Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art announces its first major exhibition of its 1750–1850 holdings, Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye. The exhibition packs CMOA’s Heinz Galleries with over 200 popular and never-before-seen works. It shares artist’s visions of a world rapidly becoming modern, and shaped by explosive debates: Does religion have a role in public life? Should we redistribute wealth to the poor? Can women fully participate in democracy? Can public education produce good citizens? All remain hot-button issues today.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye
March 3–June 24, 2018
Heinz Galleries

Ary Scheffer, 'Faust in His Study,' c. 1831, watercolor and gouache on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Fishkoff

Ary Scheffer, ‘Faust in His Study,’ c. 1831, watercolor and gouache on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Fishkoff

Between 1750–1850, the world changed dramatically. Revolutions toppled monarchies, and constitutional democracy took root in the US and France. This was a time of accelerating ideas on liberty and equality challenging social norms. People began to behave in ways we’d recognize today. Portraits depict their subjects in classical costume, just as we would carefully style an Instagram profile or digital avatar. Gorgeous painted fans could send quick messages, signaling romance from across the room. Celebrities behaved badly and artists captured every single episode.

The Enlightenment was a time of reason and order. Scientific breakthroughs and new ways of governing stimulated optimism for making the world better. A portrait by George Romney, ca. 1779–1780, shows an idealized image of his subject in classical garments and pose. An Edward Hicks painting from 1837 depicts a peaceful gathering of European colonists and Native Americans, alongside a menagerie of coexisting animals, a utopian vision of a young United States. Subjects like global trade, scientists at work, and a new recognition of non-Western cultures crept into art.

Edward Hicks, 'The Peaceable Kingdom,' c. 1837, oil on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Bequest of Charles J. Rosenbloom

Edward Hicks, ‘The Peaceable Kingdom,’ c. 1837, oil on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Bequest of Charles J. Rosenbloom

The Romantics challenged notions of rational, orderly societies. Watching as the noble ideals of the French Revolution ended in violent chaos, the Romantics championed emotions and individuals. Miniature portraits of lovers were worn inside of clothes and out of sight. Ary Scheffer’s 1851 masterwork depicts the swirling shades of entwined lovers Francesca and Rimini from Dante’s Inferno. In Caspar David Friedrich’s 1803 print, a forlorn woman contemplates suicide.

Research and restoration projects have yielded several never-before-shown works. Combined with new acquisitions and longtime gallery favorites, the exhibition tells a story of this sensational century. Quotes from writers of the time contextualize the art on view.

Through painting, sculpture, furniture, prints, drawings, and personal objects, The Enlightened Eye shows a Western world in tension between rational order and chaotic abandon. This was one of the most fascinating times in our history, and CMOA invites you to view our world through their eyes.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye is organized by Louise Lippincott, curator of fine art, with additional support from Rachel Delphia and Margaret Powell, department of decorative arts and design.

Support
Generous support for this exhibition is provided by The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, the Richard C. von Hess Foundation, the Gailliot Family Foundation, and Ritchie Battle. Additional support is provided by the Mary Louise and Henry J. Gailliot Fund for Exhibitions, the Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund, Martha Malinzak, and The European Fine Art Foundation.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
CMOA creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. We believe that creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world in order to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

CMOA announces recent acquisitions

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces highlights from its new acquisitions, which were approved on December 14. The museum’s collection includes over 30,000 art objects including painting and sculpture; prints and drawings; photographs; architectural casts, renderings, and models; decorative arts and design; and film, video, and digital imagery.

Several highlights from our December 14 acquisitions include:

Photograph of a shiny steel chair, the steel frame is drawn out and sculpted to the sides like two droopy arms

nendo, ‘Manga chair #49,’ 2016, stainless steel, Edition 2 of 3, Gifts of G. David Thompson, John Baird Hudson and the Hudson Conservancy, and Reverend Alfred Duane Pell, all by exchange, © 2016 nendo, by permission

nendo
Japanese, 2002–present
Manga chair #49, 2016
stainless steel
32 x 45 ¾ x 17 ¼ in.
Edition 2 of 3
Gifts of G. David Thompson, John Baird Hudson and the Hudson Conservancy, and Reverend Alfred Duane Pell, all by exchange
© 2016 nendo, by permission

Grid of small model chairs. Each is distorted or accented in a cartoonish way, showing motion or humorous gestures

nendo, ‘Scale models of 50 Manga chairs,’ 2016, 3-D printed, thermoplastic, Gift of Allan Gerdau, by exchange,© 2016 nendo, by permission

nendo
Japanese, 2002–present
Scale models of 50 Manga chairs, 2016
3-D printed thermoplastic
Dimensions variable, each approx. H: 4 in.
Gift of Allan Gerdau, by exchange
© 2016 nendo, by permission

Manga, or “humorous picture,” is a popular style of Japanese comic book art. The details of characters (eyes, hair, and other body parts) are exaggerated for comedic or dramatic effect. With the group of 50 Manga chairs, design firm nendo mimics the qualities of manga comics. The chairs are happy, distressed, embarrassed, and surprised. CMOA has acquired a full set of 50 1/10 scale models representing each manga chair, along with one full-size chair, Manga chair #49, designed with flopping arms resting humorously at each side.

–Rachel Delphia, The Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design

 

Photograph of a woman wearing a long dress made of white gloves, and a sash, like a beauty pageant contestant

Lorraine O’Grady, ‘Untitled (Mlle Bourgeoise Noire),’ 1980–1983, printed 2009, 14 gelatin silver prints, Second Century Acquisition Fund and the Mr. and Mrs. Peter Denby Fund for Contemporary Art, © Lorraine O’Grady / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Lorraine O’Grady
American, b. 1934
Untitled (Mlle Bourgeoise Noire), 1980–1983, printed 2009
14 gelatin silver prints
15 1/8 x 15 1/8 x 7/8 in. each
Second Century Acquisition Fund and the Mr. and Mrs. Peter Denby Fund for Contemporary Art
© Lorraine O’Grady / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Lorraine O’Grady has been recognized as a significant player both in the fields of conceptual art and feminist art. Untitled (Mlle Bourgeoise Noire) documents her guerrilla performance as the character Mlle Bourgeoise Noire (Miss Black Middle-Class) occupying the space of museum openings where people of color and women have historically been marginalized or excluded. See this work now in 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art in CMOA’s Heinz Galleries.

–Eric Crosby, The Richard Armstrong Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, and Hannah Turpin, curatorial assistant

Cross-section drawing of a building

Peter Salter, ‘Early Sectional Elevation, Walmer Yard Housing, London,’ 2004, Ink, pencil, and acrylic on architectural paper, Drue Heinz Trust

Peter Salter
British, 1947–
Early Sectional Elevation, Walmer Yard Housing, London, 2004
Ink, pencil, and acrylic on architectural paper
11 3/4 x 16 3/4 in
Drue Heinz Trust

Renowned for his meticulous drawings and atmospheric architecture, Peter Salter recently completed four townhouses on Walmer Road in West London. The Heinz Architectural Center is delighted to add to its collection a set of plans and a cross section of this complex project as well as a characteristically poetic working drawing of the lower street façade.

–Raymund Ryan, curator of architecture

Stark image of a leafless tree standing out against a bright sky

William Henry Fox Talbot, ‘Oak Tree in Winter,’ 1842–1843, Salted paper print from a calotype negative, Gift of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation

William Henry Fox Talbot
British, 1800–1877
Oak Tree in Winter, 1842–1843
Salted paper print from a calotype negative
7 11/16 x 6 9/16 in. image
Gift of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation

Considered to be one of the inventors of photography, William Henry Fox Talbot drew on his knowledge of art history, botany, chemistry, and optics to produce the first ever photographic work on paper. The particular choice of subject for this photograph must have come easily; Talbot once wrote, “Old oak trees are very much to my taste.” See this work now in William Henry Fox Talbot and the Promise of Photography in CMOA’s Gallery One.

–Dan Leers, curator of photography

Two people having a conversation, their faces flattened into geometric planes

Max Weber, ‘The Discussion,’ 1918, Graphite and gouache on paper, The Foster Charitable Trust Fund

Max Weber
American, 1881–1961
The Discussion, 1918
Graphite and gouache on paper
8 9/16 x 5 1/2 in.
The Foster Charitable Trust Fund

This is a work of cubist abstraction, but the title tells us there’s more to it. Its line and form and space and color and texture are complex and beautiful; and so, perhaps, is the relationship between two individuals sharing an aperitif and a conversation. I recommended its acquisition for its strength and freshness of color, and because it exemplifies early cubism. In addition, it is the first cubist work in our collection by this important American modernist, and it comes with a Pittsburgh provenance.

–Louise Lippincott, curator of fine art

 

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

 

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Teenie Harris Archivist successfully endowed

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

 

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is thrilled to announce the successful completion of fundraising efforts toward the Teenie Harris Archivist endowment. This $1.5 million campaign ensures that the museum will continue to research and interpret one of its most important collections, the Teenie Harris Archive.

Dominique Luster, CMOA’s current Teenie Harris Archivist, was hired in 2016. “Charles  ‘Teenie’ Harris had no idea, at the time, that he was building what would become one of the most important archives of the 20th-century African American experience,” said Luster. “It is a great honor to share the stories of the thousands captured in the photographs. And this archive still has countless more stories to tell. I’m grateful and excited to see the support for this position, and eager to continue with this amazing body of work.”

Charles "Teenie" Harris, Self-portrait, c. 1938-1945, black and white: Kodak Safety Film, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Charles “Teenie” Harris, Self-portrait, c. 1938-1945, black and white: Kodak Safety Film, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

In a joint statement, co-interim directors Catherine Evans and Sarah Minnaert said, “Teenie Harris is special, to CMOA and to Pittsburgh. Visitors tell us again and again that the photography in the Teenie Harris Archive is a favorite aspect of CMOA’s collection. The sheer size and scope of the archive, and the personal connections many people hold to these images, make this endowed position absolutely essential. We can’t wait to see the discoveries we’ll make.”

About the Teenie Harris Archive
Charles “Teenie” Harris produced nearly 80,000 images of Pittsburgh’s African American community as a photographer for the influential Pittsburgh Courier and as a freelancer. The photographs, taken from the 1930s to the 1970s, capture a period of momentous change for black Americans, and depict a black urban community that, in spite of the segregationist policies and attitudes of midcentury America, was innovative, thriving, and proud. The museum acquired these negatives in 2001 from the Harris estate, and established the Teenie Harris Archive soon afterward. It is one of the most complete records of a single community.

This fundraising drive was kicked off by a $300,000 challenge grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Leadership support was provided by:
Nancy and Milton+ Washington, the Davenport Family Fund, and Cecile M. and Eric N. Springer.

Generous institutional support was provided by:
The Heinz Endowments, Anonymous, PNC Bank Foundation, EQT Foundation, Cohen & Grigsby, P.C., John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and the Massey Charitable Trust.

Dedicated Individual support provided by:
David and Gabriela Porges, Betsy and Doug Branson, Janet and Bill Hunt, Clyde B. Jones III, Nancy and Woody Ostrow, Brian Wongchaowart, Ellen Still Brooks, Christopher Carson and Maria Kast-Carson, Dawn and Chris Fleischner, Margo M. Flood, Charles A. Harris, Greg J. Hohman, Richard V. Gambrell, and the generous partners, employees, and friends of Cohen & Grigsby, P.C.

+deceased

Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this statement do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

 

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Iconic series by master Japanese Print Maker coming to CMOA

First-edition prints of Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road will be on view for the first time in 25 years

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road
March 31–July 8, 2018
Gallery One

Pittsburgh…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces a new exhibition of one of the most celebrated works of Japanese art, the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido by master printmaker Utagawa (Andō) Hiroshige. The series depicts the spectacular landscapes and interesting characters encountered along the journey from Edo (now Tokyo) to the imperial capital Kyoto. Central to the exhibition are CMOA’s prints from the first Hōeidō edition; 55 in total, created between 1831 and 1834. This will be the first time in 25 years that the entire series has been on view at the museum.

The Tokaido road was the most heavily-traveled route between these two important cities, figuring heavily into popular Japanese art and culture in the mid-1800s. Hiroshige made hundreds of images on the subject throughout his career.

Visitors can follow the progress of the journey along the gallery walls, moving from location to location. In a unique twist, visitors will see examples from Hiroshige’s other series on Tokaido—Reisho, Gyosho, Kichizo, and Aritaya editions—to illustrate the artist’s varied approach to the same subject and innovations of vantage point, perspective, and scale. The exhibition will also feature multiple impressions of the same Hōeidō print to demonstrate variations in the color woodblock printing process, stressing the uniqueness of each singular impression. Different representations of the same station will branch out from the main “path” of the Hōeidō set.

Two different impressions of the same print

Hiroshige Andō, 'Mishima,' c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, ‘Mishima,’ c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, 'Mishima,' c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, ‘Mishima,’ c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

“We’re very fortunate to have an amazing collection of Japanese prints at CMOA” said curator Akemi May. “Having Hiroshige in such depth allows us to nerd-out a little and talk about what makes a good print versus a great print. Their sensitivity to light makes them difficult to display year-round, so this will be quite a treat our visitors will surely love.”

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road is organized by Akemi May, Assistant Curator of Fine Art at CMOA.

Support
Major support for this exhibition is provided by the E. Rhodes & Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Bernard S. and Barbara F. Mars Art Exhibition Endowment.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed., 2018 Announces its Commitment to Fair Pay for Participating Artists

December 5, 2017

Contacts:

Justin Conner
Justin@hellothirdeye.com
917.609.8499

Jonathan Gaugler
gauglerj@cmoa.org
412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

 

The International is the first biennial-style exhibition to be certified by W.A.G.E., an artist activist organization

Pittsburgh, PA. – Carnegie Museum of Art is pleased to announce that the Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed.,2018, has been certified by W.A.G.E. (Working Artists and the Greater Economy) as meeting its standards for paying artist fees. The International is the first biennial-style exhibition to become W.A.G.E. Certified. Accordingly, every participating artist or collective will be paid a standard minimum fee—set by W.A.G.E.-for providing content to the exhibition.

As curator Ingrid Schaffner says, “Perhaps the most entrenched barrier to greater equity is the idea that art is a privilege. W.A.G.E.’s activism brings recognition to the work artists do—on top of actually making art!-when they provide content for museums and exhibitions.”

W.A.G.E. is a New York-based activist organization which works to draw attention to economic inequalities that exist in the arts, and to resolve them. W.A.G.E. Certification is a national program that publicly recognizes those nonprofit arts organizations demonstrating a history of, and commitment to, voluntarily paying artist fees that meet minimum payment standards. W.A.G.E. launched its certification program in October of 2014 and has since certified fifty organizations across the U.S.

The Carnegie International’s certification marks an important exception to W.A.G.E.’s own rules.  In a statement from W.A.G.E.: “One of W.A.G.E. Certification’s cardinal rules is that we don’t certify single exhibitions…However, because museums have demonstrated the greatest resistance…we have chosen to bend this rule and approach the reform of large art institutions brick by brick.” W.A.G.E. sees this certification as an important step forward for the cultural field at large: “While this may sound relatively inconsequential, it isn’t. The Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed., 2018’s decision to guarantee evenly distributed remuneration is a rebuke of speculation as a form of payment in the nonprofit sector. It is also an affirmation of art’s value as a common good – one to which both the labor of artists and institutions contribute, and which both must collectively work to maintain.”

To read W.A.G.E.’s full statement on the certification of the Carnegie International, follow this link.

About the 57th Carnegie International
The International will open on October 12, 2018 and run through March 25, 2019. However, the International is already under way, with expanding research and creative documentation along with a highly-crafted schedule of programs, commissioned essays, and participating artists coming to Pittsburgh for immersive visits.

In this spirit of approaching the International as an evolving process, the curators and participating artists have had ongoing discussions about the purpose of such large-format exhibitions. The International is working with the artists to create an exhibition that puts forward a more sustainable model to boost the ability for artistic production and buoy the creative ecosystem among museum, artist, and public.

As the International evolves, stay tuned for news of more artist projects, Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions, Travelogues, and talks on cmoa.org and the International website.

Find CMOA on Facebook at facebook.com/carnegiemuseumofart, on Twitter at @cmoa, or on Instagram at @thecmoa.

About the Carnegie International
Established in 1896 as the Annual Exhibition, the Carnegie International was initially held every fall (with few exceptions) and focused almost solely on painting. By 1955, the show had adopted a triennial schedule and, in 1958, it became known as the Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Paintings and Sculpture, a title it retained until 1970. After an interruption in the 1970s, the exhibition resumed in 1977 and 1979 as the International Series, single-artist shows intended as a parallel to the Nobel Prize for the arts. In 1982, it reappeared under its original triennial survey format as the Carnegie International, and has been mounted every three to five years since. After the Venice Biennale, the Carnegie International is the oldest international survey exhibition in the world.

Support
Major support for the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018 has been provided by the Carnegie International Endowment, The Fine Foundation, and the Keystone Friends of the 2018 Carnegie International. Additional major support is provided by the Friends of the 2018 Carnegie International, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and the Louisa S. Rosenthal Family Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.