Media Archive: Heinz Architectural Center

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces a Season of Socially Responsive Exhibitions

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces a Season of Socially Responsive Exhibitions

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—In 2020 Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) welcomes a dynamic range of exhibitions that explore the many ways artists respond to their social, cultural, and ecological contexts. This ambitious season presents visitors with opportunities to consider the ongoing and sometimes ambiguous role of the artist in some of the most crucial conversations of our time.

“Artists have always been vital contributors to debates in our public sphere,” says Eric Crosby, The Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art. “Whether channeling political attitudes of the moment or creating space for conversation, artists contribute essential nuance and complexity to the issues that shape our present moment. How cultural institutions will embrace them and foster their work is a challenge for our century.”

CMOA’s upcoming calendar begins with the opening of a new dedicated space in the permanent collection galleries for the Charles “Teenie” Harris Archive, as well as a rotating gallery for photographs and works on paper. Read on to discover what lies in store for the museum’s visitors.

A young boy sits in a boxing ring with boxing gloves on, smiling at the camera

Charles “Teenie” Harris, Little boy boxer seated in boxing ring, ca. 1945, Carnegie Museum of Art, Teenie Harris Archive

Teenie Harris Gallery
Scaife Galleries
January 25, 2020–ongoing

CMOA is thrilled to announce the creation of a dedicated gallery for the Teenie Harris Archive. This space will feature iconic examples of Harris’s photographs and host a number of educational programs and community events inspired by this world-renowned collection.

Harris—who was a photographer for The Pittsburgh Courier, one of the nation’s most influential black newspapers—created an unparalleled chronicle of African American history and culture during the mid-twentieth century. As both a member and documentarian of the black community, Harris remains an iconic figure in Pittsburgh to this day. With this installation, the museum celebrates Harris’s legacy and looks forward to creating opportunities for creative collaboration with local partners.

The Teenie Harris Gallery is organized by Dominique Luster, archivist, and Charlene Foggie-Barnett, archive specialist, Teenie Harris Archive.

Photography and Works on Paper Gallery
Scaife Galleries
January 25, 2020–ongoing

Adjacent to the Teenie Harris Gallery, Carnegie Museum of Art also debuts a dedicated space for the presentation of photography and works on paper from the permanent collection. Inaugurating this space will be a selection of recent acquisitions in photography, on view through June 14, 2020. Featuring 25 works acquired over the past four years, the installation will highlight new and significant additions to the collection by artists including Ansel Adams, James Casbere, Nona Faustine, Vivian Maier, and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

This installation is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography, and Hannah Turpin, curatorial assistant for modern and contemporary art and photography.

A row of houses set behind a low wall with a colorful mural.

Christine Holtzer and Lauren S. Zadikow, 50 Greenspace Dumpsites, Forest Way, Site #2 (detail). Courtesy of the artists

Counterpressures
Forum Gallery
February 21–July 26, 2020

The 83rd installation of CMOA’s Forum series presents a thematic group exhibition that addresses the present urgency of global warming. The title, taken from a quotation in Pittsburgh environmentalist Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962), identifies the show’s specific focus on the fraught relationship between human impact and environmental response.

This exhibition features new and existing work by ten Pittsburgh-based artists who are acknowledging the transitory state of our environment, the ecological, economic, and public health consequences on the horizon, and how these conditions intersect with their own lived experiences. Through their selections of materials, the use of data and documentation, their surrealist imaginings, or references to urban development and disconnection from nature, these works grapple with the eclogical present and its uncertain future.

Counterpressures has been developed in partnership with the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh, the oldes continuously-exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. Artists include Allison Blair, Paper Buck, Seth Clark, Tara Fay Coleman, Christine Holtz, Stephanie Martin, Travis Mitzel, Njaimeh Njie, Su Su, and Ginger Brooks Takahashi.

Counterpressures is organized by Hannah Turpin, curatorial assistant for modern and contemporary art and photography.

Major funding for the Forum series is generously provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation.

An-My Lê, Untitled, Ho Chi Minh City, from the series Viêt Nam, 1995, gelatin silver print. Courtesy the artist. © An-My Lê

An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain
Heinz Galleries
March 14–July 26, 2020

Carnegie Museum of Art presents the first comprehensive survey of the work of photographer An-My Lê (American, born Vietnam, 1960). Featuring photographs from each of the artist’s major bodies of work, An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain creates connections across Lê’s career and provides unprecedented insight into her subtle, evocative images, which draw on traditions of landscape photography to explore the complexity of war and conflict.

Born in the midst of the Vietnam War, Lê vividly remembers the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in a war zone. She and her family were evacuated by the US military in 1975. It would take another 20 years for Lê to return to her homeland, this time with a large-format camera in tow. Since then, she has spent nearly twenty-five years recording the impact of the military on people, the landscape, and cultural memory.

The exhibition features selections from each of Lê’s seven series, including works from her latest series, Silent General, on view for the first time.

An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography. Major support for this exhibitio is provided by Lannan Foundation, Philip and Edith Leonian Foundation, and The Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund. Additional support is provided by The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art.

The Fabricated Landscape
Heinz Architectural Center
May 9–September 13, 2020

This exhibition presents work by ten architectural practices from around the world, each represented by three projects that range from single houses to projects that operate at the scale of the natural terrain and urban infrastructure. All of these projects exhibit a sensibility toward the larger world to which they belong and contribute.

Each of these practices looks anew at architecture’s need to communicate with and augment the public sphere. These architects approach urban intervention and landscape with an alertness to sociopolitical issues and a renewed appreciation of craft. Several of the projects are specific to postindustrial communities and the Global South. Many of the objects have not been exhibited previously in the United States.

The Fabricated Landscape features projects by Assemble (England), Frida Escobedo (Mexico), Go Hasegawa and Associates (Japan), Studio Anna Heringer (Germany), Studio Anne Holtrop (Bahrain), LCLA office (Colombia/Norway), MAIO (Spain), OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen (Belgium), SO–IL (USA), and UMWELT (Chile).

This exhibition is organized by Raymund Ryan, curator, Heinz Architectural Center.

Support for this exhibition was provided by the Drue Heinz Trust, which also provides generous support for the operations and other programs of the Heinz Architectural Center.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Experience the Whimsy of Lina Bo Bardi’s Drawings at Carnegie Museum of Art

Experience the Whimsy of Lina Bo Bardi’s Drawings at Carnegie Museum of Art
Exhibition in the Heinz Architectural Center Highlights Bo Bardi’s Creative Practice

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Lina Bo Bardi Draws
November 22, 2019–March 29, 2020
Heinz Architectural Center

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is thrilled to present an exhibition exploring the drawing practice of famed 20th-century architect Lina Bo Bardi. Lina Bo Bardi Draws brings together a selection of nearly 100 drawings, ranging from Bo Bardi’s early life to the end of her career, from more than 6,000 drawings in her extensive archives in São Paulo.

Bo Bardi was a prolific and idiosyncratic designer. Born in Italy, she was educated in Rome and worked in the Milan studio of the Modernist architect Gio Ponti. Bo Bardi moved to Brazil in 1946, where her interest in local materials and practices enriched her Modernist approach to design. Her most notable projects include the Museu de Arte in São Paulo (MASP) and SESC Pompeia, a factory rehabilitated into a cultural center, also in São Paulo. Her creative work extended far beyond architecture, incorporating furniture and jewelry design, theatrical design, teaching, curating, and architectural criticism.

The exhibition invites visitors to explore the importance of drawing to this influential architect’s design process and built work. Completed in a variety of media—pencil, watercolor, gouache, felt pen, pen and ink—the drawings reveal Bo Bardi’s broad view of design and architecture as accessible to everyone, nurtured by her interest in nature and everyday life.

A colorful mixed media artwork showing the inside of a building, two people walking down a pathway, and colorful banners on the ceiling.

Lina Bo Bardi, Study for furniture design at Milan Triennale (detail), ca. 1946, Courtesy of INSTITUTO BARDI / CASA DE VIDRO

“Drawing, with its slow and intimate gestures, was her way of dwelling in the world,” writes curator Zeuler R. Lima, PhD, in his introduction to Lina Bo Bardi Drawings (Princeton University Press, 2019). “Drawing conveyed, at the tip of her hands, a representational purpose and also a somewhat magical realism spell.”

A version of this exhibition, also curated by Lima, appeared at the Fundacío Joan Miró in Barcelona as Lina Bo Bardi Drawing from February to May 2019.

Lina Bo Bardi Draws is curated by Zeuler R. Lima and brought to the museum by the Heinz Architectural Center.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

New Exhibition Celebrates Forty Years of Architecture Innovation

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces a new exhibition to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, opening May 4.

Founded in 1979 by the Pritzker family, the international prize is awarded annually to a living architect or architects for significant contribution to the art of architecture. This exhibition contains the work of more than half of the architects who have won this prize, including the 2019 recipient, Arata Isozaki.

Influencers: The Pritzker Architecture Prize presents works spanning decades of architectural innovation and creativity, offering visitors the compelling opportunity to trace changing architecture trends over the past half-century. The exhibition features models, drawings, and photographs from the museum’s substantial architecture collection, in addition to other works from the Decorative Arts and Design and Photography collections.

A cityscape showing tall buildings and a car.

Jean Nouvel, Competition Entry: Central Berlin, 1990, photomontage with computer print on photographic paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, 1997.47. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.

The exhibition coincides with the museum’s summer camp program, which makes use of the Heinz Architectural Center as a place for learning and inspiration. Campers can take architecture classes and work closely with the objects on view as they use the museum as a classroom. CMOA partners with Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture to bring architecture graduate students to lead these camps.

On March 30, hear Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu, co-founders of the Amateur Architecture Studio in Hangzhou, China, give the Gold Medal Keynote lecture for the Association of Collegiate School of Architecture at Carnegie Music Hall in Oakland. Wang Shu’s work will be represented in Influencers when it opens in May.

Influencers: The Pritzker Architecture Prize is organized by Raymund Ryan, curator, Heinz Architectural Center.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Exhibitions and Programming for January–June

Contact
Emily Willson
Carnegie Museum of Art
willsone@cmoa.org
412.622.3328

Pittsburgh, PA (January 9, 2019) Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces four new exhibitions, dynamic social programming, and engaging educational opportunities for 2019. The exhibitions represent a wide range of artistic styles and periods, from decorative arts and design and contemporary art to classic Impressionism favorites.

“I’m proud of the variety this year,” says Henry H.J. Heinz II Acting Co-Director Catherine Evans. “They show the dynamic and varied experiences you can have at a museum—from seeing Ruth Root’s fabulous patterns to studying the serial painting techniques of Monet to learning about the latest breakthroughs in accessibility design. Museums should be a place for discovery and inspiration, and I think 2019 embodies that spirit.”

New Exhibitions

Ruth Root

April 19–August 25
Forum Gallery

The 81st installment of CMOA’s Forum series will debut a new body of work by acclaimed New York–based painter Ruth Root. For the last two decades, Root has fashioned unruly paintings that push the boundaries of the medium and delight in the pleasures of pattern and shape. For this new series, curator Eric Crosby invited Root to mine CMOA’s collection of artworks and design objects as inspiration for her digitally printed fabrics, which suspend irregular sheets of painted plastic. Through a visual dialogue with the museum’s collection, her eye-popping works personify the wonder of painting.

Ruth Root, digital fabric design for Untitled, 2017; Image courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Ruth Root, digital fabric design for Untitled, 2017; Image courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Influencers: The Pritzker Architecture Prize

May 4–September 2
Heinz Architectural Center

Since its establishment in 1979, the Pritzker Architecture Prize has become the most esteemed prize in architecture worldwide; awarded to individual architects for their total body of work, the Pritzker is frequently referred to as the Nobel Prize for Architecture. To mark the prize’s 40th anniversary, Raymund Ryan, curator, Heinz Architectural Center, presents work from the museum’s collection done by Pritzker laureates. Bolstered by several recent acquisitions, these drawings, models, furniture, and photographs are presented in collaboration with the annual summer camp to stimulate the imaginations of museum visitors and camp participants alike.

Hans Hollein, Stadtstruktur (City Structure), 1959, ink on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. 2018.23.

Hans Hollein, Stadtstruktur (City Structure), 1959, ink on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. 2018.23.

Monet and the Modern City

May 25–September 2
Gallery One

Monet and his contemporaries responded to the urban industrial landscape through works that convey the power and promise of modernization. Organized by curator Akemi May, this exhibition contextualizes Monet’s famous Waterloo Bridge series with other artists’ work from the time, exploring Monet’s process of serial painting and the enduring theme of industry in art. Carnegie Museum of Art’s own Waterloo Bridge painting is presented alongside two others from the series, thanks to the Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester and the Worcester Art Museum, and captures the range of moods and colors that serial painting can produce. Other notable works include pieces by Camille Pissarro, Jean-Emile Laboureur, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler, which provide a broader frame of reference for the urban industrial landscape as subject.

Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, London, 1903, Carnegie Museum of Art. Acquired through the generosity of the Sarah Mellon Scaife Family. 67.2

Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, London, 1903, Carnegie Museum of Art.
Acquired through the generosity of the Sarah Mellon Scaife Family. 67.2

Access+Ability

June 1–October 6, 2019
Heinz Galleries

Access+Ability highlights some of the extraordinary research and designs developed during the past decade with and by people who span a wide range of physical, cognitive, and sensory abilities. Fueled by demand and advances in research and digital technologies, a proliferation of functional, life-enhancing products is creating unprecedented access. Low-tech designs that assist with daily routines, digital technology like eye-tracking devices for communicating and editing, and sensors that stabilize tremors associated with Parkinson’s disease, plus innovations in all-terrain wheelchairs, are augmenting the potential for people to access the world in ways previously unimaginable. These objects—some of which are still in prototype stage, and many of which are available commercially—represent the future of accessibility design.

Access+Ability was organized by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. The CMOA presentation of Access+Ability is organized by Rachel Delphia, the Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design.

Earring Aid, Bedazzled, 2014. Designed by Elana Langer. Swarovski crystals, e6000 glue, hearing aid. Gift of Elana Langer. Photo: © Hanna Agar.

Earring Aid, Bedazzled, 2014. Designed by Elana Langer. Swarovski crystals, e6000 glue, hearing aid. Gift of Elana Langer. Photo: © Hanna Agar.

Ongoing and Educational

Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018.

Open through March 25
Presented by Bank of America

The second-oldest exhibition of global art, the Carnegie International opened with excitement in October of last year. This sprawling show, which permeates the museum’s exhibition spaces and reaches into its collection galleries, sees its final three months arrive with a variety of activities: visiting artist lectures by Jeremy Deller, Ulrike Müller, and Thaddeus Mosley; a Tam O’Shanter Drawing Session with Beverly Semmes; a Sound Series concert produced by Josiah McElheny, John Corbett, and Jim Dempsey with the Andy Warhol Museum; and drawing sessions with Yuji Agematsu and Tavares Strachan. See the works of Carnegie Prize–winner Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and Fine Prize–winners Postcommodity before the exhibition closes in March.

Social Programs

Ongoing

People engage with art on many levels. The social programming at CMOA aims to bring new faces into the museum and create opportunities for discovery and inspiration. These programs range from the FEAST dinner series—which pairs a local chef with a theme from the Carnegie International for a unique dining experience—to monthly Third Thursday, a themed 18+ event that invites local artists and vendors to create programming relevant to the current exhibitions. An important piece of the museum’s mission of connecting people to art, ideas, and one another, social programs offer an avenue to build engagement and respond to the community.

Summer Camps

June 10–August 16

Following a winter and spring of educational programming, including the exhibition of work by students from The Art Connection, the museum will launch a full calendar of summer camps. Camps offer a unique opportunity to dive deeper into all aspects of art-making, creativity, and collaboration through week-long programs. As part of the museum’s ongoing mission of educating and inspiring, summer camps provide the structure and materials for young people to engage their own creative process. Using the museum’s collection as a resource, campers of all levels and abilities explore through classic and modern art techniques, styles, and practices.


Our Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another.
We believe creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences.

Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Architecture, Technology collide in Copy + Paste

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.216.7909

Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture
October 14, 2017–May 6, 2018
The Heinz Architectural Center Galleries + Hall of Architecture

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture, an eight-month investigation into the museum’s spectacular Hall of Architecture. Visitors to the Hall are constantly wowed by the nearly 150 building facades, monuments, and fragments from across the Western World. What many people don’t realize is that this collection is entirely plaster copies, painstakingly cast and reassembled in 1906–1907. It is the only remaining collection of its type in the US, and one of Pittsburgh’s most iconic spaces.

Over the course of Copy + Paste, curators, technologists, students, architects, and artists will test new ways of presenting information about this special collection. Activities in The Heinz Architectural Center and the Hall range from augmented reality and 3D printing to creative interventions and hands-on activities. The Hall is a mash-up of geography, styles, and periods, so contextualizing and presenting rich content is a priority for Copy + Paste organizer Alyssum Skjeie.

A screen held up to an architectural column displays text information about that object, showing both the column and text on the screen.

Courtesy of Francesca Torello and Josh Bard

Copy + Paste activities and visitor feedback will inform future efforts to create a dynamic, active, and inspiring Hall. These activities include:

  • Plaster Re-Cast – Experience the Hall of Architecture with a new augmented-reality app, by Francesca Torello and Josh Bard from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), School of Architecture. See this impressive cast collection in a new light through interactive historical content and virtual 3D models of the original buildings
  • CMU Architecture Studio – professor of architecture Joshua Bard leads a studio exploring the material culture of architectural plaster, examining its historic importance and possible future robotic applications. Students will work in the exhibition galleries, and their resulting experiments will join the Copy + Paste presentation.
  • CopyShop – a space for creative thinking and making inspired by the Hall of Architecture, the Copy Shop hosts visitor activities designed by invited makerspace expert Jennifer Grayburn in collaboration with the CMOA Education and Exhibition departments.
  • Archival Materials – new digitization efforts make available historic documents on the Hall of Architecture’s original 1907 design, the creation of the casts themselves, and the ideals of creating a grand study collection for people who could not travel. Some of the most intriguing items will be on view in the exhibition, with periodic rotations.

Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture is organized by Alyssum Skjeie, program manager, The Heinz Architectural Center.

HACLab is a project of CMOA’s Heinz Architectural Center. Each Lab invites creative thinkers to design dynamic experiences investigating architecture in Pittsburgh and beyond. The projects are fluid, experimental, and evolve using visitor participation and feedback. We hope that HACLabs offer visitors a new appreciation of human encounters with the built environment.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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