Media Archive: Contemporary Art

Press Room Banner Oiticica

Programming & Events for “Hélio Oiticica”

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces events and programming forHélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium, the most complete US presentation to date of this important Brazilian artist. Programming is far-ranging, with offerings for art lovers, gourmands, and curious passers-by alike. They include a film screening with director César Oiticica Filho, the return of our culturally immersive FEAST featuring São Paulo chef Ana Luiza Trajano, an evening of music and conversation with MCG Jazz, classes, tours, talks, and late-night Third Thursday activities.

Oiticica revolutionized the idea of interactive art. His work moves from vibrant geometric paintings to total environments suffused with color, texture, and tactile materials. Co-organized by CMOA, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, Hélio Oiticica is the first exhibition in more than two decades to show the full reach of Oiticica’s career.

The exhibition premieres October 1, 2016, at CMOA.

A selection of high-resolution images is available. Please contact Jonathan Gaugler for access.

Preview the exhibition
Get a first look at this major touring exhibition with co-curator, and CMOA director, Lynn Zelevansky.
Friday, September 30, 2016, 9:30 a.m.
Please contact Jonathan Gaugler to RSVP: gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690

EVENTS AND PROGRAMMING

Register for events at http://cmoa.org/calendar, or call 412.622.3288

Hélio Oiticica, "Filter Project—For Vergara (Projeto Filtro—Para Vergara)," 1972, nylon, acrylic, plastic curtains, natural fiber doormat, television set, tape recorders, transistor radio, buzzer, orange juice machine, fluorescent lamps, and fiberboard, (c) Projeto Hélio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro. Courtesy Projeto Hélio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro and Galerie Lelong, New York

Hélio Oiticica, “Filter Project—For Vergara (Projeto Filtro—Para Vergara),” 1972, nylon, acrylic, plastic curtains, natural fiber doormat, television set, tape recorders, transistor radio, buzzer, orange juice machine, fluorescent lamps, and fiberboard, (c) Projeto Hélio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro. Courtesy Projeto Hélio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro and Galerie Lelong, New York

Film Screening and Conversation: Hélio Oiticica
Saturday, October 1, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
Lynn Zelevansky with César Oiticica Filho
CMOA Theater; Free, but seating is limited
Portuguese with English subtitles; 94 min.

“…I discovered around fifteen rolls of Super 8 film. I was impressed that they were still unknown, as he was one of the greatest artists of the second half of the twentieth century. At that moment I had the sensation that, together with the cassette tapes…one would be able to see through the eyes of the artist and hear his inner thoughts.” –César Oiticica Filho

This striking documentary, crafted from rare found-footage, creates an experience analogous to Oiticica’s sensual, dynamic art practice. Exhibition curator and CMOA director Lynn Zelevansky joins film director César Oiticica Filho, the artist’s nephew, in conversation about the art and ideas of this compelling artist, as seen through his own words and images.

Third Thursday: EDEN
Thursday, October 20, 8–11 p.m.
$10 ($8 members, $5 students)

Celebrate Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium after hours, with activities inspired by the artist’s practice.

Samba in Braddock
Saturday, October 29, 1–4 p.m.
Braddock Carnegie Library; Free

The Pittsburgh Samba Group and Timbeleza bring the lively dance and sounds of Brazil to Braddock for a family-friendly multisensory experience! Try outParangolés—Oiticica’s colorful fabric capes, works of art that can be carried or worn—and get inspired for art-making, dancing, and fun!

FEAST: Oiticica
With Brazilian chef Ana Luiz Trajano
November 4, 2016
6 p.m., $200, $175 members

FEAST celebrates art through culinary adventures. Each FEAST takes its cues from art on view at the museum for a completely unique, one-night-only immersive cultural experience. FEAST: Oiticica welcomes chef Ana Luiza Trajano of São Paulo’s acclaimed Brasil a Gosto, which “unloads an avalanche of flavors and textures and experiences without intimidating” (The New York Times).

Chef Trajano champions traditional cooking with recipes gathered from throughout Brazil during her extensive travel researching indigenous ingredients and methods. Both Oiticica and Trajano share a penchant for “cultural cannibalism”—consuming global influences and reinventing them in a distinctly Brazilian setting.

Through Adversity We Live
An Evening of Brazilian Music and Conversation with MCG Jazz & Special Guests
Friday, November 11, 7:30–9 p.m.
Carnegie Music Hall
$35 ($30 members, $25 students)

CMOA and MCG Jazz bring together Brazilian musicians and composers for an evening shifting between the electrifying music and the fascinating stories tying together the art, music, and politics of Hélio Oiticica’s Brazil. Bassist Nilson Matta, guitarist/vocalist Chico Pinheiro, composer Flavio Chamis, percussionist Lucas Ashby, professor Jay Ashby, and MCG Jazz executive producer Marty Ashby join Hélio Oiticica curator Lynn Zelevansky and associate curator Katherine Brodbeck.

Brazilian culture was radically transformed by exchanges between Rio’s vibrant street life and Oiticica’s art practice. Oiticica was no stranger to stirring political controversy, especially after a military dictatorship took power in Brazil. His large, colorful installation Tropicália coined the name of a popular music movement, evoking the colors and sounds of Brazil while subtly protesting political repression. When musicians Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil hung Oiticica’s provocative banner reading “Be an Outlaw, Be a Hero” at a 1968 performance, they were arrested, and later deported. Taking its name from a poetic message hidden in one of Oiticica’s artworks, Through Adversity We Live is a can’t miss musical journey through this turbulent time.

Art History
Art/Culture/Politics: Oiticica’s Brazil
Wednesdays, November 9 + 16, or Saturdays, November 12 + 19, 10:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.
$50 ($40 members, $30 students)

Exhibition co-curator Katherine Brodbeck and University of Pittsburgh PhD candidate Paulina Pardo team up to explore the politically charged and artistically imaginative climate of Brazil from mid-century through the early ’80s.

Morphology in the Studio: Conversations about the Science of Art
Saturday, December 10, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
CMOA Theater, CMOA and CMNH galleries; Free

“I believe that the taxonomic system Oiticica learned at the Museu Nacional provided the conceptual basis for the biological, organic, framework of his oeuvre and for what the artist would later term his program-in-progress.”
–Irene Small, Contemporary Art and Criticism, Princeton University, and author of Morphology in the Studio: Hélio Oiticica at the Museu Nacional

The natural world has long been an inspiration to artists, from direct visual representations to ideologies of taxonomy. For Oiticica, his interest began at home, working for his famous entomologist father José Oiticica Filho at the Museu Nacional, and would inform his lifelong art practice.

Join professor Irene Small and CMNH scientists John Rawlins, Jose Padial, and Steve Tonsor for a lively discussion on the relationships among the natural sciences and contemporary art. Then venture out into the galleries and behind the scenes for one-on-one conversations with the presenters, exhibition curator Lynn Zelevansky and associate curator Katherine Brodbeck, and other artists and scientists for whom this cross-disciplinary approach is their way of navigating the world.

Gallery Ambassadors and Let’s Chat Docents
Gallery Ambassadors will be present all open hours at several locations throughout the exhibition to help visitors engage with the artwork—interactions that are crucial to Oiticica’s art practice.

Hélio Oiticica in front of a poster for the play Prisoner of Second Avenue, in Midtown Manhattan, 1972. © César and Claudio Oiticica

Hélio Oiticica in front of a poster for the play Prisoner of Second Avenue, in Midtown Manhattan, 1972. © César and Claudio Oiticica

About the Exhibition

Visitors to Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium at CMOA can expect to walk across sand and pebbles, traverse bold, colorful structures, and say hello to a friendly Amazon parrot. That’s part of the experience of Tropicália (1966–67), a massive, multisensory installation at the heart of the exhibition. If Tropicália is a kind of journey into the artist’s immersive work, then Eden (1969) is the destination. This huge installation includes spaces and structures for relaxation, reading, conversation, and music. Its surfaces provide tactile experiences for bare feet: strewn with sand or leaves, a pool of water. Occupying the majestic Hall of Sculpture at CMOA, it is rarely staged due to its size and complexity. Ambitious in scale, Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium presents a stunning array of paintings, interactive sculptures, audiovisual works, and environments across the museum’s expansive Heinz Galleries and Hall of Sculpture.

One of the most significant artists of the 20th century, Oiticica (1937–1980) first painted compositions made of geometric shapes that seemed to dance off the painted surface. He soon moved into creating immersive, experiential works, exploding color into three dimensions. His art intertwined with rock music, popular culture, politics, and communities. Throughout the 1960s and ’70s, Oiticica moved further and further toward art that is intended for the viewer to manipulate, wear, and inhabit, including Parangolés, works to be carried or worn, or Penetrables, colorful structures inspired by makeshift dwellings in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro. While living in New York, Oiticica extended his work into filmmaking, slide show environments, and concrete poetry.

A richly illustrated catalogue accompanies the exhibition.
Preview access is available; please contact Jonathan Gaugler: gauglerj@cmoa.org

Helio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium
Lynn Zelevansky, Elisabeth Sussman, James Rondeau, and Donna De Salvo
with Anna Katherine Brodbeck

With contributions by Martha Scott Burton, Fred Coelho, Max Jorge Hinderer Cruz, Sérgio B. Martins, Adele Nelson, Irene V. Small, and Guilherme Wisnik

320 pages with 310 color illustrations
8 3/4 x 11 in. / 22.2 x 27.9 cm
Hardcover: ISBN 978-3-7913-6659-3
Softcover: ISBN 978-3-7913-6660-9
DelMonico Books · Prestel

Hélio Oiticica is organized by Lynn Zelevansky, Henry J. Heinz II Director, Carnegie Museum of Art; Elisabeth Sussman, Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art; James Rondeau, President and Eloise W. Martin Director, The Art Institute of Chicago; and Donna De Salvo, Deputy Director for International Initiatives and Senior Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art; with Anna Katherine Brodbeck, associate curator, Carnegie Museum of Art.

Tour Schedule
Carnegie Museum of Art, October 1, 2016–January 2, 2017
The Art Institute, Chicago, February 19–May 7, 2017
Whitney Museum of American Art, July 14–October 1, 2017

Support
Support for Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium is generously provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Carnegie Museum of Art Fellows, the James H. and Idamae B. Rich Exhibition Endowment Fund, Nancy and Woody Ostrow, the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation, the Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund, the National Endowment for the Arts, Jana and Bernardo Hees, Anonymous, and Simone and Greg Lignelli.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

# # #
Press room banner general

Carnegie International Creative Team Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 7, 2016

CONTACT: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces the Creative Team and curatorial Companions for the Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed., 2018.

Led by Ingrid Schaffner, the curatorial team for the Carnegie International has developed a unique collaborative structure to guide and shape the period leading up to the exhibition opening. A Creative Team, Companions, Travelogues, and Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions comprise this collaboration.

cardsbanner

A Creative Team with Karen Kelly and Barbara Schroeder (of Dancing Foxes) and Prem Krishnamurthy (of Project Projects) will help Schaffner, associate curator Liz Park, and curatorial assistant Allison Miller form editorial and design through-lines for the International’s identity and publications.

Five Companions will enrich Schaffner’s multi-year travel and world-wide research: Magalí Arriola (independent curator, Mexico City), Doryun Chong (Chief Curator, M+, Hong Kong), Ruba Katrib (Curator, SculptureCenter, New York), Carin Kuoni (Director, Vera List Center for Art and Politics, The New School, New York), and Bisi Silva (Founder and Artistic Director, The Centre for Contemporary Art, Lagos). Each Companion joins Schaffner for travel to a destination with which they are not familiar.

A series of Travelogues, commissioned as third-person accounts, takes each of the five journeys as a point of departure. The first, by writer and critic Emmanuel Iduma, will be published on the CMOA website shortly after Schaffner and Kuoni’s trip to West Africa this summer.

In Pittsburgh, the Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions have already begun. These improvisational drawing classes—conducted by participants in all aspects of the International—form a programmatic thread, leading up to and through the exhibition. The series title riffs on the original name of CMOA’s legendary art classes for children. The classes are open to the public. Check http://cmoa.org/calendar for upcoming sessions.

Founded in 1896, the Carnegie International is one of the oldest and most prestigious surveys of contemporary art in the world. The 57th edition opens in the fall of 2018.

Schaffner characterizes the organization of this major exhibition as an ambitious, open-ended research grant. “Research starts with not knowing. The International expands the field of contemporary art wider than I have ever experienced it before. Embarking on this venture as research makes structures and teams all the more essential to help guide and open up the process.”

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

# # #

 

Alison Knowles, "Animals," Collection of wind-up toys, Courtesy the artist and James Fuentes Gallery, New York

Alison Knowles at CMOA

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Participatory and interactive works by artist and poet Alison Knowles come to CMOA

Alison Knowles
May 20–October 24, 2016
Forum Gallery

High resolution images are available. Please contact Jonathan Gaugler for access.

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) presents Alison Knowles, the first museum exhibition to consider the full breadth of the artist’s work across media. The exhibition, which is the 77th installment of the museum’s Forum series, features a focused selection of key pieces from the 1960s to the present, including interactive sculptures; sound-making objects; large works on paper, silk, and canvas; and a selection of the artist’s own collected ephemera.

Alison Knowles, "The Boat Book," 2014–2015, Wood and metal frame with silkscreen, digital print on silk, collage, assemblage, personal ephemera, beans, books, fishing net, photographs, ship anchor, fabric tunnel, electrical lights, audio recording, etc., Courtesy the artist and James Fuentes Gallery, New York

Alison Knowles, “The Boat Book,” 2014–2015, Wood and metal frame with silkscreen, digital print on silk, collage, assemblage, personal ephemera, beans, books, fishing net, photographs, ship anchor, fabric tunnel, electrical lights, audio recording, etc., Courtesy the artist and James Fuentes Gallery, New York

Visitors to CMOA’s Forum Gallery can share in the artist’s experience through touchable, interactive works such as Bean Garden (1971/2016), a tactile encounter that creates a soundtrack for the gallery, as the rustling of dry beans underfoot are amplified throughout the space using microphones. The Boat Book (2014–2015), a large sculptural work consisting of eight-foot-tall moveable pages organized on a central spine, offers an immersive reading experience—an ode to the artist’s older brother who worked on fishing vessels in the Atlantic. A cabinet filled with found objects from Knowles’s own studio—a kind of “retrospective in a box”—also joins the installation. Facilitators in the gallery bring visitors closer to the show through engaging demonstration and conversation.

“Alison Knowles is best known for her performative works of the 1960s, in which she and other artists of her generation associated with the avant-garde group Fluxus expanded the boundaries of art, music, and poetry,” says exhibition curator Eric Crosby, The Richard Armstrong Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at CMOA. “With this show, we are casting equal light on her innovative printed work, collages, sounded objects, and sculptures. I hope the installation will draw museum visitors into Alison’s inquisitive way of looking at the world.”

Allison Knowles photographed at home - New York, NY - August 26, 2014, Photographed by Jason Bergman for Lucky Peach

Allison Knowles photographed at home – New York, NY – August 26, 2014, Photographed by Jason Bergman for Lucky Peach

Since the 1960s, Knowles has performed her “event scores” around the world, inviting audiences to take part in their fruition. During the exhibition’s May 19 opening event, the artist invites participation in her iconic Celebration Red (1962), in which hundreds of Pittsburghers will contribute to a temporary installation of found red objects in the Hall of Sculpture. Visitors may encounter performances of additional scores in the gallery space and beyond.

Opening Event: Celebration Red
May 19, 6:30–8 p.m.
Hall of Sculpture
Join Alison Knowles as she conducts one of her favorite event scores, Celebration Red. For free admission to the museum, bring a red object to leave in our temporary participatory installation in the Hall of Sculpture. Be among the first to enjoy Alison Knowles in the Forum Gallery.

Third Thursday: CELEBRATE
May 19, 8–11 p.m.
CMOA & Sculpture Court
$10 / $8 members / $5 students / $5 Celebration Red participants

Every Third Thursday, we keep the galleries open late and turn up the volume! In the Sculpture Court, catch live performances by Meeting of Important People and The Garment District. We’ll keep Alison Knowles’s event score Celebration Red active throughout the night—bring a red object to contribute to the growing collaborative installation. All CMOA galleries remain open until 11 p.m., including the just-opened Alison Knowles in the Forum Gallery.

Alison Knowles, installation view of "Celebration Red", Image courtesy the artist and Artist Organized Art, New York

Alison Knowles, installation view of “Celebration Red”, Image courtesy the artist and Artist Organized Art, New York

About the Artist
Born in New York City in 1933, Alison Knowles is a visual artist and poet admired for her sound works, prints, installations, performances, and publications. In the 1960s, she was a founding member of Fluxus, an international avant-garde group known for its performance events and widely distributed multiples. Notably, she compiled the book Notations (1969) with John Cage, an influential anthology of experimental music compositions, and she silkscreened Marcel Duchamp’s Coeur Volants (1968), his final printed work.

Over the course of her career, Knowles has consistently engaged the notion of the book, expanding our understanding of the form with small published objects such as Bean Rolls (1963), editions to be worn and performed such as Loose Pages (1983), and large-scale immersive volumes such as The Boat Book (2014–2015). Her much discussed event scores Make a Salad (1962) and The Identical Lunch (1969) have been performed at Tate Modern in London, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and many other venues worldwide. In addition to her many teaching engagements, Knowles has been honored with a Guggenheim Fellowship (1968), grants from the National Endowment for the Arts (1981 and 1985), a Lifetime Achievement Award from the College Art Association (2003), and honorary doctorates from Columbia College (2009) and Pratt Institute (2015).

Support
Support for the Forum series is generously provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

# # #
press room banner ai weiwei

Ai Weiwei’s Iconic Zodiac Heads at CMOA

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…It takes a substantial work of art to stand out in the majestic Hall of Architecture at Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA). This summer, internationally recognized Chinese artist Ai Weiwei—currently making headlines for his work in Greece to highlight the plight of Syrian Refugees—contributes a fascinating new dimension to the space with his iconic Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads. This artwork is made up of 12 figures of the traditional Chinese zodiac, cast in bronze. Each stands over 10 feet tall and weighs around 2,000 pounds.

Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads
May 28–August 29, 2016
Hall of Architecture

Ai Weiwei at the foundry in Chengdu, China, Courtesy of the artist

Ai Weiwei at the foundry in Chengdu, China, Courtesy of the artist

“Visitors won’t want to miss this,” said CMOA’s chief curator Catherine Evans. “We’re infusing one of the most inspiring spaces in any museum with a monumental work by one of the world’s most dynamic contemporary dissident artists.”

The Hall of Architecture houses one of the world’s few remaining plaster cast collections, filled with reproductions of colossal building facades and fragments from ancient times to the Renaissance. It represents Andrew Carnegie’s vision at the turn of the 19th century of bringing reconstructed icons of the Western world to Pittsburgh. Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads likewise deals with architectural fragments, reimagining the figures that once adorned the famed fountain-clock of Yuanming Yuan, an imperial retreat in Beijing destroyed by the British in 1860. It debuted on the world stage in 2011 shortly after the artist, an outspoken critic of the communist regime, had been detained by Chinese authorities and held for 80 days. It wasn’t until last year that Ai Weiwei was able to travel outside of China.

Ai Weiwei, "Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads," (detail, Rooster) 2010, Bronze, Private Collection, Images courtesy of Ai Weiwei, Photo: Tim Nighswander

Ai Weiwei, “Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads,” (detail, Rooster), 2010, bronze, private Collection, Images courtesy of Ai Weiwei, Photo: Tim Nighswander

Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads pays homage to China’s history while speaking to contemporary concerns. “It’s about the future and the past, and how China is looked at today and how it looks at itself,” explains Ai. “It has many, many different layers—is it art or not art, and to what degree?” It toys with notions of reproduction in order to bring to life the original looted artworks, which continue to incite debate and discussion about looted art whenever a fragment of the original fountain emerges on the international market.

Together, Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads and CMOA’s Hall of Architecture create a one-of-a-kind immersive experience that brings together past and present, and underscores how cultural histories are retold.

This presentation complements the concurrent exhibition Andy Warhol/Ai Weiwei at our sibling institution The Andy Warhol Museum (June 4–August 28).

Andy Warhol / Ai Weiwei, developed by The Warhol and the National Gallery of Victoria, with the participation of Ai Weiwei, explores the significant influence of these two artists on contemporary life. The exhibition focuses on the parallels, intersections, and points of difference between their practices—Warhol representing 20th-century modernity and the “American century,” and Ai representing life in the 21st century and what has been called the “Chinese century” to come. At The Warhol, the exhibition creates a dialogue between the artists throughout the seven floors of the building with more than 350 artworks across media, including some of the major contributions by both artists.

 

Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads Quick Facts

Ai Weiwei (Chinese, b. 1957)
Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads, 2010
bronze
Private collection
Images courtesy of Ai Weiwei

 

12 figures comprise the artwork

Snake                  118” high x 53” wide x 63” deep

Ox                         128” high x 62” wide x 63” deep

Dragon                134” high x 66” wide x 77” deep

Dog                       119” high x 53” wide x 68” deep

Monkey               119” high x 53” wide x 56” deep

Ram                      120” high x 60” wide x 62” deep

Tiger                     129” high x 53” wide x 62” deep

Horse                    119” high x 53” wide x 61” deep

Rat                         119” high x 53” wide x 63” deep

Rabbit                  129” high x 53” wide x 63” deep

Pig                          119” high x 53” wide x 67” deep

Rooster                144” high x 53” wide x 55” deep

Support
Support for Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals / Zodiac Heads installation at Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Architecture is provided by Agnes Gund,

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art

Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

 

# # #

Hélio Oiticica Retrospective at CMOA

CMOA to stage colorful, spectacular, immersive exhibition of Brazilian artist Hélio Oiticica

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium
Carnegie Museum of Art
October 1, 2016–January 2, 2017

High-resolution images are available.

Hélio Oiticica; PN1 Penetrable (PN1 Penetrável), 1960; Oil on wood; César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Hélio Oiticica; “PN1 Penetrable (PN1 Penetrável),” 1960; Oil on wood; César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Pittsburgh, PA…Visitors to the exhibition of Brazilian artist Hélio Oiticica (1937–1980) at Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) can expect to walk across sand and pebbles, traverse bold, colorful structures, and say hello to a friendly Amazon parrot. That’s part of the experience of Tropicália (1966–67), a massive, multisensory installation at the heart of Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium.

If Tropicália is a kind of journey into the artist’s immersive work, then Eden (1969) is the destination. This huge installation includes spaces and structures for relaxation, reading, conversation, and music. Its surfaces provide tactile experiences for bare feet: strewn with sand or leaves, a pool of water. Occupying the majestic Hall of Sculpture at CMOA, it is rarely staged due to its size and complexity. The exhibition is the most complete retrospective of the artist to date, and the first to explore in depth his New York years (1971–78). Ambitious in scale, it presents a stunning array of paintings, interactive sculptures, audiovisual works, and environments across the museum’s expansive Heinz Galleries and Hall of Sculpture.

Hélio Oiticica in front of a poster for the play Prisoner of Second Avenue, in Midtown Manhattan, 1972; Facsimile of photograph; César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro, AHO/PHO 1931.72

Hélio Oiticica in front of a poster for the play Prisoner of Second Avenue, in Midtown Manhattan, 1972; Facsimile of photograph; César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

One of the most influential artists of the 20th century, Oiticica first painted compositions made of geometric shapes that seemed to dance off the painted surface. He soon moved into creating immersive, experiential works, exploding color into three dimensions. For the artist, these works were completed only when viewers interacted with them. Throughout the 1960s and ’70s, Oiticica moved further and further toward art that is intended for the viewer to manipulate, wear, and inhabit, including Parangolés, works to be carried or worn that often contain poetic or political messages only visible when the wearer is in motion, or Penetrables, colorful structures inspired by makeshift dwellings in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro. While living in New York, Oiticica extended his work into filmmaking, slide show environments, and concrete poetry. Shortly before his return to Rio he again began inventing structures for human interaction.

Nildo of Mangueira wearing P15 Parangolé Cape 11, I Embody Revolt (P15 Parangolé capa 12, Eu incorporo a revolta, 1967), ca. 1968; Facsimile of photograph; César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro, AHO/PHO 1995.sd–p3

Nildo of Mangueira wearing “P15 Parangolé Cape 11, I Embody Revolt (P15 Parangolé capa 12, Eu incorporo a revolta, 1967),” ca. 1968; Facsimile of photograph; César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium brings visually arresting, wholly original artwork to Pittsburgh for an experience unlike any other. After its CMOA presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Art Institute of Chicago and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

Hélio Oiticica is organized by Lynn Zelevansky, Henry J. Heinz II Director, Carnegie Museum of Art; Elisabeth Sussman, Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art; James Rondeau, Dittmer Chair and Curator, Department Modern and Contemporary Art, The Art Institute of Chicago; and Donna De Salvo, Deputy Director for International Initiatives and Senior Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art; with Anna Katherine Brodbeck, Associate Curator, Carnegie Museum of Art.

Support

Support for Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium is generously provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Carnegie Musuem of Art Fellows, the James H and Idamae B. Rich Exhibition Endowment Fund, Nancy and Woody Ostrow, and the Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art

Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

 

# # #