Illustration from Allegheny Center: From a Rich Heritage, a New Way of Life… (brochure); Helmut Jacoby, renderer; Allegheny Center; Deeter & Ritchey, architect; Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh, ca. 1962

Exhibitions at CMOA: Summer and Fall 2015

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA… Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces upcoming exhibitions for the summer and fall of 2015. Highlights include a full retrospective of industrial designer Peter Muller-Munk, new painting by Jacqueline Humphries, contemporary photography by women from Iran and the Arab world, and a new experimental exhibition exploring Pittsburgh’s postwar urban development.

For more information, and access to images, please visit http://press.cmoa.org, or contact gauglerj@cmoa.org.

For events and programming, please visit http://cmoa.org

 

Exhibitions

 

She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World
Through September 28, 2015
Heinz Galleries

Rania Matar; Alia, Beirut, Lebanon, 2010; Inkjet print; From the series A Girl and Her Room; Courtesy of the artist and Carroll and Sons Gallery, Boston

Rania Matar; Alia, Beirut, Lebanon, 2010; Inkjet print; From the series A Girl and Her Room; Courtesy of the artist and Carroll and Sons Gallery, Boston

She Who Tells a Story introduces the pioneering work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the very notion of representation with passion and power, questioning tradition and challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. Their provocative work ranges from fine art to photojournalism and provides insights into political and social issues, including questions of personal identity and the complex political and social landscapes of their home regions in images of great sophistication, expressiveness, and beauty. She Who Tells a Story is an invitation not only to discover new photography, but to shift perspectives and to open a cultural dialogue that begins with art.

Includes works by Jananne Al-Ani, Boushra Almutawakel, Gohar Dashti, Rana El Nemr, Lalla Essaydi, Shadi Ghadirian, Tanya Habjouqa, Rula Halawani, Nermine Hammam, Rania Matar, Shirin Neshat, and Newsha Tavakolian.

She Who Tells a Story is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

 

Jacqueline Humphries
Forum 75
June 11–October 5, 2015
Forum Gallery

Over the course of her nearly 30-year career, Jacqueline Humphries (b. 1960, New Orleans) has emerged as a singular force in contemporary art, an influential “artist’s artist” whose signature abstract works in metallic and ultraviolet pigments must be experienced firsthand. Jacqueline Humphries is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in nearly a decade, and the most extensive presentation to date of both her silver and black-light paintings. The exhibition comprises entirely new works, created with CMOA’s unique spaces in mind.

Jacqueline Humphries; Untitled, 2015; oil on linen; courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali, New York

Jacqueline Humphries; Untitled, 2015; oil on linen; courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali, New York

Humphries’s densely layered, atmospheric canvases activate and are activated by the space around them. The muted metallic surfaces of the silver paintings respond to shifting natural light and the movements of the viewer, positioning abstract painting as a theatrical, time-based art. The black-light paintings reveal their true nature—and actually emit light—only when “excited” by ultraviolet bulbs. In their presence within a darkened room, viewers are immersed in spectacular fluorescence, their awareness of viewing and being viewed amplified. Both bodies of works self-consciously engage the history of art and refer to popular culture as well, melding the drips, zips, and Ben-day dots of mid-century abstraction with psychedelia and cinema’s silver screen.

The opening event on Wednesday, June 10, will be free and open to the public.

 

CMOA Collects Edward Hopper
July 25–October 26, 2015
Gallery One

Edward Hopper; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926; watercolor over charcoal on paper; Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal; Carnegie Museum of Art

Edward Hopper; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926; watercolor over charcoal on paper; Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal; Carnegie Museum of Art

In 1913, Edward Hopper sold his first painting at the first Armory Show. But it would be over a decade before the now-famed painter sold another. Instead, Hopper turned to etchings, drawings, and watercolors, finding recognition for his masterful compositions of quiet, meditative moments. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper presents all 17 works by Hopper in the museum’s collection, ranging from impressive examples of his etchings, drawings, and watercolors, to the oil paintings for which he is best known. This includes the first painting Hopper sold, Sailing (1911), and his 1936 painting Cape Cod Afternoon, produced after he gained widespread recognition. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper also presents prints by artists who influenced Hopper during his difficult formative years, including Rembrandt, John Sloan, and Charles Meryon.

Never before exhibited together, the works in CMOA Collects Edward Hopper reveal the development of an iconic American master, and shed light on the influences that produced his instantly recognizable style.

 

HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern
September 12, 2015–May 2, 2016
The Heinz Architectural Center

The city of Pittsburgh encountered modern architecture through an ambitious program of urban revitalization in the 1950s and ’60s. HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern untangles Pittsburgh’s complicated relationship with modern architecture and urban planning.

Harold Corsini; Gateway Center Under Construction, c. 1947-1952; Courtesy of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Harold Corsini; Gateway Center Under Construction, c. 1947-1952; Courtesy of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

In this experimental presentation at Carnegie Museum of Art’s Heinz Architectural Center, architects-in-residence over,under highlight successive histories of pioneering architectural successes, disrupted neighborhoods, and the utopian aspirations and ideals of public officials and business leaders. These intertwined narratives shape the exhibition’s presentation, which includes abundant archival materials from the period, an active architecture studio, and a salon-style discussion space, all unearthing layers of history and a range of perspectives.

Through these stories, HACLab Pittsburgh demonstrates the city’s national influence in the development of the modern American city, and focuses on several neighborhoods and sites, including Gateway Center, the Lower Hill, Allegheny Center, and Oakland.

 

The Propeller Group: The Living Need Light, The Dead Need Music
Forum 76
October 23, 2015–February 1, 2016
Forum Gallery

Video Still: The Propeller Group; The Living Need Light, the Dead Need Music, 2014; digital video, color, sound, 21 min.; A.W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund; Carnegie Museum of Art

Video Still: The Propeller Group; The Living Need Light, the Dead Need Music, 2014; digital video, color, sound, 21 min.; A.W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund; Carnegie Museum of Art

The Living Need Light, The Dead Need Music is a visual and musical journey through the fantastical funerary traditions of South Vietnam. Created by artist collective The Propeller Group, the video follows brass band musicians, spiritual mediums, professional criers, and street performers through the mournful and euphoric public ceremonies of a multi-day wake: a set of colorful rituals that resonate with funeral traditions in New Orleans and other parts of the “global south.”

Part documentary and part visionary reenactment, the video is a poetic rumination on life, death, and the stages in between. Ultimately, the work speaks across languages and cultures, amplifying a sense of cultural interconnection, and appealing to universal foundations of myth, storytelling, and mourning. Shot in ultra-high definition video, and produced with the technical sophistication of a Hollywood film, it immerses viewers in a lush and captivating dreamlike atmosphere.

 

Silver to Steel: The Modern Designs of Peter Muller-Munk
November 21, 2015–March 14, 2016
Heinz Galleries

Peter Muller-Munk Associates; Westinghouse portable radio, 1951; Carnegie Museum of Art; Photo: Tom Little for Carnegie Museum of Art

Peter Muller-Munk Associates; Westinghouse portable radio, 1951; Carnegie Museum of Art; Photo: Tom Little for Carnegie Museum of Art

Silver to Steel situates Peter Muller-Munk (1904–1967), a German émigré to the US, among the most influential designers of his generation. With more than 120 works of hand-wrought silver and popular mid-century products, supported by drawings, multimedia interviews, and period advertising, this exhibition presents the untold story of a man who rose from anonymity as a young silversmith at Tiffany & Co. to become a crucial postwar designer and founder of one of the top design consultancies in America: Peter Muller-Munk Associates (PMMA).

Beginning with Muller-Munk’s remarkable Art Deco silver, the exhibition also features his best-known designs: the streamlined Normandie pitcher and Waring waterfall blender. But the revelation comes in his previously undocumented work: cameras, radios, cocktail shakers, power tools, and refrigerators; and total environments for gas stations, international expositions, and mass-transit vehicles. PMMA’s contributions to public projects like the famous Unisphere for the 1964 World’s Fair have been overlooked for decades. The firm counted Alcoa, Bayer, Bell & Howell, Bissell, Mellon Bank, Pittsburgh-Corning, Silex, SOHIO, Texaco, US Steel, Waring, and Westinghouse among its scores of national clients.

Silver to Steel reestablishes Muller-Munk’s position as one of the preeminent industrial designers of the mid-20th century and provides visitors the opportunity to explore the impact of good design on everyday life.

 

Jane Haskell’s Modernism: A Pittsburgh Legacy
November 21, 2015–March 7, 2016
Gallery One

Johannes Molzahn; Grundriß der Mechanik und Festigkeitslehre, 1921; etching on Van Gelder Zonen wove paper; Edward N. Haskell Family Acquisition Fund, Carnegie Museum of Art

Johannes Molzahn; Grundriß der Mechanik und Festigkeitslehre, 1921; etching on Van Gelder Zonen wove paper; Edward N. Haskell Family Acquisition Fund, Carnegie Museum of Art

Artist, collector, advocate, and patron, Jane Haskell (1923–2013) was an influential presence in Pittsburgh for more than 40 years. Her own artwork, as well as the objects she collected and commissioned for her home, reveal her particular take on Modernism and abiding interest in experimentation with color, line, light, and form. As a board member and donor, Haskell helped Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) collect more than 50 works that reflect crucial international developments in abstract art over the course of the 20th century, including pieces by Kazimir Malevich, Vassily Kandinsky, Carlo Carrà, El Lissitzky, Pablo Picasso, Frank Stella, Eva Hesse, Richard Long, and Dan Flavin. Jane Haskell’s Modernism presents these important works, as well as drawings of and objects from Haskell’s residence designed by Pittsburgh-based architect Herbert Seigle. Framing Haskell’s art practice through the lens of artists she admired, the exhibition also illuminates her tremendous impact within the city’s art community and especially at CMOA.

Jane Haskell’s Modernism is presented as a complement to Jane Haskell: Drawing in Light, an exhibition of art by Haskell at the American Jewish Museum, October 20, 2015–February 19, 2016.

 

Support

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art

Carnegie Museum of Art, founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895, is nationally and internationally recognized for its collection of fine and decorative art from the 19th to 21st centuries. The collection also contains important holdings of Japanese and old master prints. Founded in 1896, the Carnegie International is one of the longest-running surveys of contemporary art worldwide. The Heinz Architectural Center, part of Carnegie Museum of Art, is dedicated to enhancing understanding of the built environment through its exhibitions, collections, and public programs. The Hillman Photography Initiative serves as a living laboratory for exploring the rapidly changing field of photography. For more information about Carnegie Museum of Art, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, call 412.622.3131 or visit our website at www.cmoa.org

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