William Henry Fox Talbot (English, 1800–1877) "Lace," early 1840s, salted paper print from a photogenic drawing negative, 8 15/16 x 7 3/8 in. (22.7 x 18.7 cm) image; 9 x 7 7/16 in. (22.9 x 18.8 cm) sheet
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Purchased with funds provided by The William Talbott Hillman Foundation. 2017.2.1

Carnegie Museum of Art presents exhibition of William Henry Fox Talbot Photographs

The largest Talbot show in years, will include 16 new acquisitions

William Henry Fox Talbot and the Promise of Photography
November 18, 2017–February 11, 2018
Gallery One, Carnegie Museum of Art

Featuring more than 30 works by William Henry Fox Talbot (British, 1800–1877) and his circle from its own collection and from important public and private lenders, CMOA presents the largest US exhibition of Talbot’s photography in the last 15 years. In addition, 16 of the photographs on view will be recent acquisitions or promised gifts to the museum.

A group of people sitting and reclining in the grass. Behind them, stone wall with ivy and shrubs

William Henry Fox Talbot, Rev. Calvert Richard Jones, “The Fruit Sellers,” before December 13, 1845, salted paper print from a calotype negative, H: 6 11/16 x W: 8 1/4 in. image, Gift of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation

A true “gentleman scientist” of the Victorian period, Talbot combined his knowledge of chemistry, mathematics, and optics, with his interest in art, botany, and classics to invent the paper-based photography that dominated the field for most of the 19th and 20th centuries. Due to the fragile nature of the photographs, exhibitions of Talbot’s work are rare. This represents the first time ever that any of these photographs will be on view in Pittsburgh.

Talbot’s first documented experiments from 1839 and 1840 consisted of “photogenic drawings,” what we now call photograms. Talbot would place an object directly on a piece of paper sensitized with silver salts and leave it to expose in the sun. The results are impressions of leaves, flowers, and pieces of lace that are beautiful compositionsthat have other potential uses. Talbot understood that these early photographs could produce a botanical drawing faster and more accurately than ever before, and could instantly and endlessly reproduce lace patterns to facilitate manufacturing during the boom of the Industrial Revolution. Two of CMOA’s recent acquisitions, Buckler Fern and Leaves and Flowers of a Plant were created during this time, and represent some of the first photographs on paper ever made.

In 1841, Talbot patented the “calotype” process, a direct precursor to the positive and negative in darkroom photography that persists today.  The calotype allowed for picture-making in low-light conditions and with shorter exposure times meaning that interiors and portraits were possible.  Talbot relished this expanded subject matter, making photographs around his Lacock Abbey estate of family and friends.  Eventually, he even brought his equipment abroad to make pictures in other parts of Britain and the European continent.

Talbot’s final innovations in photography entailed his incorporation of photographs into printed books.  The reproducibility of his calotypes—and his photoglyphic and photographic engravings which printed images in ink—represented an entirely new way of disseminating pictures. Contemporary photographers continue to grapple with capturing, fixing, and sharing an image in the digital era. As a result, Talbot’s work feels as relevant today as it did 175 years ago.

William Henry Fox Talbot and the Promise of Photography is organized by Dan Leers, Curator of Photography at Carnegie Museum of Art.

Exhibition Catalogue
The exhibition will be accompanied by a beautiful, small-format book that serves as a primer on the work of William Henry Fox Talbot and his circle, featuring an introductory essay by curator Dan Leers and thematic groupings elucidated by noted Talbot scholar Larry Schaaf. With its luminous reproductions of Talbot’s fragile works, this publication demonstrates that early photography required a form of magic-making and innovation that continues to inspire people today.

Dan Leers, with contributions by Larry J. Schaaf
William Henry Fox Talbot and the Promise of Photography
10 x 8 3/8 in.; Hardcover; 96 pages; 50 illustrations
Retail price: $25
Published by Carnegie Museum of Art
Available October 2017 from D.A.P./Artbook and the CMOA Store

Please visit press.cmoa.org for a selection of high-resolution images from the exhibition.

Support
Support for the exhibition is generously provided by the William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces the Opening Date of the 57th Carnegie International

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 20, 2017

Justin Conner
Justin@hellothirdeye.com
917.609.8499

Jonathan Gaugler
gauglerj@cmoa.org
412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Carnegie International to Open October 12, 2018

Programming and Artist Site Visits Happening Now

Thaddeus Mosley, Art Labor with Joan Jonas, and Mimi Cherono Ng’ok announced as participating artists

Pittsburgh, PA… Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is pleased to announce that the Carnegie International, 57th edition, 2018, curated by Ingrid Schaffner, will open October 12, 2018, and run through March 25, 2019. However, the International is already under way, with expanding research and creative documentation along with a highly-crafted schedule of programs, commissioned essays, and participating artists coming to Pittsburgh for immersive visits. As part of Schaffner’s interest in making the research process accessible and evolving. New York-based design firm Project Projects has built an online portal for the International, at cmoa.org/carnegieintl.

The Carnegie International online portal serves as a living, accumulating document, where viewers can read Travelogues by writer and critic Emmanuel Iduma and artist Maira Kalman, based on the research trips taken by Schaffner. The Travelogues make visible the spirit of research and travel leading up to the International, inviting writers to add their own voice, interpretation, and experience to the process. Future Travelogues by Pico Iyer, among others, will be added in the coming months, each chronicling Schaffner’s travels with a curator companion to a region he or she had never visited before. The companions were Doryun Chong, Chief Curator at M+, Hong Kong; Ruba Katrib, Curator of SculptureCenter, New York; Carin Kuoni, Director of the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, The New School, New York; Bisi Silva, Founder and Artistic Director of the Centre for Contemporary Art, Lagos; and Magalí Arriola, a Mexico City-based independent curator.

“I was thinking about the Carnegie Museums’ identity as a research institute, and thought that offered a useful model,” said Schaffner. “The colleagues I traveled with are not co-curators but thinking partners. By supporting their work in the field, the International has helped build new networks of artists and curators around the world.”

Back in Pittsburgh, Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions have begun. In a nod to the heritage of founder Andrew Carnegie (a tam-o’-shanter is a traditional Scottish beret), CMOA has held these art classes for young people since 1929. Schaffner has retuned the format to create a programmatic thread leading up to and throughout the exhibition.  The public programs are conducted by artists and organizers of the International, who connect their work and participants through improvisational acts of drawing. Each session is unique. Skill is not required to map, mark, doodle, render, cartoon, write, or otherwise participate in these open-ended gatherings. This program underscores Schaffner’s commitment to unpacking the history of the International as an evolving exhibition concept.

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Architecture, Technology collide in Copy + Paste

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.216.7909

Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture
October 14, 2017–May 6, 2018
The Heinz Architectural Center Galleries + Hall of Architecture

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture, an eight-month investigation into the museum’s spectacular Hall of Architecture. Visitors to the Hall are constantly wowed by the nearly 150 building facades, monuments, and fragments from across the Western World. What many people don’t realize is that this collection is entirely plaster copies, painstakingly cast and reassembled in 1906–1907. It is the only remaining collection of its type in the US, and one of Pittsburgh’s most iconic spaces.

Over the course of Copy + Paste, curators, technologists, students, architects, and artists will test new ways of presenting information about this special collection. Activities in The Heinz Architectural Center and the Hall range from augmented reality and 3D printing to creative interventions and hands-on activities. The Hall is a mash-up of geography, styles, and periods, so contextualizing and presenting rich content is a priority for Copy + Paste organizer Alyssum Skjeie.

A screen held up to an architectural column displays text information about that object, showing both the column and text on the screen.

Courtesy of Francesca Torello and Josh Bard

Copy + Paste activities and visitor feedback will inform future efforts to create a dynamic, active, and inspiring Hall. These activities include:

  • Plaster Re-Cast – Experience the Hall of Architecture with a new augmented-reality app, by Francesca Torello and Josh Bard from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), School of Architecture. See this impressive cast collection in a new light through interactive historical content and virtual 3D models of the original buildings
  • CMU Architecture Studio – professor of architecture Joshua Bard leads a studio exploring the material culture of architectural plaster, examining its historic importance and possible future robotic applications. Students will work in the exhibition galleries, and their resulting experiments will join the Copy + Paste presentation.
  • CopyShop – a space for creative thinking and making inspired by the Hall of Architecture, the Copy Shop hosts visitor activities designed by invited makerspace expert Jennifer Grayburn in collaboration with the CMOA Education and Exhibition departments.
  • Archival Materials – new digitization efforts make available historic documents on the Hall of Architecture’s original 1907 design, the creation of the casts themselves, and the ideals of creating a grand study collection for people who could not travel. Some of the most intriguing items will be on view in the exhibition, with periodic rotations.

Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture is organized by Alyssum Skjeie, program manager, The Heinz Architectural Center.

HACLab is a project of CMOA’s Heinz Architectural Center. Each Lab invites creative thinkers to design dynamic experiences investigating architecture in Pittsburgh and beyond. The projects are fluid, experimental, and evolve using visitor participation and feedback. We hope that HACLabs offer visitors a new appreciation of human encounters with the built environment.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Ian Cheng’s Artificially-Intelligent Art at CMOA

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Opening September 22, 2017
Forum Gallery, Carnegie Museum of Art

Ian Cheng, Emissary Sunsets The Self, 2017, live simulation and story, infinite duration, sound, Courtesy of the artist, Pillar Corrias London, and Standard (Oslo)

Ian Cheng, Emissary Sunsets The Self, 2017, live simulation and story, infinite duration, sound, Courtesy of the artist, Pilar Corrias London, and Standard (Oslo)

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces a solo exhibition by Ian Cheng (b. 1984). Cheng presents Emissary Sunsets The Self, an open-ended digital simulation displayed on a massive, 13 foot-wide LED screen in CMOA’s Forum Gallery. The artist is best known for his digital simulation works that draw on his background in cognitive science and employ rudimentary forms of artificial intelligence (AI). Coding these unpredictable animated worlds from the ground up, he uses the language of video games to probe complex themes such as evolution, human behavior, and the history of consciousness.

Emissary Sunsets The Self is the third work in the artist’s Emissaries trilogy (2015–2017). Each simulation in the series—set on the same volcanic site separated by thousands of years—explores a pivotal moment in Cheng’s interpretation of cognitive evolution, past and future. His protagonists, or Emissaries, are equipped with a unique AI composed of multiple competing inner models, allowing them to shape—and be shaped by—their strange environments as they work to accomplish narrative tasks.

“In each episode,” Cheng writes, “the Emissary—caught between unraveling old realities and emerging weird ones—attempts to achieve a series of deterministic narrative goals, an analogy to the narrative nature of consciousness. But crucially these goals can be set off course, procrastinated, disrupted by the underlying simulation and its non-narrative agents who vex the Emissary with other kinds of minds.”

Ian Cheng, Emissary Sunsets The Self, 2017, live simulation and story, infinite duration, sound, Courtesy of the artist, Pillar Corrias London, and Standard (Oslo)

Ian Cheng, Emissary Sunsets The Self, 2017, live simulation and story, infinite duration, sound, Courtesy of the artist, Pillar Corrias London, and Standard (Oslo)

Emissary Sunsets The Self takes place many millennia in the future on a volcanic atoll now under the control of MotherAI. We observe the confrontation between radical mutations in the sentient atoll and the local inhabitants who were long ago engineered to immunize the landscape from monstrous deviations.

Read about the Emissaries series, including narratives,  technical overview, and behavior diagrams, at the artist’s website.

Support
This exhibition is made possible through the generous support of AVS, Ltd.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Pittsburgh Filmmaker Documents First Openly Transgender NYC Firefighter

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Woman on Fire Pittsburgh Premiere is August 25 at CMOA

Woman on Fire – Pittsburgh Premiere
August 25, 7–10 p.m.
Carnegie Museum of Art Theater
$15 ($10 members and students)

Brooke Guinan sitting on a seat inside a firetruck, examining her firegighter's helmet. Other equipment lies on the seat beside her.

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art announces the Pittsburgh premiere of Woman on Fire, a film by Pittsburgh-based filmmaker Julie Sokolow. Woman on Fire tells the story of Brooke Guinan, the first openly transgender firefighter in New York City. In addition to the challenges of transitioning in the department’s macho profession, the film examines Guinan’s relationship to Jim Baker, her boyfriend of two years.

The film premiered at DOC NYC, America’s largest documentary film festival, in November 2016. Chirlane McCray, The First Lady of NYC, introduced the screening. In May 2017, the film won Best Documentary by Audience at Geena Davis’s Bentonville Film Festival. This past June, the Brooklyn-based distribution company FilmRise announced that it had acquired worldwide rights to Woman on Fire.

Guinan and Baker will attend the screening, as will Sokolow, producer Danny Yourd, and members of Animal, the Pittsburgh-based production company. After the screening, the museum hosts a Q&A with Sokolow, Guinan, and Baker followed by a reception.

About Woman on Fire

In February 2015, The Village Voice heralded the arrival of “New York’s Bravest”—Brooke Guinan, the first openly transgender firefighter in New York City. As a third-generation firefighter, Brooke has a passion for heroism that runs in her blood. Her father George is a respected lieutenant and 9/11 survivor with a 35-year legacy in the FDNY. People always asked Brooke if she would follow in her father’s footsteps. But when Brooke transitions from male to female in her father’s workplace, it poses not only a challenge to a macho profession, but also to the customs of the people she cares about the most—her traditional family.

Meanwhile, Brooke’s boyfriend of two years, Jim, struggles to come out to his family. A wise-cracking Air Force veteran, Jim still hasn’t told his mother that Brooke is a transwoman. Brooke and Jim realize that having the life they want means being vulnerable in the face of judgment. As we watch the couple buy a house together and consider marriage, we reconsider what it means to be man and woman, gay and straight, traditional and nontraditional. A heartfelt portrait of change in the American family and workplace, Woman on Fire is a testament to love, courage, and loyalty.

Press Quotes

Woman on Fire is “just what a great social awareness doc should be — equal parts heartwarming and infuriating.” —The Village Voice

Woman on Fire is a moving portrait of a New Yorker who’s never been afraid to run where she needs to go, regardless of the dangers that might be waiting for her on the other side.” —Indiewire

Woman on Fire‘s subject Brooke Guinan is “a superhero for the 21st century.” —Salon

Julie Sokolow
Director Julie Sokolow’s films have appeared at the New York Times, Time, and Huffington Post. She is the creator of the Healthy Artists documentary series, which profiles over 40 uninsured artists who struggle to afford health care. Her feature film directorial debut Aspie Seeks Love won Best Documentary at the 2015 Cinequest Film Festival and gained acclaim in Vice, Filmmaker, and Salon. Two years in the making, Woman on Fire is her second feature film.

Danny Yourd
Producer Danny Yourd is a creative producer at the production company Animal, based in Pittsburgh, PA. He produced Almost Holy, executive-produced by Terrence Malick, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2015 and recently enjoyed a theatrical run. He also produced Blood Brother, which won both the Audience Award and Grand Jury Awards at Sundance in 2013.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.