtesy the artist. © Rachel Rose

The new exhibition series debuts on May 20 with Lake Valley, an eight-minute video work by Rachel Rose (American, b. 1986) lauded for its inclusion in the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018, and the 2017 Venice Biennale. With this visually rich, animated video, Rose mines themes and imagery from 19th- and 20th-century children’s literature to create a dream-like story about loneliness, imagination, and longing for personal connection. Debuting online while the museum’s doors remain closed due to COVID-19, this timely digital presentation brings the comfort and inspiration of art directly into the homes of museum visitors.

“I’m happy and honored to have Lake Valley shown as the inaugural video work in this new series presented by Carnegie Museum of Art, and I’m looking forward to seeing other works I might not have otherwise been able to see,” said Rachel Rose.

Rachel Rose: Lake Valley is accompanied by family-friendly educational activities that explore the themes of the work and invite close looking. On July 15, families will be invited to join a free online drawing session inspired by Rose’s process. On August 5, Rose will be joined by Crosby for a free online discussion about her work, its themes, and the way her creative process has shifted while sheltering in place. The exhibition will conclude with a commissioned essay in the museum’s award-winning online journal, Storyboard, before closing on August 16, 2020.

Future iterations of the series will draw from the museum’s historically significant film and video collection, which is comprised of nearly 1,000 works. The Department of Film and Video was among the first of its kind when it opened in 1970 as a three-year venture led by Sally Dixon, eventually growing into a full-fledged department that garnered national and international attention. In its first twenty years, the department worked with more than 150 artists including Stan Brakhage, Robert Breer, Joan Jonas, Carolee Schneemann, Hollis Frampton, Roger Jacoby, Bruce Conner, Freude Bartlett, and Yvonne Rainer. The Department of Film and Video was incorporated into the museum’s department of modern and contemporary art in 2003.

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Eric Crosby Named Director of Carnegie Museum of Art

Eric Crosby Named Director of Carnegie Museum of Art

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh announced today that Eric Crosby has been appointed The Henry J. Heinz II Director of Carnegie Museum of Art. Previously the Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Crosby became the museum’s acting director in January 2019. He will assume his role as director starting March 1.

“Eric has a deep commitment to the mission of Carnegie Museums and a clear understanding of what it will take to build on the distinctive strengths of Carnegie Museum of Art,” said Steven Knapp, president and CEO of Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh. “He was widely recognized as a creative and insightful curator before becoming acting director, and over the past year he has proven his ability to lead the museum’s talented staff as they lay the groundwork for the museum’s future. I look forward to supporting his efforts and benefiting from his advice in the months and years to come.”

Since joining the museum in 2015, Crosby has organized a number of significant exhibitions, including 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art, a collaborative group exhibition that considered the state of American identity and politics through the lenses of two major museum collections in dialogue. Crosby has also managed the museum’s Forum series, which presents the work of emerging and established artists, most recently Ruth Root, Ian Cheng, Michael Williams, and Alison Knowles.

Prior to the opening of the 2018 Carnegie International, Crosby oversaw a complete transformation of the museum’s postwar and contemporary galleries. Crossroads: 1945 to Now mines the depth and diversity of the collection by illuminating the critical role of the artist in everyday life. His curatorial work has left an indelible mark on the museum’s collection through a series of celebrated acquisitions, such as Kerry James Marshall’s Untitled (Gallery) (2016), Joan Brown’s The Room, Part 1 (1975), and major works from the 2018 Carnegie International, including works by the British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, the interdisciplinary collective Postcommodity, and Pittsburgh sculptor Thaddeus Mosley. In his role as acting director since early 2019, Crosby has been instrumental in reimagining the museum’s artistic program, in particular as the museum prepares for the next iteration of the Carnegie International, which will launch in 2022.

“I am deeply honored to take on the permanent role of director at Carnegie Museum of Art,” said Crosby. “For nearly 125 years, the museum has presented significant artworks from across the globe and inspired visitors through its exhibitions and collections as well as through the Carnegie International, the oldest and most prestigious survey of contemporary art in the United States. In this new chapter, I will continue to champion curatorial projects and educational initiatives that provoke critical conversations about our world and respond to the key social issues of our time, driving forward our team’s desire to redefine the role of art museums in the 21st century.”

“Eric has such passion for the museum, the city of Pittsburgh, and the greater arts community,” said Ellen Kessler, a Carnegie Museums life trustee and chair of the Carnegie Museum of Art Advisory Board. “He has proven to be an inspiring and engaging leader, and our advisory board is excited to continue working with and supporting Eric and his team as they lead the museum forward.”

Prior to joining Carnegie Museum of Art in 2015, Crosby was associate curator of visual arts at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He received his BA from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and an MA from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Hires New Department Heads in Advance of 125th Anniversary and 58th Carnegie International

Carnegie Museum of Art Appoints Four New Department Heads in Advance of 125th Anniversary and 58th Carnegie International

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces four new additions to the museum’s senior leadership team: Chris Fry as Director of Finance, Stefanie Mohr as Director of Marketing & Engagement, Clarissa Morales as Director of Collections & Exhibitions Management, and Jason Segreti as Director of Visitor Services. These four appointments underscore a pivotal time for the museum, as it prepares to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh later this year and produce the next iteration of the Carnegie International, the oldest exhibition of international contemporary art in North America, in 2022.

“It’s an exciting time to have Chris, Stefanie, Clarissa, and Jason join our senior leadership team at the museum,” explains Eric Crosby, The Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art. “They are accomplished professionals in their respective areas of expertise and trusted, strategic leaders. As we look to the future of the museum, including the milestone moments we have ahead of us, their diverse experience and their passion for our mission will be instrumental. I’m thrilled to welcome them to the staff.”

A man wearing a blue suit and glasss smiles with crossed arms

Director of Finance Chris Fry. Photo: Bryan Conley


Director of Finance Chris Fry most recently served as the Senior Financial Analyst at Management Science Associates and has over 15 years of financial planning and budgeting experience in a variety of industries. Fry also serves as treasurer of the board of directors for Pittsburgh Center for Arts and Media. As Director of Finance for CMOA, he is responsible for fiscal management of the museum and serves as a critical link between the museum and the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh financial team. Fry holds a bachelor of arts in business management from Asbury University in Kentucky.

A woman with shoulder-length hair and pink lipstick smiles

Director of Marketing & Engagement Stefanie Mohr. Photo: Bryan Conley


Director of Marketing & Engagement Stefanie Mohr most recently served as Assistant Vice President, Head of Corporate Communications for the Consumer Products Division at L’Oréal in New York City. Prior to her work at L’Oréal, Mohr worked for Glamour Magazine, Target, and The Estee Lauder Companies, Inc. in a variety of brand and corporate marketing and communications roles. As Director of Marketing & Engagement, Mohr plays a central role in managing the museum’s audience outreach efforts, including public relations, social media, advertising, and community engagement opportunities. Mohr, who grew up in Pittsburgh, holds an MBA from Fordham University as well as a BA in business and a BM in Music Theatre from Baldwin-Wallace University.

A woman wearing a suit jacket and red lipstick smiles in front of a colorful artwork

Director of Exhibitions and Collections Management Clarissa Morales


Director of Collections & Exhibitions Management Clarissa Morales joins the museum from the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University in California where she served as Director of Collections, Conservation, & Exhibitions. Prior to her time at the Cantor, Morales served as Exhibition Project Manager at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art where she was instrumental in managing the reinstallation of the museum’s new facility in 2016. She also brings prior experience from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art to her role at Carnegie Museum of Art. She holds a BA in philosophy with a minor in art history from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

A man wearing a dark blue suit and a beard smiles with his arms crossed

Director of Visitor Services Jason Segreti. Photo: Bryan Conley


Director of Visitor Services Jason Segreti has worked within the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburgh organization for more than 15 years. He most recently served as Manager of Museum Services and has also held roles on the security team, where he was responsible for training, overseeing, and scheduling security officers in the Oakland building and served as a first responder to medical emergencies. Segreti is a Pittsburgh native and holds a bachelor of science in business administration from the University of Pittsburgh.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. The museum champions creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces New Interdisciplinary Program on Photography, Surveillance, and Artificial Intelligence

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces New Interdisciplinary Program on Photography, Surveillance, and Artificial Intelligence

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—In January 2020, Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) launches Mirror with a Memory: Photography, Surveillance, and Artificial Intelligence,the third iteration of the Hillman Photography Initiative (HPI) committed to exploring new ideas about photography. The initiative will present an exhibition of work by Trevor Paglen, a scholarly publication, and an interdisciplinary convening that is free and open to the public.

How are images utilized to gather data on our daily activities? With the development and advancement of artificial intelligence (AI), there has been a radical change in the way that surveillance systems capture, categorize, and synthesize photographs. Mirror with a Memory explores the many ways artists probe the intersections of photography, surveillance, and AI—their past, present, and future—to underscore concerns about implicit bias, right to privacy, and police monitoring embedded in corporate, military, and law enforcement applications.

“Photography has been used to surveil and police humans since the second half of the 19th century,” says Dan Leers, curator of photography, who is organizing the initiative. “Today, the vast majority of pictures are made by one machine for another machine to analyze in order to gather data on our movements and actions and determine our likes and dislikes. While there are many useful functions of AI, it also has more nefarious implications.” Mirror with a Memory considers how artists contribute to this ongoing discourse and add essential nuance to debates about the value of AI in our lives.

Museum staff have collaborated with a Creative Team to help shape the theme and programmatic elements of the third iteration of HPI. The team, led by Leers, includes Simone Browne, Associate Professor of African and Diaspora Studies at University of Texas at Austin; Jimena Canales, a historian of science based in Boston; David Danks, L.L. Thurstone Professor of Philosophy and Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh; Trevor Paglen, an interdisciplinary artist based in Berlin and New York City; and Ben Wizner, Director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project in New York City.

Mirror with a Memory is comprised of three programs that offer many opportunities for audiences to contemplate art’s role in questioning photography’s function within AI and surveillance technologies. On the weekend of March 21, 2020, CMOA will host a convening consisting of screenings, performances, and conversations between artists, scholars, technologists, and creative thinkers. Each session will take photography and its relationship to AI and surveillance as the point of departure for discussions of important topics including drones and aerial surveillance, bias and AI, borders and migration, and advocacy and disruption, among others.

Trevor Paglen, Agathla Peak, Hough Transform; Haar, 2018, silver gelatin LE print, 60 x 48 in. © Trevor Paglen. Courtesy of the artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco

Opening July 25, 2020, CMOA will present an exhibition of work by Trevor Paglen that will be on view through January 10, 2021. The presentation will include a new site-specific commission as well as existing work that reveals how AI analyzes and labels photographs of people and places. These works will be placed in three areas within the museum, inviting visitors to encounter Paglen’s artistic perspective in different contexts.

“One of the things that I think artists can contribute to the conversation around AI is looking at the relationships between images and labels in terms of how training data is put together,” Paglen remarks. “Artists can question the assumptions that are built into the images that are feeding these systems, the ways in which those images are classified, and what those systems ultimately purport to represent.”

Set for release in December 2020, a new publication will take the form of an illustrated reader. It will contain new scholarship, original translations of historical texts, relevant case law, and commissioned artworks. Topics discussed in the book include the history and present state of biometric, aerial, and behavioral surveillance and how artists have used their work to expose and disrupt these systems.

Mirror with a Memory is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography, with Taylor Fisch, project curatorial assistant.

To learn more about the program, visit the website.


About the Hillman Photography Initiative

The Hillman Photography Initiative (HPI) connects Carnegie Museum of Art with audiences to exchange new ideas about photography. By collaborating with partners in and beyond the museum, the Initiative is an incubator for new art and ideas rooted in photography and responsive to society at large.

Since its inception in 2013, HPI has produced dynamic new artworks, exhibitions, publications, online experiences, and conversations transforming our relationship to the photographic medium.

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.