Media Archive: Carnegie International

Carnegie Museum of Art Presents Rokni Haerizadeh’s Reign of Winter as Next Installment of its Online Exhibition Series

Carnegie Museum of Art Presents Rokni Haerizadeh’s Reign of Winter as Next Installment of its Online Exhibition Series

The film debuted in the United States at the 56th Carnegie International and is part of the museum’s permanent collection

A headless bride and groom walk hand in hand as a snow falls.

Rokni Haerizadeh, Reign of Winter (detail of film still), 2012-2013, Carnegie Museum of Art, The Henry L. Hillman Fund, © Rokni Haerizadeh. By permission.

Pittsburgh, PA. February 17, 2021 – Today, Carnegie Museum of Art presents Reign of Winter (2012- 2013), an animated video work by Iranian artist Rokni Haerizadeh, as the next installment of its online exhibition series. Haerizadeh’s film is accessible to audiences worldwide now through May 16, 2021 on cmoa.org.

The seven-minute silent video Reign of Winter uses rotoscope animation to transform thousands of still images taken from the televised 2011 British royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton into a fantastical moving dreamscape. Haerizadeh hand-painted footage of the nuptials frame-by-frame, altering one of the most highly televised events in recent history through surreal backdrops, textural detailing, and anthropomorphizing the wedding party into wild creatures.

“In this moment marked by the pandemic, intersecting social justice movements, and distrust of mainstream media, Reign of Winter reframes our understanding of power and celebrity, and how the press creates and perpetuates narratives related to both,” says Kiki Teshome, Carnegie Museum of Art’s Margaret Powell Curatorial Fellow and exhibition curator. “Through the tedious rotoscope process, Haerizadeh creates a surrealist world that is simultaneously whimsical and critical of our societal structures at large.”

Through rotoscope animation, Haerizadeh’s works create an entirely new medium, which he calls moving paintings. “Traditional paintings are often seen as static objects, separate from the process and time spent creating them,” Haerizadeh notes. “To me, it is important to make the underlying element of time visible, almost as if the painting is unfolding before the viewer.”

Reign of Winter debuted in the United States at the 56th Carnegie International in 2013. This presentation also doubled as Haerizadeh’s first exhibition in the United States. Along with a collection of works on paper by the artist, Carnegie Museum of Art acquired Reign of Winter for its film and video collection following the conclusion of the International.

The presentation of Reign of Winter will be accompanied by a variety of online events and programs including Reign of Winter watch parties on March 25 from 7–8 p.m., April 22 from 12:00-1:00 p.m., and May 18 from 7–8 p.m. followed by group conversation and artmaking led by Teshome. Unless otherwise noted, Carnegie Museum of Art events are pay what you wish with registration and all times are Eastern. More details can be found on cmoa.org.

Rokni Haerizadeh: Reign of Winter is organized by Kiki Teshome, Carnegie Museum of Art’s Margaret Powell Curatorial Fellow. The exhibition is on view and accessible to all, free of charge, on cmoa.org.

Online Exhibition Series
Carnegie Museum of Art’s online exhibition series draws from the museum’s vast film and video collection and is an extension of the museum’s curatorial program in the digital sphere. The online exhibition series offers a new channel for local and global audiences alike to experience time-based works previously only accessible in-person. With this initiative, Carnegie Museum of Art is revolutionizing how visitors can engage with its significant holdings at a time when many cultural institutions are closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Premier Partners
Generous support from Carnegie Museum of Art Premier Partners: Highmark, NOVA Chemicals, and Waldron Wealth.

Health and Safety
The health and safety of museum visitors and staff is Carnegie Museum of Art’s highest priority. The museum is following CDC recommended safety protocols with updated health and safety procedures. These include limiting admissions to 15% of building capacity through required timed ticketing; requiring face coverings; encouraging safe social distancing of six feet or more between groups and individuals; enhanced air-filtration and cleaning protocols; and clearly marking foot-traffic patterns in high-traffic areas. Carnegie Museum of Art is also designating special hours for those visitors who are high-risk due to age (65+) or a medical condition on Wednesday mornings from 10 a.m.–12 noon.

Mission
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

For press inquiries, please contact: Elle Moody at Elle@suttoncomms.com.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Doug Aitken’s migration (empire) as Next Installment in Its Online Exhibition Series

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Doug Aitken’s migration (empire) as Next Installment in Its Online Exhibition Series
On view on cmoa.org from August 19–November 15, 2020

On August 19, Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) will launch the second installment of its online exhibition series dedicated to the museum’s film and video collection, which began in May 2020 with Rachel Rose: Lake Valley. This extension of the museum’s curatorial program into the digital sphere offers a new channel for local and global audiences alike to experience time-based works previously only accessible in person.

This next iteration of the exhibition series will feature migration (empire) (2008), a twenty-four-minute video work by multidisciplinary artist Doug Aitken (American, b. 1968). The film was exhibited on the Museum of Art’s façade during Life on Mars: 55th Carnegie International in 2008.

“We were thrilled with audiences’ reactions to and enjoyment of Rachel Rose: Lake Valley, which inaugurated a new platform for our artistic program,” says Eric Crosby, the museum’s Henry J. Heinz II Director. “Our online exhibitions allow us to expand access to our moving image collection and engage audiences in new and meaningful ways, no matter where they reside.”

In a series of vignettes, Aitken’s migration (empire) documents wild North American migratory animals relocated from their natural habitats to vacant motel rooms. Whether it is a beaver swimming in a bathtub or a deer scavenging for food in a mini fridge, the animals engage with the constructed environments according to their feral instincts. These interactions, accompanied by footage of the built-up landscape, further exacerbate the palpable tension between the natural environment and the mythologized idea of America.

“The work was filmed in roadside motel rooms across the United States, including those in and around Pittsburgh, symbolizing human mobility, progress, and westward expansion,” explains exhibition curator Ashley McNelis. “The transitory spaces are interchangeable and do not provide a clear sense of place. The viewer, transported into alien but recognizable surroundings, is subtly asked to reflect upon our own species’ infringement of the natural environment.”

“With migration I wanted to create a window into the modern landscape. I traveled across the country
filming inside different hotel rooms documenting the landscape that we have created. A landscape of
repetition. This landscape is a vast system of arteries, and veins, but what was there before? I wanted to
look at a deeper history, an ecological history, integrating animal species that existed long before the
modern world,” says Douk Aiken

Doug Aitken: migration (empire) is accompanied by free online family-friendly educational activities that explore the themes of the work. On October 6, 7–8 p.m., families are invited to join a CMOA teaching artist for a live online conversation introduced by Ashley McNelis. The exhibition will also be accompanied by a photo essay by Leah Frances for the museum’s award-winning online journal Storyboard.

Doug Aitken: migration (empire) is organized by curatorial assistant Ashley McNelis.

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Sohrab Mohebbi as Curator of 58th Carnegie International, Opening 2022

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Sohrab Mohebbi as Curator of 58th Carnegie International, Opening 2022

Contact
Elle Moody
Carnegie Museum of Art
CMOA@suttoncomms.com
512.944.9340

Pittsburgh, PA—Eric Crosby, the Henry J. Heinz II Director of Carnegie Museum of Art announced today the appointment of Sohrab Mohebbi as the Kathe and Jim Patrinos Curator of the 58th Carnegie International, the longest-running survey of contemporary art in North America. The International, which will open in 2022, has been the museum’s signature exhibition since its establishment in 1896.

“I am thrilled to welcome Sohrab to Carnegie Museum of Art and to support his vision for the 58th Carnegie International,” said Crosby. “I have deep admiration for his curatorial work, which consistently foregrounds artists who are uniquely equipped to guide us in navigating the complexities of contemporary life. As a curator, he is committed to examining immediate, local concerns in a broader picture of the world today. I have no doubt he will lead our museum in creating an International that is more collaborative, interdisciplinary, and socially engaged than ever before.”

Mohebbi is a curator, art critic, and writer and comes to Pittsburgh from New York where he most recently served as curator at SculptureCenter. He previously worked at REDCAT and Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Queens Museum in New York. Mohebbi’s research focuses on how art can unframe prescribed ways of inhabiting and perceiving the world.

“It is exciting to shape the next International and be a part of a tremendous exhibition history and discourse that in each edition had to confront, redefine, and question how art breaks away from arbitrary definitions, boundaries, and borders,” Mohebbi says.

With curatorial planning for the International commencing, the themes of decentralization and reconstitution are guiding Mohebbi’s early research. Mohebbi envisions an International that will present Carnegie Museum of Art as one location among others in and around Pittsburgh and beyond, prompting the museum to forge new partnerships with arts organizations, music venues, local universities, and other civic entities. By tracing social, artistic, intellectual, and industrial histories of the city, Mohebbi hopes to connect local concerns rooted in Pittsburgh’s past to current issues prompting national and international debate today. Central to his research will be a collaborative curatorial effort to explore how we reconstitute our lives after upheavals caused by colonialism, imperialism, and environmental disaster.

Mohebbi has organized solo exhibitions by Banu Cennetoğlu, Fiona Connor, Tishan Hsu, Hassan Khan, John Knight, and Falke Pisano, among others. His group exhibitions include Searching the Sky for Rain (2019), It is obvious from the map (2017; co-curated by Thomas Keenan) and Hotel Theory (2015; with Ruth Estévez), which received The Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award in 2013. In 2012, he was the recipient of a grant from the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for his blog presencedocuments. Mohebbi received an M.A. from the Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies and a B.F.A. in Photography from Tehran Art University.

“SculptureCenter congratulates Sohrab on this significant appointment at Carnegie Museum of Art,” says Christian Rattemeyer, Director of SculptureCenter. “We are proud of what Sohrab has contributed to our museum during his time as Curator. We look forward to his work for the Carnegie International, and his continued relationship with us as Curator-at-Large.”

History of the International
Established in 1896 as the Annual Exhibition, the Carnegie International was initially held every fall (with few exceptions) and focused almost solely on painting. By 1955, the show had adopted a triennial schedule and, in 1958, it became known as the Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Paintings and Sculpture, a title it retained until 1970. After an interruption in the 1970s, the exhibition resumed in 1977 and 1979 as the International Series, single-artist shows intended as a parallel to the Nobel Prize for the arts. In 1982, it reappeared under its original triennial survey format as the Carnegie International, and has been mounted every three to five years since. After the Venice Biennale the Carnegie International is the longest-running international survey exhibition in the world.

Since 1896, the museum has acquired hundreds of works of art that have appeared in Carnegie International exhibitions, including works by Josef Albers, Dara Birnbaum, Louise Bourgeois, Mary Cassatt, Nicole Eisenman, Isa Genzken, Robert Gober, Dan Graham, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Mike Kelley, Ellsworth Kelly, Louise Lawler, Glenn Ligon, Agnes Martin, Julie Mehretu, Bruce Nauman, Chris Ofili, On Kawara, Nam June Paik, Sigmar Polke, Auguste Rodin, Doris Salcedo, John Singer Sargent, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Kara Walker, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

Prizes awarded to Carnegie International artists include the Carnegie Prize for outstanding achievement in the exhibition in the context of a lifetime of work, and the Fine Prize for an emerging artist in the exhibition.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

ERIC CROSBY NAMED DIRECTOR OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART

Headshot of Eric Crosby

Eric Crosby by Carnegie Museum of Art / Tom Little

ERIC CROSBY NAMED DIRECTOR OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART

CONTACT:
Elle Moody
Sutton Elle@suttoncomms.com 212.202.3402

PITTSBURGH, PA—Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh announced today that Eric Crosby has been appointed The Henry J. Heinz II Director of Carnegie Museum of Art. Previously the Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Crosby became the museum’s acting director in January 2019. He will assume his role as director starting March 1.

“Eric has a deep commitment to the mission of Carnegie Museums and a clear understanding of what it will take to build on the distinctive strengths of Carnegie Museum of Art,” said Steven Knapp, president and CEO of Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh. “He was widely recognized as a creative and insightful curator before becoming acting director, and over the past year he has proven his ability to lead the museum’s talented staff as they lay the groundwork for the museum’s future. I look forward to supporting his efforts and benefiting from his advice in the months and years to come.”

Since joining the museum in 2015, Crosby has organized a number of significant exhibitions, including 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art, a collaborative group exhibition that considered the state of American identity and politics through the lenses of two major museum collections in dialogue. Crosby has also managed the museum’s Forum series, which presents the work of emerging and established artists, most recently Ruth Root, Ian Cheng, Michael Williams, and Alison Knowles.

Prior to the opening of the 2018 Carnegie International, Crosby oversaw a complete transformation of the museum’s postwar and contemporary galleries. Crossroads: 1945 to Now mines the depth and diversity of the collection by illuminating the critical role of the artist in everyday life. His curatorial work has left an indelible mark on the museum’s collection through a series of celebrated acquisitions, such as Kerry James Marshall’s Untitled (Gallery) (2016), Joan Brown’s The Room, Part 1 (1975), and major works from the 2018 Carnegie International, including works by the British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, the interdisciplinary collective Postcommodity, and Pittsburgh sculptor Thaddeus Mosley. In his role as acting director since early 2019, Crosby has been instrumental in reimagining the museum’s artistic program, in particular as the museum prepares for the next iteration of the Carnegie International, which will launch in 2022.

“I am deeply honored to take on the permanent role of director at Carnegie Museum of Art,” said Crosby.“For nearly 125 years, the museum has presented significant artworks from across the globe and inspired visitors through its exhibitions and collections as well as through the Carnegie International, the oldest and most prestigious survey of contemporary art in the United States. In this new chapter, I will continue to champion curatorial projects and educational initiatives that provoke critical conversations about our world and respond to the key social issues of our time, driving forward our team’s desire to redefine the role of art museums in the 21st century.”

“Eric has such passion for the museum, the city of Pittsburgh, and the greater arts community,” said Ellen Kessler, a Carnegie Museums life trustee and chair of the Carnegie Museum of Art Advisory Board. “He has proven to be an inspiring and engaging leader, and our board is excited to continue working with and supporting Eric and his team as they lead the museum forward.”

Prior to joining Carnegie Museum of Art in 2015, Crosby was associate curator of visual arts at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He received his BA from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and an MA from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

About Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement, and is a champion of creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Its core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Its collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present.

About Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh
Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1895, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh is a family of four dynamic, distinctive museums: Carnegie Museum of Art, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Science Center, and The Andy Warhol Museum. The museums reach more than 1.5 million people annually through exhibitions, educational programs, outreach activities, and special events.

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Eric Crosby Named Director of Carnegie Museum of Art

Eric Crosby Named Director of Carnegie Museum of Art

Contact
Taia Pandolfi
Carnegie Museum of Art
pandolfit@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Pittsburgh, PA—Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh announced today that Eric Crosby has been appointed The Henry J. Heinz II Director of Carnegie Museum of Art. Previously the Richard Armstrong Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Crosby became the museum’s acting director in January 2019. He will assume his role as director starting March 1.

“Eric has a deep commitment to the mission of Carnegie Museums and a clear understanding of what it will take to build on the distinctive strengths of Carnegie Museum of Art,” said Steven Knapp, president and CEO of Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh. “He was widely recognized as a creative and insightful curator before becoming acting director, and over the past year he has proven his ability to lead the museum’s talented staff as they lay the groundwork for the museum’s future. I look forward to supporting his efforts and benefiting from his advice in the months and years to come.”

Since joining the museum in 2015, Crosby has organized a number of significant exhibitions, including 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art, a collaborative group exhibition that considered the state of American identity and politics through the lenses of two major museum collections in dialogue. Crosby has also managed the museum’s Forum series, which presents the work of emerging and established artists, most recently Ruth Root, Ian Cheng, Michael Williams, and Alison Knowles.

Prior to the opening of the 2018 Carnegie International, Crosby oversaw a complete transformation of the museum’s postwar and contemporary galleries. Crossroads: 1945 to Now mines the depth and diversity of the collection by illuminating the critical role of the artist in everyday life. His curatorial work has left an indelible mark on the museum’s collection through a series of celebrated acquisitions, such as Kerry James Marshall’s Untitled (Gallery) (2016), Joan Brown’s The Room, Part 1 (1975), and major works from the 2018 Carnegie International, including works by the British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, the interdisciplinary collective Postcommodity, and Pittsburgh sculptor Thaddeus Mosley. In his role as acting director since early 2019, Crosby has been instrumental in reimagining the museum’s artistic program, in particular as the museum prepares for the next iteration of the Carnegie International, which will launch in 2022.

“I am deeply honored to take on the permanent role of director at Carnegie Museum of Art,” said Crosby. “For nearly 125 years, the museum has presented significant artworks from across the globe and inspired visitors through its exhibitions and collections as well as through the Carnegie International, the oldest and most prestigious survey of contemporary art in the United States. In this new chapter, I will continue to champion curatorial projects and educational initiatives that provoke critical conversations about our world and respond to the key social issues of our time, driving forward our team’s desire to redefine the role of art museums in the 21st century.”

“Eric has such passion for the museum, the city of Pittsburgh, and the greater arts community,” said Ellen Kessler, a Carnegie Museums life trustee and chair of the Carnegie Museum of Art Advisory Board. “He has proven to be an inspiring and engaging leader, and our advisory board is excited to continue working with and supporting Eric and his team as they lead the museum forward.”

Prior to joining Carnegie Museum of Art in 2015, Crosby was associate curator of visual arts at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He received his BA from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and an MA from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.