Media Archive: Contemporary Art

Carnegie Museum of Art Launches New Exhibition Series Dedicated to the Museum’s Film & Video Collection with Rachel Rose: Lake Valley on May 20

Carnegie Museum of Art Launches New Exhibition Series Dedicated to the Museum’s Film & Video Collection with Rachel Rose: Lake Valley on May 20

Pittsburgh, PA—For the first time in its history, Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) launches a new, online exhibition series dedicated to the museum’s film and video collection. This extension of the museum’s curatorial program into the digital sphere offers a new channel for local and global audiences to experience time-based works previously only accessible in person. With this initiative, CMOA is revolutionizing how visitors can engage with its significant holdings at a time when most cultural institutions are closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“We are all looking for opportunities to be inspired and find solace and comfort during this challenging time,” says Eric Crosby, the museum’s Henry J. Heinz II Director. “In order to serve our visitors in new ways that are meaningful to them, we must fundamentally rethink the traditional museum experience. Regardless of whether our doors are open or closed, there should be countless opportunities for our digital audiences to experience and interpret art.”

A lushly illustrated landscape with a sulking animal in the foreground

Rachel Rose, Still from Lake Valley, 2016, Carnegie Museum of Art. Courtesy the artist. © Rachel Rose

The new exhibition series debuts on May 20 with Lake Valley, an eight-minute video work by Rachel Rose (American, b. 1986) lauded for its inclusion in the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018, and the 2017 Venice Biennale. With this visually rich, animated video, Rose mines themes and imagery from 19th- and 20th-century children’s literature to create a dream-like story about loneliness, imagination, and longing for personal connection. Debuting online while the museum’s doors remain closed due to COVID-19, this timely digital presentation brings the comfort and inspiration of art directly into the homes of museum visitors.

“I’m happy and honored to have Lake Valley shown as the inaugural video work in this new series presented by Carnegie Museum of Art, and I’m looking forward to seeing other works I might not have otherwise been able to see,” said Rachel Rose.

Rachel Rose: Lake Valley is accompanied by family-friendly educational activities that explore the themes of the work and invite close looking. On July 15, families will be invited to join a free online drawing session inspired by Rose’s process. On August 5, Rose will be joined by Crosby for a free online discussion about her work, its themes, and the way her creative process has shifted while sheltering in place. The exhibition will conclude with a commissioned essay in the museum’s award-winning online journal, Storyboard, before closing on August 16, 2020.

Future iterations of the series will draw from the museum’s historically significant film and video collection, which is comprised of nearly 1,000 works. The Department of Film and Video was among the first of its kind when it opened in 1970 as a three-year venture led by Sally Dixon, eventually growing into a full-fledged department that garnered national and international attention. In its first twenty years, the department worked with more than 150 artists including Stan Brakhage, Robert Breer, Joan Jonas, Carolee Schneemann, Hollis Frampton, Roger Jacoby, Bruce Conner, Freude Bartlett, and Yvonne Rainer. The Department of Film and Video was incorporated into the museum’s department of modern and contemporary art in 2003.

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Eric Crosby Named Director of Carnegie Museum of Art

Eric Crosby Named Director of Carnegie Museum of Art

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh announced today that Eric Crosby has been appointed The Henry J. Heinz II Director of Carnegie Museum of Art. Previously the Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Crosby became the museum’s acting director in January 2019. He will assume his role as director starting March 1.

“Eric has a deep commitment to the mission of Carnegie Museums and a clear understanding of what it will take to build on the distinctive strengths of Carnegie Museum of Art,” said Steven Knapp, president and CEO of Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh. “He was widely recognized as a creative and insightful curator before becoming acting director, and over the past year he has proven his ability to lead the museum’s talented staff as they lay the groundwork for the museum’s future. I look forward to supporting his efforts and benefiting from his advice in the months and years to come.”

Since joining the museum in 2015, Crosby has organized a number of significant exhibitions, including 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art, a collaborative group exhibition that considered the state of American identity and politics through the lenses of two major museum collections in dialogue. Crosby has also managed the museum’s Forum series, which presents the work of emerging and established artists, most recently Ruth Root, Ian Cheng, Michael Williams, and Alison Knowles.

Prior to the opening of the 2018 Carnegie International, Crosby oversaw a complete transformation of the museum’s postwar and contemporary galleries. Crossroads: 1945 to Now mines the depth and diversity of the collection by illuminating the critical role of the artist in everyday life. His curatorial work has left an indelible mark on the museum’s collection through a series of celebrated acquisitions, such as Kerry James Marshall’s Untitled (Gallery) (2016), Joan Brown’s The Room, Part 1 (1975), and major works from the 2018 Carnegie International, including works by the British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, the interdisciplinary collective Postcommodity, and Pittsburgh sculptor Thaddeus Mosley. In his role as acting director since early 2019, Crosby has been instrumental in reimagining the museum’s artistic program, in particular as the museum prepares for the next iteration of the Carnegie International, which will launch in 2022.

“I am deeply honored to take on the permanent role of director at Carnegie Museum of Art,” said Crosby. “For nearly 125 years, the museum has presented significant artworks from across the globe and inspired visitors through its exhibitions and collections as well as through the Carnegie International, the oldest and most prestigious survey of contemporary art in the United States. In this new chapter, I will continue to champion curatorial projects and educational initiatives that provoke critical conversations about our world and respond to the key social issues of our time, driving forward our team’s desire to redefine the role of art museums in the 21st century.”

“Eric has such passion for the museum, the city of Pittsburgh, and the greater arts community,” said Ellen Kessler, a Carnegie Museums life trustee and chair of the Carnegie Museum of Art Advisory Board. “He has proven to be an inspiring and engaging leader, and our advisory board is excited to continue working with and supporting Eric and his team as they lead the museum forward.”

Prior to joining Carnegie Museum of Art in 2015, Crosby was associate curator of visual arts at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He received his BA from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and an MA from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces a Season of Socially Responsive Exhibitions

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces a Season of Socially Responsive Exhibitions

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—In 2020 Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) welcomes a dynamic range of exhibitions that explore the many ways artists respond to their social, cultural, and ecological contexts. This ambitious season presents visitors with opportunities to consider the ongoing and sometimes ambiguous role of the artist in some of the most crucial conversations of our time.

“Artists have always been vital contributors to debates in our public sphere,” says Eric Crosby, The Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art. “Whether channeling political attitudes of the moment or creating space for conversation, artists contribute essential nuance and complexity to the issues that shape our present moment. How cultural institutions will embrace them and foster their work is a challenge for our century.”

CMOA’s upcoming calendar begins with the opening of a new dedicated space in the permanent collection galleries for the Charles “Teenie” Harris Archive, as well as a rotating gallery for photographs and works on paper. Read on to discover what lies in store for the museum’s visitors.

A young boy sits in a boxing ring with boxing gloves on, smiling at the camera

Charles “Teenie” Harris, Little boy boxer seated in boxing ring, ca. 1945, Carnegie Museum of Art, Teenie Harris Archive

Teenie Harris Gallery
Scaife Galleries
January 25, 2020–ongoing

CMOA is thrilled to announce the creation of a dedicated gallery for the Teenie Harris Archive. This space will feature iconic examples of Harris’s photographs and host a number of educational programs and community events inspired by this world-renowned collection.

Harris—who was a photographer for The Pittsburgh Courier, one of the nation’s most influential black newspapers—created an unparalleled chronicle of African American history and culture during the mid-twentieth century. As both a member and documentarian of the black community, Harris remains an iconic figure in Pittsburgh to this day. With this installation, the museum celebrates Harris’s legacy and looks forward to creating opportunities for creative collaboration with local partners.

The Teenie Harris Gallery is organized by Dominique Luster, archivist, and Charlene Foggie-Barnett, archive specialist, Teenie Harris Archive.

Photography and Works on Paper Gallery
Scaife Galleries
January 25, 2020–ongoing

Adjacent to the Teenie Harris Gallery, Carnegie Museum of Art also debuts a dedicated space for the presentation of photography and works on paper from the permanent collection. Inaugurating this space will be a selection of recent acquisitions in photography, on view through June 14, 2020. Featuring 25 works acquired over the past four years, the installation will highlight new and significant additions to the collection by artists including Ansel Adams, James Casbere, Nona Faustine, Vivian Maier, and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

This installation is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography, and Hannah Turpin, curatorial assistant for modern and contemporary art and photography.

A row of houses set behind a low wall with a colorful mural.

Christine Holtzer and Lauren S. Zadikow, 50 Greenspace Dumpsites, Forest Way, Site #2 (detail). Courtesy of the artists

Counterpressures
Forum Gallery
February 21–July 26, 2020

The 83rd installation of CMOA’s Forum series presents a thematic group exhibition that addresses the present urgency of global warming. The title, taken from a quotation in Pittsburgh environmentalist Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962), identifies the show’s specific focus on the fraught relationship between human impact and environmental response.

This exhibition features new and existing work by ten Pittsburgh-based artists who are acknowledging the transitory state of our environment, the ecological, economic, and public health consequences on the horizon, and how these conditions intersect with their own lived experiences. Through their selections of materials, the use of data and documentation, their surrealist imaginings, or references to urban development and disconnection from nature, these works grapple with the ecological present and its uncertain future.

Counterpressures has been developed in partnership with the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh, the oldes continuously-exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. Artists include Allison Blair, Paper Buck, Seth Clark, Tara Fay Coleman, Christine Holtz, Stephanie Martin, Travis Mitzel, Njaimeh Njie, Su Su, and Ginger Brooks Takahashi.

Counterpressures is organized by Hannah Turpin, curatorial assistant for modern and contemporary art and photography.

Major funding for the Forum series is generously provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation.

Viêt Nam Untitled Ho-Chi-Minh City 1995

An-My Lê, Untitled, Ho Chi Minh City, from the series Viêt Nam, 1995, gelatin silver print. Courtesy the artist. © An-My Lê

An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain
Heinz Galleries
March 14–July 26, 2020

Carnegie Museum of Art presents the first comprehensive survey of the work of photographer An-My Lê (American, born Vietnam, 1960). Featuring photographs from each of the artist’s major bodies of work, An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain creates connections across Lê’s career and provides unprecedented insight into her subtle, evocative images, which draw on traditions of landscape photography to explore the complexity of war and conflict.

Born in the midst of the Vietnam War, Lê vividly remembers the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in a war zone. She and her family were evacuated by the US military in 1975. It would take another 20 years for Lê to return to her homeland, this time with a large-format camera in tow. Since then, she has spent nearly twenty-five years recording the impact of the military on people, the landscape, and cultural memory.

The exhibition features selections from each of Lê’s seven series, including works from her latest series, Silent General, on view for the first time.

An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography. Major support for this exhibition is provided by Lannan Foundation, Philip and Edith Leonian Foundation, and The Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund. Additional support is provided by The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art.

The Fabricated Landscape
Heinz Architectural Center
May 9–September 13, 2020

This exhibition presents work by ten architectural practices from around the world, each represented by three projects that range from single houses to projects that operate at the scale of the natural terrain and urban infrastructure. All of these projects exhibit a sensibility toward the larger world to which they belong and contribute.

Each of these practices looks anew at architecture’s need to communicate with and augment the public sphere. These architects approach urban intervention and landscape with an alertness to sociopolitical issues and a renewed appreciation of craft. Several of the projects are specific to postindustrial communities and the Global South. Many of the objects have not been exhibited previously in the United States.

The Fabricated Landscape features projects by Assemble (England), Frida Escobedo (Mexico), Go Hasegawa and Associates (Japan), Studio Anna Heringer (Germany), Studio Anne Holtrop (Bahrain), LCLA office (Colombia/Norway), MAIO (Spain), OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen (Belgium), SO–IL (USA), and UMWELT (Chile).

This exhibition is organized by Raymund Ryan, curator, Heinz Architectural Center.

Support for this exhibition was provided by the Drue Heinz Trust, which also provides generous support for the operations and other programs of the Heinz Architectural Center.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum Of Art Announces Major Survey Of The Prints Of Jasper Johns

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018
October 12, 2019–January 19, 2020
Heinz Galleries

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is pleased to announce it will be the premiering venue for a major touring exhibition dedicated to the printed work of iconic American artist Jasper Johns. Organized by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, which holds a complete archive of the artist’s prints, An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018 presents a rare opportunity for visitors to explore the influential artists’ work in depth.

When Jasper Johns’s paintings of flags and targets debuted in 1958, they brought him instant acclaim and established him as a critical link between Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. In the ensuing 60 years, Johns has continued to astonish viewers with the beauty and complexity of his paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints. Today, he is widely considered one of America’s most influential artists.

A colorful target on a bright background with a few paint drips coming from the bottom edge

Jasper Johns, Target, 1974, screen print on paper, 35 1/8 x 27 3/8 in., ed. 3/70, Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988. © Jasper Johns/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Four Carnegie Internationals in the 1950s and 1960s featured Johns’s work, and he received the exhibition’s top Carnegie Prize twice. These events aligned with a monumentally important era for his career, a period that would secure Johns’s status as an artist of international influence and acclaim.

“Jasper Johns has a significant history with this museum,” says Eric Crosby, Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art. “We are honored to present his prints in greater depth to our audience and launch the tour of such an important exhibition.”

An Art of Changes surveys six decades of Johns’s work in printmaking through a selection of some 90 works in intaglio, lithography, woodcut, linoleum cut, screen printing, and lead relief. This broad selection of works manifests the shifts in subject, material, and mood over the course of Johns’s virtuosic career.

Organized in four thematic, roughly chronological sections, the exhibition follows Johns as he revises and recycles key motifs over time. While his early works were intentionally uninflected, later images are more personal, melancholic, and even surreal.

Two U.S. flags side by side: the left one is brighter and cleaner and the right is dingier, the white of the stripes yellowed and greying

Jasper Johns, Flags I, 1973, screen print on paper, 27 3/8 x 35 ½ in., ed. 3/65, Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988. © Jasper Johns/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

The exhibition begins with a group of works based on common signs and symbols, such as flags, targets, and the alphabet—familiar subjects from the paintings that launched his career—which Johns refers to as “things the mind already knows.” Works in this section include the Color Numeral Series of 1969; the bravura screen print Flags I (1973); and Fragments of a Letter (2010), which presents a text in both English and American Sign Language.

In the second section, viewers will experience prints of artists’ tools and materials, such as stretched canvases, brushes, rulers, and color names. A highlight of this section is the series Fragments According to What (1971), seven prints based on motifs Johns extracted from his eponymous 1964 painting. Also in this section are Souvenir (1972), the first print in which Johns included an image of himself; the offset lithograph Decoy II (1971–73), made from castoff examples of an earlier print; and six variations of his well-known image of paintbrushes in a Savarin coffee can.

Jasper Johns, Savarin, 1977, lithograph on paper, 45 1/2 x 34 in., ed. 3/50, Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988. © Jasper Johns and U.L.A.E./VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY, Published by Universal Limited Art Editions

The third section features abstract works based on motifs such as flagstones and hatch marks. These became a rich source that he returned to often during the 1970s and beyond. Works in this section include Between the Clock and the Bed (1989) and Within (2007).

During the mid-1980s, Johns began using overtly personal motifs in his work, acknowledging that although he had tried in his early work to keep his emotions and personality hidden, it was finally time to “drop the reserve.” His paintings and prints began to teem with autobiographical and personal imagery. These motifs are featured in the final section of the show, which features a series of large-scale intaglios, The Seasons (1987). Also on view are several prints that incorporate elements of a portrait by Pablo Picasso, such as Face with Watch (1996) and Untitled (2016); and a series from 2014, Regrets, which are based on a photograph of the artist Lucien Freud and stamped “Regrets/Jasper Johns.”

The exhibition is accompanied by weekend tours and daily drop-in conversations with docents, free with admission.

Jasper Johns, The Seasons (Summer), 1987, intaglio on paper, 26 ¼ x 19 1/18 in., ed. 3/73, Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988, © Jasper Johns and U.L.A.E./VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY, Published by Universal Limited Art Editions

“Johns reinvented the medium of printmaking in the 1960s and 1970s and since he has continually used it to reinvent himself as an artist,” says Crosby. “This exhibition will be nothing short of a master class in visual creativity.”

An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018 is organized by the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. Major support is provided by Judy Dayton and the Prospect Creek Foundation.

The exhibition is curated by Joan Rothfuss, guest curator, Visual Arts, Walker Art Center. Carnegie Museum of Art’s presentation is organized by Eric Crosby, Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art.


Support

Major support for this exhibition is provided by The Virginia Kaufman Fund, the James H. and Idamae B Rich Art Exhibition Endowment, the Bernard S. & Barbara F. Mars Fund, and the Martin G McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum Of Art Announces New Exhibitions That Explore Creativity In Its Many Forms

Highlights Include a Survey of Prints by Influential American Artist Jasper Johns and a New Collection Gallery Dedicated to Art and Design from Pittsburgh

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—Over the next six months, Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) will present a program of thought-provoking exhibitions that investigate the many facets of human creativity. From 17th-century still life paintings to vibrant, contemporary prints and a new commissioned sculpture, the offerings present visitors with a diverse range of artistic experiences and myriad opportunities for conversation.

“Where does creativity come from?” asks Eric Crosby, Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art. “How do our minds and hands give form to something new, unfamiliar, perhaps even strange? What, fundamentally, is the work of the artist? By posing these questions across our many exhibitions, we hope visitors will look closely, encounter new ideas, and unearth answers that are meaningful to them.”

CMOA’s upcoming calendar is anchored by two special exhibitions, each presenting a detailed investigation of a single mode of creative expression. In the Heinz Galleries, An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018, organized by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, surveys the influential American artist’s career long fascination with printmaking. In Gallery One, A Delight for the Senses: The Still Life celebrates an often-overlooked genre of painting that for centuries has harnessed the power of close observation to spark creativity.

Elsewhere in the museum, visitors will have a surprising encounter with a meticulously rendered, lifelike sculpture by Los Angeles–based artist Margaret Honda in the Forum Gallery. A selection of iconic photographs by Charles “Teenie” Harris—staff favorites from past exhibitions—will greet visitors in the Lobby Gallery. Finally, in the Scaife Collection Galleries, A Pittsburgh Anthology will explore Pittsburgh’s special place in history as a city of creativity and artistic innovation by featuring a rotating selection of objects from CMOA’s collections.

A large, green pickle on a white plate

Duane Michals, A Gursky Gherkin is Just a Very Large Pickle, 2001, Carnegie Museum of Art, The Henry L. Hillman Fund. © Duane Michals

A Pittsburgh Anthology
Scaife Gallery 17
August 15, 2019–ongoing

A Pittsburgh Anthology celebrates stories of creative life in Pittsburgh as prompted by Carnegie Museum of Art’s collections across time and media. Since its inception in 1895, the museum has collected works by, about, and for Pittsburgh. Each object sheds light on the many ways that artists, whether local or passing through, engage with the city, its people, communities, landscape, and built environment. While some objects reveal the creative impulse to map or document the city, others speak to Pittsburgh’s unique cultural character.

With this project, CMOA will dedicate Scaife Gallery 17 to exploring these stories, relayed by a multitude of voices from inside and outside the museum. Each story will unfold on printed cards displayed near the artworks, which will be free for the taking. For those wishing to create their own anthology, customizable binders will be available for purchase in the museum store.

A Pittsburgh Anthology is organized by Eric Crosby, Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art; Rachel Delphia, The Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts & Design; and Hannah Turpin, Curatorial Assistant, Contemporary Art and Photography, Carnegie Museum of Art.

A young woman sits on top of a large old-school car in front of a smoky city landscape

Charles “Teenie” Harris, Doris Clark (Moody) seated on Buick car with steel mill in background, Clairton, ca. 1945, Teenie Harris Archive, Carnegie Museum of Art

Iconic: The Photographs of Charles “Teenie” Harris
Lobby Gallery
Ongoing starting this summer

The next exhibition of photographs by Charles “Teenie” Harris will look back at some of the Hill District native’s most iconic images of Pittsburgh. For more than four decades, Harris photographed the city’s African American community for the Pittsburgh Courier, one of the nation’s most influential black newspapers. Since 2011, Carnegie Museum of Art has been showcasing his indelible work through a series of focused exhibitions spanning a number of themes, topics, and histories—Hair (2013), Civil Rights (2015) and Jazz from the Hill (2018)—to name a few. The museum’s collection of nearly 80,000 Harris images is one of the most detailed and intimate records of the black urban experience known today.

This installment celebrates Harris’s work with a selection of staff favorites from past exhibitions. From portraits of Pirates pitching ace Al McBean at Forbes Field and a haunting double exposure of Nina Simone to a pair of Tuskegee Airmen standing at attention and three young boys witnessing the demolition of the Lower Hill, Harris documented cultural moments that were at once hyper-local and nationally resonant. CMOA is currently preparing a gallery in the Scaife Collection Galleries dedicated to the Archive, which will open in early 2020.

The exhibition is organized by Charlene Foggie-Barnett and Dominique Luster, Teenie Harris Archive, Carnegie Museum of Art.

Margaret Honda
Forum Gallery
September 20, 2019–January 26, 2020

The 82nd installment of CMOA’s Forum series debuts a new commission by Los Angeles–based artist Margaret Honda (b. 1961, San Diego, California). For this exhibition, Honda has created a singular, enigmatic sculpture. Painstakingly rendered in lifelike detail including internal organs, and measuring nearly five feet long, the work is modeled after a frog-like form Honda observed in a Renaissance painting at the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana in Milan. The painting, Bramantino’s Madonna delle Torri (1520), depicts the Madonna and Child enthroned; at their feet lies a slain man and a gargantuan frog with anthropomorphic features. At once material and philosophical, Honda’s sculpture prompts us to ponder our relationship to art and the world we make.

Margaret Honda is organized by Eric Crosby, Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art, Carnegie Museum of Art.

Major funding for the Forum series is generously provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation. Additional support for this exhibition is provided by the Ruth Levine Memorial Fund.

An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018
Heinz Galleries
October 12, 2019–January 19, 2020

When Jasper Johns’s paintings of flags and targets debuted in 1958, they brought him instant acclaim and established him as a critical link between Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. In the ensuing 60 years, Johns has continued to astonish viewers with the beauty and complexity of his paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints. Today, he is widely considered one of America’s most influential artists.

An Art of Changes is a rare opportunity to survey six decades of Johns’s work in printmaking through a selection of some 90 works in intaglio, lithography, woodcut, linoleum cut, screenprinting, and lead relief. Organized in four thematic, roughly chronological sections, the exhibition follows Johns as he revises and recycles key motifs over time. Viewers will see examples of his familiar flags and targets as well as images that explore artists’ tools, materials, and techniques of mark-making; abstract works based on motifs known as flagstones and hatch marks; and later works that teem with autobiographical and personal imagery.

An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018 is organized by the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. Major support is provided by Judy Dayton and the Prospect Creek Foundation.

The exhibition is curated by Joan Rothfuss, guest curator, Visual Arts, Walker Art Center. Carnegie Museum of Art’s presentation is organized by Eric Crosby, Henry J. Heinz II Acting Director and Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art.

A bowl of ripe lemons, some peeled, with greenery in the background.

Jacob Fopsen van Es, Still Life with Lemons, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of the Drue Heinz Charitable Trust

A Delight for the Senses: The Still Life
Gallery One
November 2, 2019–March 15, 2020

Once considered the lowliest of the painting genres, the still life has long been overshadowed in the history of art. A Delight for the Senses: The Still Life is a celebration of this humble genre, exploring nearly 250 years of the tradition from the Dutch Golden Age to America’s Gilded Age.

On the surface, these picturesque arrangements are easy to appreciate for their aesthetic beauty and skillful rendering. A closer look at these sumptuous arrays of objects ranging from the mundane to the luxurious reveals moral undertones and allusions to the transience of life. Loans from the Detroit Institute of Arts and several local collectors will be featured, along with recent bequests from the late Drue Heinz, including the only Dutch Golden Age still life in the museum’s collection on view for the first time.

A Delight for the Senses: The Still Life is curated by Akemi May, Assistant Curator, Fine Arts, Carnegie Museum of Art.

Major support for this exhibition is provided by Elizabeth Hurtt Branson and Douglas Branson.


Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.