Carnegie International Highlights Five Projects

Contact

Emily Willson
Carnegie Museum of Art
willsone@cmoa.org
412.622.3328

Jen Joy
Sutton
jen@suttonpr.com
212.202.3402

New Works by Artists Across the Globe from Ho Chi Minh City to the American Southwest to Pittsburgh

Carnegie International: October 13 – March 25, 2019
Press & VIP Preview Day: October 12, 2018

Press & VIP accreditation now open.

Please visit our press resources for images and further information.

Pittsburgh, PA (June 21, 2018) The opening of Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018 is four months out, and 32 artists and artist collectives are busy composing and constructing their contributions in time for the October 13 opening. Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is pleased to preview five works in progress that represent the expansiveness and particularity of the exhibition to come.

Zoe Leonard, 'Prologue: El Rio / The River,' 2018, C-prints. © Zoe Leonard, Courtesy the artist, Hauser & Wirth and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.

Zoe Leonard, ‘Prologue: El Rio / The River,’ 2018, C-prints. © Zoe Leonard, Courtesy the artist, Hauser & Wirth and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.

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crossroads banner conner

New Contemporary Galleries at CMOA open July 20

June 26, 2018

Contact:
Jonathan Gaugler
gauglerj@cmoa.org
412.688.8690

Emily Willson
willsone@cmoa.org
412-622-3328

Crossroads mines collection for diversity, depth, and eccentricities
High resolution press images are available.

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces Crossroads: Carnegie Museum of Art’s Collection, 1945 to Now, a major reinstallation of the museum’s galleries dedicated to postwar and contemporary art. Opening to the public on July 20, Crossroads mines the collection’s depth, diversity, and eccentricities, situating the work of artists at the intersections of history, society, politics, and biography. Instead of a strictly chronological hang, each gallery represents a chapter in the larger story of CMOA’s world-class collection.

Guerrilla Girls, 'You're seeing less than half the picture,' 1989, offset laser or inkjet print poster, Carnegie Museum of Art, Alan D. and Marsha W. Bramowitz Contemporary Print Acquisition Fund

Guerrilla Girls, ‘You’re seeing less than half the picture,’ 1989, offset laser or inkjet print poster, Carnegie Museum of Art, Alan D. and Marsha W. Bramowitz Contemporary Print Acquisition Fund

“Andrew Carnegie’s mandate to acquire the art of our time has resulted in a collection that is more than the sum of its parts,” says Eric Crosby, CMOA’s Richard Armstrong Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. “I hope Crossroads will allow visitors to see art of the recent past through the lens of the present and to connect with themes and stories that resonate today.”

The modern and contemporary galleries are currently closed as they undergo a complete transformation. Visitors will be invited to preview the new collection galleries as part of CMOA’s Third Thursday celebration on July 19.

Crossroads features some 150 works ranging from familiar masterpieces by Alberto Giacometti, Willem de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, and Mark Rothko to recent acquisitions in painting, sculpture, and photography. Many works have never been seen before in CMOA’s collection galleries, including Kerry James Marshall’s Untitled (Gallery) (2016) and Alex Katz’s Vivien Baseball Cap (2006), a recent gift by the artist. Joining these new acquisitions are works by Pope.L, Torey Thornton, Avery Singer, Michael Williams, Lorraine O’Grady, and Tseng Kwong Chi.

Pope.L, 'Fountain (reparations version),' 2016-2017, acrylic, oil, oil stick, chalk, and chewing gum on porcelain fountain, Carnegie Museum of Art, A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund, © Pope.L, Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NY

Pope.L, ‘Fountain (reparations version),’ 2016-2017, acrylic, oil, oil stick, chalk, and chewing gum on porcelain fountain, Carnegie Museum of Art, A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund, © Pope.L, Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NY

Other highlights on view include: Black Crowd (1954), a masterpiece by the Chinese émigré painter Zao Wou-Ki; Green Thought (1958), a recently conserved work by the color field painter Morris Louis from his iconic Veil series; Gordon Matta-Clark’s Conical Intersect (1975), a recently digitized film documenting the artist’s challenging architectural interventions in Paris; a rarely-exhibited large-scale 1981 painting by Keith Haring; a collection of posters by the Guerrilla Girls, the feminist collective who defined art as activism in the 1980s; and Louise Bourgeois’s Cell II (1991), a mysterious installation of found objects presented in the 1991 Carnegie International.

Crossroads unfolds in a series of “chapters,” beginning with the work that gives the installation its title: Bruce Conner’s 1976 film CROSSROADS. The film is a hypnotic and troubling collage of US military atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll in 1946. These devastating blasts signal a disruptive turning point in history, and the beginning of the postwar collection.

Bruce Conner, 'CROSSROADS,' 1976, 35mm, black/white, sound, 37min. Digitally Restored, 2013. Original Music by Patrick Gleeson and Terry Riley. Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive, Courtesy UCLA Film & Television Archive and Conner Family Trust, (c) Conner Family Trust

Bruce Conner, ‘CROSSROADS,’ 1976, 35mm, black/white, sound, 37min. Digitally Restored, 2013. Original Music by Patrick Gleeson and Terry Riley. Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive, Courtesy UCLA Film & Television Archive and Conner Family Trust, (c) Conner Family Trust

“Conner’s rapturous film is a meditation on the cataclysmic events that have shaped human life since World War II,” Crosby says. “His notion of a ‘crossroads’ is an evocative metaphor for us, one that underscores the pivotal decisions artists make and amplifies the relevance of CMOA’s collection today.”

Each of the eight chapters foregrounds artistic decision-making as an urgent and powerful form of thinking in the world. These chapters include:

A New Horizon – Prompted by new artistic freedoms and a shifting global order following World War II, artists of the 1950s respond with innovative forms of abstraction in painting and sculpture.

Call of the Wild – In the late 1940s, a loose-knit band of northern European painters and poets called CoBrA experimented with art that was mischievous, playful, and irreverent. The gallery reintroduces CMOA’s extensive, rarely exhibited CoBrA collection.

More than Minimal – Though Minimalist works of the 1960s and 1970s may seem cold and impersonal, behind each is a story of touch, perception, and lived experience, lending a human dimension to otherwise simplified forms.

Night Poetry – Borrowing its title from a 1962 painting by the Pittsburgh-born artist Raymond Saunders, this dream-like gallery summons rarely seen works from the darker recesses of the collection.

Abstract, dark canvas with a single flower blossoming in among dark paint

Raymond Jennings Saunders, ‘Night Poetry,’ 1962, oil on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Leland and Mary Hazard, © Raymond Saunders

Artists’ Cinema – Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, the museum served as a hub for a vibrant local film community. This gallery features a rotating program of important and under-recognized works from the museum’s collection.

Less Than Half the Picture – The turmoil of the 1980s prompted widespread debate about of the value and role of art in society. A new generation of artists embraced politically charged ways of working in response to the most vital issues of the day.

The Persistence of Painting –  From the rise of the internet to the ubiquity of digital cameras, today’s complex visual environment has pushed a centuries-old medium in unpredictable directions.

Free Radicals – How do artists locate themselves in our complex world? How do they redress historical omissions? How do they embody forms of resistance and protest? And how do they challenge tradition and the status quo?

Crossroads embraces a modular rather than chronological structure. This approach permits curators to refresh galleries in the future through new rotations and themes. Drawing from its broad collection, CMOA’s contemporary program will continue to surface ideas and stories that speak to our rapidly changing world.

Acting co-director and chief curator Catherine Evans says, “CMOA has an incredible collection, yet we are only able to present a sliver of it at any time. Crossroads signals a renewed energy for these galleries, and its format creates opportunities to do some deep digging into our holdings to prompt new perspectives and conversations. In 2019, we’re excited to bring more innovative approaches to engaging our visitors in our collection spaces.”

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another.
We believe creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences.

Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018

Artists Announced for Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018

Contact

Emily Willson
Carnegie Museum of Art
willsone@cmoa.org
412.622.3328

Jen Joy
Sutton
jen@suttonpr.com
212.202.3402

Pittsburgh, PA…Curator Ingrid Schaffner announced today the artists in Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018 which runs October 13, 2018–March 25, 2019 at Carnegie Museum of Art. Established in 1896, the Carnegie International exhibitions have built a rich history of introducing audiences to contemporary art from around the world. The 2018 Carnegie International will feature:

Yuji Agematsu
El Anatsui
Art Labor with Joan Jonas
Huma Bhabha
Mel Bochner
Mimi Cherono Ng’ok
Lenka Clayton and Jon Rubin
Sarah Crowner
Alex Da Corte
Tacita Dean
Jeremy Deller
Kevin Jerome Everson
Han Kang and IM Heung-soon
Leslie Hewitt
Saba Innab
Karen Kilimnik
Zoe Leonard
Kerry James Marshall
Park McArthur
Josiah McElheny with John Corbett and Jim Dempsey
Ulrike Müller
Thaddeus Mosley
The Otolith Group
Postcommodity
Jessi Reaves
Abel Rodriguez
Rachel Rose
Beverly Semmes
Dayanita Singh
Lucy Skaer
Tavares Strachan
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
and
“Dig Where You Stand,” by independent exhibition maker Koyo Kouoh

With 32 artists and artist collectives, the exhibition invites visitors to explore what it means to be “international” at this moment in time, and to experience museum joy. The pleasure of being with art and other people is integral to the composition of this International—a series of encounters with contemporary art inside the world of the Carnegie Museum. Among the new and ambitious projects are: an unprecedented collaboration between novelist Han Kang and filmmaker IM Heung-soon; an exhibition-within-the-exhibition curated by Koyo Kouoh that draws from the museum’s collection; and an interpretation of rejected works from the history of the Carnegie International by Lenka Clayton and Jon Rubin. Other components of the International include a mapping of Pittsburgh through photography in the museum’s Teenie Harris Archive, one of the most detailed and intimate records of the black urban experience, and the Cinémathèque series of film screenings. The 57th edition also builds upon a long legacy of research and collecting by Carnegie Museum of Art.

The 57th Carnegie International artists include:
1 independent exhibition-maker
6 art collectives and collaborators
13 individual artists who use the pronoun “he”
18 individual artists who use the pronoun “she”
20 artists who live in the US
3 artists who live in Asia
5 artists who live in Europe
2 artists who live in Africa
1 artist who lives in South America
1 artist who lives in the Middle East

National affiliations by residence and birth: Austria, Bahamas, Cameroon, Cherokee Nation, Colombia, England, Germany, Ghana, India, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Kuwait, Lebanon, Navajo Nation, Nigeria, Nonuya Nation, Pakistan, Palestine, Scotland, Senegal, Switzerland, United States of America, and Vietnam.

Programming
The International is already underway with an array of programs and publications. The ongoing Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions, conducted by artists and other participants in the exhibition, welcome the public to explore contemporary art through drawing, mapping, writing, doodling, and other improvisations. Past sessions have been led by Schaffner, Art Labor, Maira Kalman, Prem Krishnamurthy, Thaddeus Mosley, and Dayanita Singh. They will continue, from this weekend’s zine-making workshop by Mimi Cherono Ng’ok, through the run of the exhibition.

In addition, the International has launched KEYWORD: INTERNATIONAL, a catalyst for creative research and conversation in collaboration with the Kelly Strayhorn Theater. Twenty arts activators will receive micro-grants to support research projects that define Pittsburgh as an international city. On October 20, 2018, fellows will present their findings during a daylong symposium that will be published in the exhibition’s catalogue.

For more information on public programs please see: https://2018.carnegieinternational.org/programs/

The Curator
Curator Ingrid Schaffner and Associate Curator Liz Park are available for interview. Schaffner’s process started with a series of research trips with five curator colleagues as her traveling and thinking Companions: Magalí Arriola, Doryun Chong, Ruba Katrib, Carin Kuoni, and Bisi Silva. Each Companion traveled with Schaffner to places new to both of them. This research shaped not only Schaffner’s work on the International, but also the Companion’s work in the field at large. A series of Travelogues published on the International’s website offers a window into this process: https://blog.cmoa.org/tag/the-travelogue-series/.

Support
Major support for Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018 has been provided by the Carnegie International Endowment, The Fine Foundation, and the Keystone Friends of the 2018 Carnegie International. Additional major support is provided by the Friends of the 2018 Carnegie International, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Louisa S. Rosenthal Family Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, please call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Visions of Order and Chaos Programming Includes PSO Collaboration

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art announces events and programming for its upcoming exhibition, Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye. We are thrilled to host a series of in-gallery music events in collaboration with Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. These evening events pair the music and visual art of the Enlightenment, and take place three times over the course of the show.

Visions of Order and Chaos packs CMOA’s Heinz Galleries with over 200 works from its 1750–1850 holdings. Through extensive research and conservation efforts, we’re able to showcase 75% works which have never before exhibited at the museum. The exhibition shares artist’s visions of a world rapidly becoming modern, and shaped by explosive debates.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye
March 3–June 24, 2018
Heinz Galleries, Carnegie Museum of Art

Ary Scheffer, 'Dante and Virgil Encountering the Shades of Francesca da Rimini and Paolo Malatesta in the Underworld,' 1851, oil on canvas, Heinz Family Fund and Anonymous gift

Ary Scheffer, ‘Dante and Virgil Encountering the Shades of Francesca da Rimini and Paolo Malatesta in the Underworld,’ 1851, oil on canvas, Heinz Family Fund and Anonymous gift

Related Programming
For ticketing and more information, please visit our website or call 412.622.3288

 Member Preview
March 3, 10 a.m.–12 p.m.
Our members get an exclusive preview of Visions of Order and Chaos on its opening day!

Third Thursday: Toga
March 15, 8:00 pm–11:00 pm
Two words: TOGA PARTY. Beware the Ides of March! Dust off your curtains, wash those sheets, and get wrapped up for an adults-only (18+) party for the ages!

Enjoy activities throughout the evening, including:

  • Et tu, Thursday? Get a tour of Visions of Order and Chaos, our exhibition exploring the Age of Enlightenment (it’s full of togas and treachery!)
  • Floral and laurel crown making with WorkshopPGH to match your toga
  • UPMC Health Plan lounge with giveaways and some surprise healthy treats
  • Disco dance party with DJ Jarrett Tebbets
  • Plinth posing selfie station — work your inner statue
  • Performances by WVU’s West African Drum Ensemble, part of the National Council of Ceramic Arts (NCECA) annual convention
  • Demonstrations of ceramic making from NCECA

 

In-gallery Music with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
March 22, April 12, and May 10
5:30 pm–8:00 pm
Don’t miss CMOA and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra bringing you the sights and sounds of the Enlightenment era! Visit our new exhibition, Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye for a special in-gallery music series on three different evenings. Just drop in for informal, intriguing conversations on art and music, free with admission. PSO musicians will perform music from the 18th and 19th centuries among period works of art. We’ll explore a different theme each month.

March 22
A cello quartet will play a Classical piece followed by a modern/pop piece that was influenced by the Classical composer.

April 12
PSO musicians play a selection of Beethoven in response to one of the exhibition’s central questions: “Can Empires Survive?”

May 10
Soprano Katy Williams will sing a selection of the Polish works by Chopin.
Anne Williams, principal cellist, will play a few short pieces by Robert Schumann.

While you’re here, stop by the bar for an opportunity to exchange ideas with curator Lulu Lippincott and researcher Costas Karakatsanis.

 

For more information and images, please contact Jonathan Gaugler.

 

Support
Generous support for this exhibition is provided by The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, the Richard C. von Hess Foundation, the Gailliot Family Foundation, and Ritchie Battle. Additional support is provided by the Mary Louise and Henry J. Gailliot Fund for Exhibitions, the Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund, Martha Malinzak, and The European Fine Art Foundation.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
CMOA creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. We believe that creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world in order to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Acclaimed photographer Deana Lawson shows never-before-seen works in new exhibition

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Deana Lawson
March 15–July 15, 2018
Forum Gallery

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) presents Deana Lawson, a new exhibition of never-before-shown photographs by Lawson (b. 1979). The Brooklyn-based artist’s growing body of work addresses critical issues surrounding representations of African Americans and the African diaspora. The exhibition is the 80th edition of CMOA’s dynamic Forum series, uninterrupted since 1990, bringing the work of extraordinary artists to Pittsburgh.

Deana Lawson, 'Nation,' 2017, © 2018 Deana Lawson

Deana Lawson, ‘Nation,’ 2017, inkjet print, © 2018 Deana Lawson

Few photographers working today unpack complexities of race and identity like Deana Lawson. Her strikingly-arranged portraits are packed with details that invite contemplation and close inspection. Lawson depicts people and interiors she encounters in her daily routines and travels, from her own neighborhood in Brooklyn to Soweto, South Africa, and beyond. She also appropriates photographs from other sources to address depictions of African Americans in media and visual culture. The exhibition includes 10 photographs, printed in the largest size ever for the artist. Their life-size scale affords scrutiny of the carpeting, clothing, furniture, hair, and jewelry that impact our perceptions—and perhaps biases—about people and their stories.

Deana Lawson also features photographic installations that burst out of the traditional picture frame and onto the exhibition walls. Lawson taps a variety of sources, including mass media and photo libraries, to explore how images in contemporary visual culture shape perceptions and stereotypes of people and communities.  Each one is site-specific to CMOA and meticulously assembled by the artist in response to the museum and its local context.

We invite everyone to meet Deana Lawson and exhibition curator Dan Leers at the opening reception. The event is on March 15 at 7 p.m., and is free to the public. The museum’s monthly Third Thursday series follows from 8–11 p.m.

CMOA’s Forum series hosts diverse artists working on innovative projects in our Forum Gallery, located in the main lobby of the museum. For over 25 years, the series has offered our curators a dynamic space to show new developments in contemporary art.

Deana Lawson is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography at Carnegie Museum of Art.

 

Major funding for the Forum series is generously provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation. Additional support for this exhibition is provided by the Marty McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another.
We believe creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences.

Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.