Media Archive: Fine Art

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Visions of Order and Chaos Programming Includes PSO Collaboration

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art announces events and programming for its upcoming exhibition, Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye. We are thrilled to host a series of in-gallery music events in collaboration with Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. These evening events pair the music and visual art of the Enlightenment, and take place three times over the course of the show.

Visions of Order and Chaos packs CMOA’s Heinz Galleries with over 200 works from its 1750–1850 holdings. Through extensive research and conservation efforts, we’re able to showcase 75% works which have never before exhibited at the museum. The exhibition shares artist’s visions of a world rapidly becoming modern, and shaped by explosive debates.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye
March 3–June 24, 2018
Heinz Galleries, Carnegie Museum of Art

Ary Scheffer, 'Dante and Virgil Encountering the Shades of Francesca da Rimini and Paolo Malatesta in the Underworld,' 1851, oil on canvas, Heinz Family Fund and Anonymous gift

Ary Scheffer, ‘Dante and Virgil Encountering the Shades of Francesca da Rimini and Paolo Malatesta in the Underworld,’ 1851, oil on canvas, Heinz Family Fund and Anonymous gift

Related Programming
For ticketing and more information, please visit our website or call 412.622.3288

 Member Preview
March 3, 10 a.m.–12 p.m.
Our members get an exclusive preview of Visions of Order and Chaos on its opening day!

Third Thursday: Toga
March 15, 8:00 pm–11:00 pm
Two words: TOGA PARTY. Beware the Ides of March! Dust off your curtains, wash those sheets, and get wrapped up for an adults-only (18+) party for the ages!

Enjoy activities throughout the evening, including:

  • Et tu, Thursday? Get a tour of Visions of Order and Chaos, our exhibition exploring the Age of Enlightenment (it’s full of togas and treachery!)
  • Floral and laurel crown making with WorkshopPGH to match your toga
  • UPMC Health Plan lounge with giveaways and some surprise healthy treats
  • Disco dance party with DJ Jarrett Tebbets
  • Plinth posing selfie station — work your inner statue
  • Performances by WVU’s West African Drum Ensemble, part of the National Council of Ceramic Arts (NCECA) annual convention
  • Demonstrations of ceramic making from NCECA

 

In-gallery Music with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
March 22, April 12, and May 10
5:30 pm–8:00 pm
Don’t miss CMOA and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra bringing you the sights and sounds of the Enlightenment era! Visit our new exhibition, Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye for a special in-gallery music series on three different evenings. Just drop in for informal, intriguing conversations on art and music, free with admission. PSO musicians will perform music from the 18th and 19th centuries among period works of art. We’ll explore a different theme each month.

March 22
A cello quartet will play a Classical piece followed by a modern/pop piece that was influenced by the Classical composer.

April 12
PSO musicians play a selection of Beethoven in response to one of the exhibition’s central questions: “Can Empires Survive?”

May 10
Soprano Katy Williams will sing a selection of the Polish works by Chopin.
Anne Williams, principal cellist, will play a few short pieces by Robert Schumann.

While you’re here, stop by the bar for an opportunity to exchange ideas with curator Lulu Lippincott and researcher Costas Karakatsanis.

 

For more information and images, please contact Jonathan Gaugler.

 

Support
Generous support for this exhibition is provided by The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, the Richard C. von Hess Foundation, the Gailliot Family Foundation, and Ritchie Battle. Additional support is provided by the Mary Louise and Henry J. Gailliot Fund for Exhibitions, the Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund, Martha Malinzak, and The European Fine Art Foundation.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
CMOA creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. We believe that creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world in order to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art announces its first major exhibition of its 1750–1850 holdings, Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye. The exhibition packs CMOA’s Heinz Galleries with over 200 popular and never-before-seen works. It shares artist’s visions of a world rapidly becoming modern, and shaped by explosive debates: Does religion have a role in public life? Should we redistribute wealth to the poor? Can women fully participate in democracy? Can public education produce good citizens? All remain hot-button issues today.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye
March 3–June 24, 2018
Heinz Galleries

Ary Scheffer, 'Faust in His Study,' c. 1831, watercolor and gouache on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Fishkoff

Ary Scheffer, ‘Faust in His Study,’ c. 1831, watercolor and gouache on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Fishkoff

Between 1750–1850, the world changed dramatically. Revolutions toppled monarchies, and constitutional democracy took root in the US and France. This was a time of accelerating ideas on liberty and equality challenging social norms. People began to behave in ways we’d recognize today. Portraits depict their subjects in classical costume, just as we would carefully style an Instagram profile or digital avatar. Gorgeous painted fans could send quick messages, signaling romance from across the room. Celebrities behaved badly and artists captured every single episode.

The Enlightenment was a time of reason and order. Scientific breakthroughs and new ways of governing stimulated optimism for making the world better. A portrait by George Romney, ca. 1779–1780, shows an idealized image of his subject in classical garments and pose. An Edward Hicks painting from 1837 depicts a peaceful gathering of European colonists and Native Americans, alongside a menagerie of coexisting animals, a utopian vision of a young United States. Subjects like global trade, scientists at work, and a new recognition of non-Western cultures crept into art.

Edward Hicks, 'The Peaceable Kingdom,' c. 1837, oil on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Bequest of Charles J. Rosenbloom

Edward Hicks, ‘The Peaceable Kingdom,’ c. 1837, oil on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Bequest of Charles J. Rosenbloom

The Romantics challenged notions of rational, orderly societies. Watching as the noble ideals of the French Revolution ended in violent chaos, the Romantics championed emotions and individuals. Miniature portraits of lovers were worn inside of clothes and out of sight. Ary Scheffer’s 1851 masterwork depicts the swirling shades of entwined lovers Francesca and Rimini from Dante’s Inferno. In Caspar David Friedrich’s 1803 print, a forlorn woman contemplates suicide.

Research and restoration projects have yielded several never-before-shown works. Combined with new acquisitions and longtime gallery favorites, the exhibition tells a story of this sensational century. Quotes from writers of the time contextualize the art on view.

Through painting, sculpture, furniture, prints, drawings, and personal objects, The Enlightened Eye shows a Western world in tension between rational order and chaotic abandon. This was one of the most fascinating times in our history, and CMOA invites you to view our world through their eyes.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye is organized by Louise Lippincott, curator of fine art, with additional support from Rachel Delphia and Margaret Powell, department of decorative arts and design.

Support
Generous support for this exhibition is provided by The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, the Richard C. von Hess Foundation, the Gailliot Family Foundation, and Ritchie Battle. Additional support is provided by the Mary Louise and Henry J. Gailliot Fund for Exhibitions, the Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund, Martha Malinzak, and The European Fine Art Foundation.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
CMOA creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. We believe that creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world in order to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Iconic series by master Japanese Print Maker coming to CMOA

First-edition prints of Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road will be on view for the first time in 25 years

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road
March 31–July 8, 2018
Gallery One

Pittsburgh…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces a new exhibition of one of the most celebrated works of Japanese art, the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido by master printmaker Utagawa (Andō) Hiroshige. The series depicts the spectacular landscapes and interesting characters encountered along the journey from Edo (now Tokyo) to the imperial capital Kyoto. Central to the exhibition are CMOA’s prints from the first Hōeidō edition; 55 in total, created between 1831 and 1834. This will be the first time in 25 years that the entire series has been on view at the museum.

The Tokaido road was the most heavily-traveled route between these two important cities, figuring heavily into popular Japanese art and culture in the mid-1800s. Hiroshige made hundreds of images on the subject throughout his career.

Visitors can follow the progress of the journey along the gallery walls, moving from location to location. In a unique twist, visitors will see examples from Hiroshige’s other series on Tokaido—Reisho, Gyosho, Kichizo, and Aritaya editions—to illustrate the artist’s varied approach to the same subject and innovations of vantage point, perspective, and scale. The exhibition will also feature multiple impressions of the same Hōeidō print to demonstrate variations in the color woodblock printing process, stressing the uniqueness of each singular impression. Different representations of the same station will branch out from the main “path” of the Hōeidō set.

Two different impressions of the same print

Hiroshige Andō, 'Mishima,' c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, ‘Mishima,’ c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, 'Mishima,' c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, ‘Mishima,’ c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

“We’re very fortunate to have an amazing collection of Japanese prints at CMOA” said curator Akemi May. “Having Hiroshige in such depth allows us to nerd-out a little and talk about what makes a good print versus a great print. Their sensitivity to light makes them difficult to display year-round, so this will be quite a treat our visitors will surely love.”

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road is organized by Akemi May, Assistant Curator of Fine Art at CMOA.

Support
Major support for this exhibition is provided by the E. Rhodes & Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Bernard S. and Barbara F. Mars Art Exhibition Endowment.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Edward Hopper; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926; watercolor over charcoal on paper; Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal; Carnegie Museum of Art

CMOA exhibition showcases its entire Hopper collection

CMOA Collects Edward Hopper
July 25–October 26, 2015
Gallery One

Edward Hopper; Sailing, 1911; oil on canvas; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal in honor of the Sarah Scaife Gallery; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

Edward Hopper; Sailing, 1911; oil on canvas; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal in honor of the Sarah Scaife Gallery; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

In 1913, Edward Hopper sold his first painting at the first Armory Show. But it would be over a decade before the now-famed painter sold another. Instead, Hopper turned to etchings, drawings, and watercolors, finding recognition for his masterful compositions of quiet, meditative moments.

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Vincent van Gogh; Still Life, Basket of Apples, 1887; oil on canvas; 18 3/8 x 21 3/4 in. (46.7 x 55.3 cm); Saint Louis Art Museum, Gift of Sydney M. Shoenberg Sr. 43:1972

Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples

March 14–July 6, 2015
Gallery One
Carnegie Museum of Art

“Certainly color is making progress, precisely by the Impressionists, even when they go astray.”
–Vincent van Gogh, May 1889

In the spring of 1886, Vincent van Gogh visited Paris for an extended stay, leaving the city in early 1888. This trip was the catalyst for most of his famous, dynamically colorful works. During his time in Paris, Van Gogh encountered the bold color and brushwork of the Impressionists and a new wave of artists succeeding them, and they inspired him to paint with a new vibrancy and freshness. Most of his famous, dynamically colorful works came after his Paris visit. Experience this story in four paintings with Visiting Van Gogh, which centers on Still Life, Basket of Apples (1887), lent to Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) by the Saint Louis Art Museum. Van Gogh often called his still life paintings “color studies,” and this still life, made toward the end of his stay in Paris, can be seen an experiment with his palette.

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