Media Archive: Heinz Architectural Center

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Exhibitions and Programming for January–June

Contact
Emily Willson
Carnegie Museum of Art
willsone@cmoa.org
412.622.3328

Pittsburgh, PA (January 9, 2019) Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces four new exhibitions, dynamic social programming, and engaging educational opportunities for 2019. The exhibitions represent a wide range of artistic styles and periods, from decorative arts and design and contemporary art to classic Impressionism favorites.

“I’m proud of the variety this year,” says Henry H.J. Heinz II Acting Co-Director Catherine Evans. “They show the dynamic and varied experiences you can have at a museum—from seeing Ruth Root’s fabulous patterns to studying the serial painting techniques of Monet to learning about the latest breakthroughs in accessibility design. Museums should be a place for discovery and inspiration, and I think 2019 embodies that spirit.”

New Exhibitions

Ruth Root

April 19–August 25
Forum Gallery

The 81st installment of CMOA’s Forum series will debut a new body of work by acclaimed New York–based painter Ruth Root. For the last two decades, Root has fashioned unruly paintings that push the boundaries of the medium and delight in the pleasures of pattern and shape. For this new series, curator Eric Crosby invited Root to mine CMOA’s collection of artworks and design objects as inspiration for her digitally printed fabrics, which suspend irregular sheets of painted plastic. Through a visual dialogue with the museum’s collection, her eye-popping works personify the wonder of painting.

Ruth Root, digital fabric design for Untitled, 2017; Image courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Ruth Root, digital fabric design for Untitled, 2017; Image courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Influencers: The Pritzker Architecture Prize

May 4–September 2
Heinz Architectural Center

Since its establishment in 1979, the Pritzker Architecture Prize has become the most esteemed prize in architecture worldwide; awarded to individual architects for their total body of work, the Pritzker is frequently referred to as the Nobel Prize for Architecture. To mark the prize’s 40th anniversary, Raymund Ryan, curator, Heinz Architectural Center, presents work from the museum’s collection done by Pritzker laureates. Bolstered by several recent acquisitions, these drawings, models, furniture, and photographs are presented in collaboration with the annual summer camp to stimulate the imaginations of museum visitors and camp participants alike.

Hans Hollein, Stadtstruktur (City Structure), 1959, ink on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. 2018.23.

Hans Hollein, Stadtstruktur (City Structure), 1959, ink on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. 2018.23.

Monet and the Modern City

May 25–September 2
Gallery One

Monet and his contemporaries responded to the urban industrial landscape through works that convey the power and promise of modernization. Organized by curator Akemi May, this exhibition contextualizes Monet’s famous Waterloo Bridge series with other artists’ work from the time, exploring Monet’s process of serial painting and the enduring theme of industry in art. Carnegie Museum of Art’s own Waterloo Bridge painting is presented alongside two others from the series, thanks to the Worcester Art Museum and the Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, and captures the range of moods and colors that serial painting can produce. Other notable works include pieces by Camille Pissarro, Jean-Emile Laboureur, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler, which provide a broader frame of reference for the urban industrial landscape as subject.

Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, London, 1903, Carnegie Museum of Art. Acquired through the generosity of the Sarah Mellon Scaife Family. 67.2

Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, London, 1903, Carnegie Museum of Art.
Acquired through the generosity of the Sarah Mellon Scaife Family. 67.2

Access+Ability

June 1–October 6, 2019
Heinz Galleries

Access+Ability highlights some of the extraordinary research and designs developed during the past decade with and by people who span a wide range of physical, cognitive, and sensory abilities. Fueled by demand and advances in research and digital technologies, a proliferation of functional, life-enhancing products is creating unprecedented access. Low-tech designs that assist with daily routines, digital technology like eye-tracking devices for communicating and editing, and sensors that stabilize tremors associated with Parkinson’s disease, plus innovations in all-terrain wheelchairs, are augmenting the potential for people to access the world in ways previously unimaginable. These objects—many of which are still in prototype stage—represent the future of accessibility design.

Access+Ability was organized by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. The CMOA presentation of Access+Ability is organized by Rachel Delphia, the Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design.

Earring Aid, Bedazzled, 2014. Designed by Elana Langer. Swarovski crystals, e6000 glue, hearing aid. Gift of Elana Langer. Photo: © Hanna Agar.

Earring Aid, Bedazzled, 2014. Designed by Elana Langer. Swarovski crystals, e6000 glue, hearing aid. Gift of Elana Langer. Photo: © Hanna Agar.

Ongoing and Educational

Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018.

Open through March 25
Presented by Bank of America

The second-oldest exhibition of global art, the Carnegie International opened with excitement in October of last year. This sprawling show, which permeates the museum’s exhibition spaces and reaches into its collection galleries, sees its final three months arrive with a variety of activities: visiting artist lectures by Jeremy Deller, Ulrike Müller, and Thaddeus Mosley; a Tam O’Shanter Drawing Session with Beverly Semmes; a Sound Series concert produced by Josiah McElheny, John Corbett, and Jim Dempsey with the Andy Warhol Museum; and drawing sessions with Yuji Agematsu and Tavares Strachan. See the works of Carnegie Prize–winner Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and Fine Prize–winners Postcommodity before the exhibition closes in March.

Social Programs

Ongoing

People engage with art on many levels. The social programming at CMOA aims to bring new faces into the museum and create opportunities for discovery and inspiration. These programs range from the FEAST dinner series—which pairs a local chef with a theme from the Carnegie International for a unique dining experience—to monthly Third Thursday, a themed 18+ event that invites local artists and vendors to create programming relevant to the current exhibitions. An important piece of the museum’s mission of connecting people to art, ideas, and one another, social programs offer an avenue to build engagement and respond to the community.

Summer Camps

June 10–August 16

Following a winter and spring of educational programming, including the exhibition of work by students from The Art Connection, the museum will launch a full calendar of summer camps. Camps offer a unique opportunity to dive deeper into all aspects of art-making, creativity, and collaboration through week-long programs. As part of the museum’s ongoing mission of educating and inspiring, summer camps provide the structure and materials for young people to engage their own creative process. Using the museum’s collection as a resource, campers of all levels and abilities explore through classic and modern art techniques, styles, and practices.


Our Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another.
We believe creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences.

Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Architecture, Technology collide in Copy + Paste

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.216.7909

Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture
October 14, 2017–May 6, 2018
The Heinz Architectural Center Galleries + Hall of Architecture

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture, an eight-month investigation into the museum’s spectacular Hall of Architecture. Visitors to the Hall are constantly wowed by the nearly 150 building facades, monuments, and fragments from across the Western World. What many people don’t realize is that this collection is entirely plaster copies, painstakingly cast and reassembled in 1906–1907. It is the only remaining collection of its type in the US, and one of Pittsburgh’s most iconic spaces.

Over the course of Copy + Paste, curators, technologists, students, architects, and artists will test new ways of presenting information about this special collection. Activities in The Heinz Architectural Center and the Hall range from augmented reality and 3D printing to creative interventions and hands-on activities. The Hall is a mash-up of geography, styles, and periods, so contextualizing and presenting rich content is a priority for Copy + Paste organizer Alyssum Skjeie.

A screen held up to an architectural column displays text information about that object, showing both the column and text on the screen.

Courtesy of Francesca Torello and Josh Bard

Copy + Paste activities and visitor feedback will inform future efforts to create a dynamic, active, and inspiring Hall. These activities include:

  • Plaster Re-Cast – Experience the Hall of Architecture with a new augmented-reality app, by Francesca Torello and Josh Bard from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), School of Architecture. See this impressive cast collection in a new light through interactive historical content and virtual 3D models of the original buildings
  • CMU Architecture Studio – professor of architecture Joshua Bard leads a studio exploring the material culture of architectural plaster, examining its historic importance and possible future robotic applications. Students will work in the exhibition galleries, and their resulting experiments will join the Copy + Paste presentation.
  • CopyShop – a space for creative thinking and making inspired by the Hall of Architecture, the Copy Shop hosts visitor activities designed by invited makerspace expert Jennifer Grayburn in collaboration with the CMOA Education and Exhibition departments.
  • Archival Materials – new digitization efforts make available historic documents on the Hall of Architecture’s original 1907 design, the creation of the casts themselves, and the ideals of creating a grand study collection for people who could not travel. Some of the most intriguing items will be on view in the exhibition, with periodic rotations.

Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture is organized by Alyssum Skjeie, program manager, The Heinz Architectural Center.

HACLab is a project of CMOA’s Heinz Architectural Center. Each Lab invites creative thinkers to design dynamic experiences investigating architecture in Pittsburgh and beyond. The projects are fluid, experimental, and evolve using visitor participation and feedback. We hope that HACLabs offer visitors a new appreciation of human encounters with the built environment.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Action, Ideas, Architecture: Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio

Action, Ideas, Architecture: Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio
March 11–May 22, 2017
The Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art

Arthur Lubetz, 1967-present, Ellsworth Center II, Pittsburgh, PA, 1999-2000,, Photo: Ed Massery, 2010

Arthur Lubetz, 1967-present, Ellsworth Center II, Pittsburgh, PA, 1999-2000, Photo: Ed Massery, 2010

Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces Action, Ideas, Architecture: Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio, opening March 11 at the museum’s Heinz Architectural Center.

High resolution images are available.

The architecture of Arthur Lubetz commands attention with bold colors, distinctive geometries, and unconventional approaches to designing spaces. From the vibrant, tilted façade of The Glass Lofts residences to the sliced and stacked boxes of the Sharpsburg Community Library, these are structures born of provocative ideas about how architecture can energize our built environment.

Though these and other buildings designed by Lubetz and Front Studio range in scale and purpose, they all explore the sensory experience of architecture and its effects on the human body. Frequently, his buildings represent physical forces that can be described in action words, such as cutting, splitting, slicing, and peeling.

Action, Ideas, Architecture surveys the work of Lubetz’s fifty-year-old architectural practice, which merged in 2011 with Front Studio, a New York–based firm that was founded in 2001 by former students of his from Carnegie Mellon University. The exhibition features an architect-designed intervention together with models, drawings, and photography on loan from the Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives, Front Studio, and other lenders.

Based on an initial proposal from CMU Architecture Archives, Action, Ideas, Architecture: Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio is curated by critic and historian Charles L. Rosenblum.

 

Projects explored in Action, Ideas, Architecture include:

Sharpsburg Community Library, Sharpsburg, PA
completed 2015

Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio, 1967- present/2001-present, Sharpsburg Library, Sharpsburg, PA, 2012-14. Photo: Ed Massery, 2015

Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio, 1967-present/2001-present, Sharpsburg Library, Sharpsburg, PA, 2012-14, Photo: Ed Massery, 2015

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh at Squirrel Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
completed 2005

The Glass Lofts, Pittsburgh, PA
completed 2010

Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio, 1967- present/2001-present, Glass Lofts, Pittsburgh, PA, 2007-10, Photo: Ed Massery, 2011

Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio, 1967-present/2001-present, Glass Lofts, Pittsburgh, PA, 2007-10, Photo: Ed Massery, 2011

 

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust.  Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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New examination of design for public space in South America

Building Optimism: Public Space in South America
The Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art
September 10, 2016–February 13, 2017 + summer 2016 micro-show

In recent years, ambitious design for urban life in South America has shown a radical optimism—a belief that planning can strengthen neighborhoods and improve lives.

Spanning projects in Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Paraguay, Peru, and Venezuela, Building Optimism: Public Space in South America investigates ways that emerging architects and designers instigate change through design. And a new collaboration with Ecuadoran architects Al Borde takes a holistic view of Recycle Park in Braddock, PA, exploring the intersection of design, community, play, and public space. Although many of these countries continue to face very real economic and political challenges, these projects reflect a belief in the powerful public role of architecture.

Cristobal Palma, "Biblioteca Parque España," 2007, Film still, Courtesy of Cristobal Palma/Produced by Estudio Palma

Cristobal Palma, “Biblioteca Parque España,” 2007, Film still, Courtesy of Cristobal Palma/Produced by Estudio Palma

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Newman-Schmidt Studios; Workmen installing the first aluminum panel, 1951; gelatin silver print; Director’s Discretionary Fund

HAC Lab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern

Experimental exhibition explores the architecture and urbanism of postwar Pittsburgh

HAC Lab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern
September 12, 2015–May 2, 2016
The Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

The city of Pittsburgh encountered and was transformed by modern architecture in an ambitious program of urban revitalization in the 1950s and ’60s. HAC Lab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern untangles Pittsburgh’s complicated relationship with modern architecture and urban planning. This experimental presentation at Carnegie Museum of Art’s Heinz Architectural Center includes abundant archival materials from the period, an active architecture studio, and a salon-style discussion space, unearthing layers of history and a range of perspectives.

Newman-Schmidt Studios; Workmen installing the first aluminum panel, 1951; gelatin silver print; Director’s Discretionary Fund

Newman-Schmidt Studios; Workmen installing the first aluminum panel, 1951; gelatin silver print; Director’s Discretionary Fund

Charette: Tri-State Journal of Architecture & Building, May 1952;  John J. McKee, publisher Alcoa Building, Harrison & Abramovitz, architect; Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives

Charette: Tri-State Journal of Architecture & Building, May 1952; John J. McKee, publisher; Alcoa Building, Harrison & Abramovitz, architect; Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives

Architects-in-residence, the Boston-based studio over,under, highlight successive histories of pioneering architectural achievements, disrupted neighborhoods, utopian aspirations of public officials and business leaders, and Pittsburgh’s role as a model for the modern American city. These intertwined narratives shape the exhibition’s presentation, as does the assignment for its in-gallery architecture studio: the imaginative reuse of Allegheny Center on Pittsburgh’s North Side.

Brady Stewart Studio; The Civic Arena in Pittsburgh, Easter Sunrise Service, 1963; Courtesy of Brady Stewart Studio

Brady Stewart Studio; The Civic Arena in Pittsburgh, Easter Sunrise Service, 1963; Courtesy of Brady Stewart Studio

As a result, HAC Lab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern is iterative, uncovering stories about this idealistic yet turbulent period throughout its seven-month run. In the 1950s and ’60s, Pittsburgh was held up in national conversations as a key example of a progressive American city for its urban revitalization projects. Many never-realized proposals would have radically altered the city’s urban fabric while others were only partially completed, creating problems in subsequent years. Today, many criticize Pittsburgh’s postwar projects for their destruction of neighborhoods and displacement of communities.

Robert Schwartz, architectural rendering (35mm slide), c. 1964; Panther Hollow Project, Harrison & Abramovitz, architect; Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives

Robert Schwartz; Panther Hollow Project, c. 1964; architectural rendering (35mm slide); Architect: Harrison & Abramovitz; Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives

These stories, addressed through photographs, films, drawings, documents, and other ephemera, reveal idealism and architectural ingenuity alongside public discourse and protest.

Make It Pittsburgh! (brochure); The Public Auditorium Authority of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County ca. 1961; Civic Arena; Mitchell & Ritchey, architect; Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives

The Public Auditorium Authority of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County; Make It Pittsburgh! (brochure), c. 1961; Civic Arena; Mitchell & Ritchey, architect; Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives

Edward R. Massery; Civic Arena from Wylie Avenue, 9.27.2011; inkjet print; Purchase: Second Century Acquisition Fund; © Ed Massery

Edward R. Massery; Civic Arena from Wylie Avenue, 9.27.2011; inkjet print; Purchase: Second Century Acquisition Fund; © Ed Massery

The neighborhoods and projects in focus include Gateway Center, the Lower Hill, Allegheny Center, East Liberty, and Oakland. Significant architects include Harrison & Abramovitz, Mitchell & Ritchey, Simonds & Simonds, and Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM). In addition, HAC Lab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern examines unrealized proposals such as those by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Point.

Harold Corsini; Gateway Center Under Construction, c. 1947-1952; Courtesy of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Harold Corsini; Gateway Center Under Construction, c. 1947-1952; Courtesy of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

During fall 2015, architecture students from Carnegie Mellon University will investigate the legacy and potential of the stalled urban revitalization project at Allegheny Center.

Illustration from Allegheny Center: From a Rich Heritage, a New Way of Life… (brochure); Helmut Jacoby, renderer; Allegheny Center; Deeter & Ritchey, architect; Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh, ca. 1962

Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh; Helmut Jacoby, renderer; Illustration from Allegheny Center: From a Rich Heritage, a New Way of Life… (brochure), c. 1962; Allegheny Center; Deeter & Ritchey, architect; Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives

Students will analyze the sociological, political, and economic motivations for urban renewal; the causes for its shortcomings and successes; and assess the cultural and ecological impact of the current situation. They will then design various scenarios for adaptive reuse of the site. This work will take place in the largest of the Center’s galleries, where proposals will remain on view through May 2. In the spring, this gallery will function as a salon, with comfortable furniture for visitors and a lively program of discussions involving residents, architects, theorists, and urban planners, seeking to understand Pittsburgh today in light of its complex history.

Ultimately HAC Lab Pittsburgh hopes to engage and better inform Pittsburghers and visitors alike about this complex and multi-layered city.

William V. Winans Jr.; Group of Men at Base of Civic Arena, 1960-61; Courtesy of Heinz History Center

William V. Winans Jr.; Group of Men at Base of Civic Arena, 1960-61; Courtesy of Heinz History Center

HAC Lab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern is the first in a new series of HAC Lab initiatives overseen by Raymund Ryan, curator of architecture at the Heinz Architectural Center. Each Lab will see a team of design radicals investigate issues of architectural and planning in Pittsburgh and the surrounding region. This experimental format reflects our constantly changing understanding of architecture and urbanism. Museum visitors are encouraged to return again and again to track the evolution of the research and participate in an evolving body of knowledge.

Brady Stewart Studio; Aerial View of Pittsburgh's Skyline, 1954; Courtesy of Brady Stewart Studio

Brady Stewart Studio; Aerial View of Pittsburgh’s Skyline, 1954; Courtesy of Brady Stewart Studio

About over,under
over,under is a Boston-based practice with expertise in architecture, urban design, graphic production and curation. The firm has designed projects in the United States, Latin America, and the Middle East. Previous exhibitions include Rethinking Boston City Hall (2007) and HEROIC (2009) at pinkcomma, Boston; IN FORM: Communicating Boston (2012), and Let’s Talk About Bikes (2012) at the Boston Society of Architects’ gallery BSA Space; and Design Biennial Boston (2008-). The over,under team for HAC Lab Pittsburgh includes Rami el Samahy, Chris Grimley, Kelly Hutzell, Michael Kubo, Ann Lui and Mark Pasnik. El Samahy is a faculty member at the School of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art, founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895, is nationally and internationally recognized for its collection of fine and decorative art from the 19th to 21st centuries. The collection also contains important holdings of Japanese and old master prints. Founded in 1896, the Carnegie International is one of the longest-running surveys of contemporary art worldwide. The Heinz Architectural Center, part of Carnegie Museum of Art, is dedicated to enhancing understanding of the built environment through its exhibitions, collections, and public programs. The Hillman Photography Initiative serves as a living laboratory for exploring the rapidly changing field of photography. For more information about Carnegie Museum of Art, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, call 412.622.3131 or visit our website at www.cmoa.org

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