Media Archive: Announcements

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Exhibitions and Programming for January–June

Contact
Emily Willson
Carnegie Museum of Art
willsone@cmoa.org
412.622.3328

Pittsburgh, PA (January 9, 2019) Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces four new exhibitions, dynamic social programming, and engaging educational opportunities for 2019. The exhibitions represent a wide range of artistic styles and periods, from decorative arts and design and contemporary art to classic Impressionism favorites.

“I’m proud of the variety this year,” says Henry H.J. Heinz II Acting Co-Director Catherine Evans. “They show the dynamic and varied experiences you can have at a museum—from seeing Ruth Root’s fabulous patterns to studying the serial painting techniques of Monet to learning about the latest breakthroughs in accessibility design. Museums should be a place for discovery and inspiration, and I think 2019 embodies that spirit.”

New Exhibitions

Ruth Root

April 19–August 25
Forum Gallery

The 81st installment of CMOA’s Forum series will debut a new body of work by acclaimed New York–based painter Ruth Root. For the last two decades, Root has fashioned unruly paintings that push the boundaries of the medium and delight in the pleasures of pattern and shape. For this new series, curator Eric Crosby invited Root to mine CMOA’s collection of artworks and design objects as inspiration for her digitally printed fabrics, which suspend irregular sheets of painted plastic. Through a visual dialogue with the museum’s collection, her eye-popping works personify the wonder of painting.

Ruth Root, digital fabric design for Untitled, 2017; Image courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Ruth Root, digital fabric design for Untitled, 2017; Image courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Influencers: The Pritzker Architecture Prize

May 4–September 2
Heinz Architectural Center

Since its establishment in 1979, the Pritzker Architecture Prize has become the most esteemed prize in architecture worldwide; awarded to individual architects for their total body of work, the Pritzker is frequently referred to as the Nobel Prize for Architecture. To mark the prize’s 40th anniversary, Raymund Ryan, curator, Heinz Architectural Center, presents work from the museum’s collection done by Pritzker laureates. Bolstered by several recent acquisitions, these drawings, models, furniture, and photographs are presented in collaboration with the annual summer camp to stimulate the imaginations of museum visitors and camp participants alike.

Hans Hollein, Stadtstruktur (City Structure), 1959, ink on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. 2018.23.

Hans Hollein, Stadtstruktur (City Structure), 1959, ink on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. 2018.23.

Monet and the Modern City

May 25–September 2
Gallery One

Monet and his contemporaries responded to the urban industrial landscape through works that convey the power and promise of modernization. Organized by curator Akemi May, this exhibition contextualizes Monet’s famous Waterloo Bridge series with other artists’ work from the time, exploring Monet’s process of serial painting and the enduring theme of industry in art. Carnegie Museum of Art’s own Waterloo Bridge painting is presented alongside two others from the series, thanks to the Worcester Art Museum and the Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, and captures the range of moods and colors that serial painting can produce. Other notable works include pieces by Camille Pissarro, Jean-Emile Laboureur, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler, which provide a broader frame of reference for the urban industrial landscape as subject.

Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, London, 1903, Carnegie Museum of Art. Acquired through the generosity of the Sarah Mellon Scaife Family. 67.2

Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, London, 1903, Carnegie Museum of Art.
Acquired through the generosity of the Sarah Mellon Scaife Family. 67.2

Access+Ability

June 1–October 6, 2019
Heinz Galleries

Access+Ability highlights some of the extraordinary research and designs developed during the past decade with and by people who span a wide range of physical, cognitive, and sensory abilities. Fueled by demand and advances in research and digital technologies, a proliferation of functional, life-enhancing products is creating unprecedented access. Low-tech designs that assist with daily routines, digital technology like eye-tracking devices for communicating and editing, and sensors that stabilize tremors associated with Parkinson’s disease, plus innovations in all-terrain wheelchairs, are augmenting the potential for people to access the world in ways previously unimaginable. These objects—many of which are still in prototype stage—represent the future of accessibility design.

Access+Ability was organized by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. The CMOA presentation of Access+Ability is organized by Rachel Delphia, the Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design.

Earring Aid, Bedazzled, 2014. Designed by Elana Langer. Swarovski crystals, e6000 glue, hearing aid. Gift of Elana Langer. Photo: © Hanna Agar.

Earring Aid, Bedazzled, 2014. Designed by Elana Langer. Swarovski crystals, e6000 glue, hearing aid. Gift of Elana Langer. Photo: © Hanna Agar.

Ongoing and Educational

Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018.

Open through March 25
Presented by Bank of America

The second-oldest exhibition of global art, the Carnegie International opened with excitement in October of last year. This sprawling show, which permeates the museum’s exhibition spaces and reaches into its collection galleries, sees its final three months arrive with a variety of activities: visiting artist lectures by Jeremy Deller, Ulrike Müller, and Thaddeus Mosley; a Tam O’Shanter Drawing Session with Beverly Semmes; a Sound Series concert produced by Josiah McElheny, John Corbett, and Jim Dempsey with the Andy Warhol Museum; and drawing sessions with Yuji Agematsu and Tavares Strachan. See the works of Carnegie Prize–winner Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and Fine Prize–winners Postcommodity before the exhibition closes in March.

Social Programs

Ongoing

People engage with art on many levels. The social programming at CMOA aims to bring new faces into the museum and create opportunities for discovery and inspiration. These programs range from the FEAST dinner series—which pairs a local chef with a theme from the Carnegie International for a unique dining experience—to monthly Third Thursday, a themed 18+ event that invites local artists and vendors to create programming relevant to the current exhibitions. An important piece of the museum’s mission of connecting people to art, ideas, and one another, social programs offer an avenue to build engagement and respond to the community.

Summer Camps

June 10–August 16

Following a winter and spring of educational programming, including the exhibition of work by students from The Art Connection, the museum will launch a full calendar of summer camps. Camps offer a unique opportunity to dive deeper into all aspects of art-making, creativity, and collaboration through week-long programs. As part of the museum’s ongoing mission of educating and inspiring, summer camps provide the structure and materials for young people to engage their own creative process. Using the museum’s collection as a resource, campers of all levels and abilities explore through classic and modern art techniques, styles, and practices.


Our Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another.
We believe creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences.

Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

# # #

CMOA Announces Recent Acquisitions

July 11, 2018
Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

CMOA Announces Recent Acquisitions

Carnegie Museum of Art announces recent collection acquisitions. These highlights in contemporary art, decorative arts, and photography join the museum’s collection of over 30,000 works. Three of them, by Joan Brown, Alex Katz, and Pope.L, will debut in Crossroads: Carnegie Museum of Art’s Collection, 1945 to Now, opening July 20.

Joan Brown, 'The Room, Part 1,' 1975, oil enamel on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Purchase, gifts of Paul Chanin, Samuel Kootz, and Dr. and Mrs. Laibe A. Kessler, by exchange. Courtesy of The Estate of Joan Brown

Joan Brown, ‘The Room, Part 1,’ 1975, oil enamel on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Purchase, gifts of Paul Chanin, Samuel Kootz, and Dr. and Mrs. Laibe A. Kessler, by exchange. Courtesy of The Estate of Joan Brown

San Francisco–born painter Joan Brown is best known for her large-scale self-portraits, which combine bright, cartoonish drawing with a Beat sensibility and her own personal lexicon of symbols. The Room, Part 1 is a particularly introspective self-portrait depicting an isolated figure studying a painting of Chinese Kazakhs of the Altai mountain range in western Mongolia. It signals a shift when Brown began to seek spiritual and metaphysical awakening through research into non-Western cultures and religions.

Alex Katz
Vivien Baseball Cap, 2006
Oil on linen
Carnegie Museum of Art, gift of the artist
For image permissions, please contact VAGA

Alex Katz is one of the most celebrated living American painters. His seemingly effortless and often large-scale canvases offer intimate depictions of family and friends as well as seasonal change and the landscape. The subject of this painting is the artist’s daughter-in-law, Vivien. Katz was featured prominently in the 1999 Carnegie International, and is one of the few living artists collected in significant depth by CMOA.

 

Small glass bottle with geometric facets

Consolidated Lamp & Glass Co. (manufacturer),
Reuben Haley (designer), Ruba Rombic toilet bottle, 1928–1932, glass, Carnegie Museum of Art, James L. Winokur Fund and the Elizabeth A. Drain Fund

This perfume bottle was a part of the Ruba Rombic line of glassware manufactured at the Consolidated Lamp and Glass Company in Coraopolis, PA around 1928. Inspired by modern art, including Cubism, the Ruba Rombic line was sold around the country for a limited time. This bottle’s beautiful, iridescent lilac color is rare.

Wall hanging made of silver platters, cut and welded together, with filigree cut out to create a tattered bottom edge

Jaydan Moore, ‘Platter / Rather,’ 2016, found and reconfigured silver-plated platters, Carnegie Museum of Art, Second Century Acquisition Fund

“One man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” or so the saying goes. In this beautiful, ornamental wall plaque, artist Jayden Moore reconfigures dozens of 19th- or 20th-century silver-plated platters. With fussy engraved decoration, the trays represent the modern democratization of silver with more affordable, silver-plated base metal. Banal inscriptions, such “Crestwood Farms / Garden Club / 1975–1977” reveal the longstanding tradition of commemorative plaques and trophies. Despite the legacy of traditions that elevated such objects, all the platters in this work ceased to matter. They were discarded, trashed, and forgotten. Moore picks up the pieces, literally, and refashions them with metal snips, solder, and a jeweler’s saw. His meditative, finished work is more interesting today than any of its component parts.

Image of intricate lace

Lisa Oppenheim, ‘Leisure Work III’ (Top), 2013, gelatin silver print, Purchased with funds provided by The William Talbott Hillman Foundation

For this work, Lisa Oppenheim placed lace directly on top of photographic paper and exposed it to light, creating a direct negative or “photogram.” This process was invented by William Henry Fox Talbot, the originator of photography on paper and an inspiration for Oppenheim. The title is a reference to the classification of female lace makers in early 20th-century Belgium as “leisure workers,” which prevented them from being able to vote.

Pope.L, 'Fountain (reparations version),' 2016-2017, acrylic, oil, oil stick, chalk, and chewing gum on porcelain fountain, Carnegie Museum of Art, A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund, © Pope.L, Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NY

Pope.L, ‘Fountain (reparations version),’ 2016-2017, acrylic, oil, oil stick, chalk, and chewing gum on porcelain fountain, Carnegie Museum of Art, A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund, © Pope.L, Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NY

The multidisciplinary, Chicago-based artist Pope.L has been challenging notions of race, class, and social stereotyping with his work across a variety of mediums since the late 1970s. His work was included in CMOA’s exhibition 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art in 2017. Fountain (reparations version) unites many of the artist’s recurring interests such as artist Marcel Duchamp’s “readymades,” the history of Jim Crow laws in America, and the Flint water crisis in Michigan.

Round bottle with painted scene showing river boats

Unknown British, Flask, ca. 1830, transfer-printed earthenware, Carnegie Museum of Art, Berdan Memorial Trust Fund, Elizabeth A. Drain Fund and the Mary Murtland Wurts Fund

Although this earthenware flask or canteen was manufactured in England, it was designed for export to the United States. The image on both sides, which was transferred to the clay by printing on tissue paper, depicts a busy day along the Monongahela River, just south of downtown Pittsburgh, in the early 19th century.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another.
We believe creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences.

Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

# # #

 

CMOA announces recent acquisitions

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces highlights from its new acquisitions, which were approved on December 14. The museum’s collection includes over 30,000 art objects including painting and sculpture; prints and drawings; photographs; architectural casts, renderings, and models; decorative arts and design; and film, video, and digital imagery.

Several highlights from our December 14 acquisitions include:

Photograph of a shiny steel chair, the steel frame is drawn out and sculpted to the sides like two droopy arms

nendo, ‘Manga chair #49,’ 2016, stainless steel, Edition 2 of 3, Gifts of G. David Thompson, John Baird Hudson and the Hudson Conservancy, and Reverend Alfred Duane Pell, all by exchange, © 2016 nendo, by permission

nendo
Japanese, 2002–present
Manga chair #49, 2016
stainless steel
32 x 45 ¾ x 17 ¼ in.
Edition 2 of 3
Gifts of G. David Thompson, John Baird Hudson and the Hudson Conservancy, and Reverend Alfred Duane Pell, all by exchange
© 2016 nendo, by permission

Grid of small model chairs. Each is distorted or accented in a cartoonish way, showing motion or humorous gestures

nendo, ‘Scale models of 50 Manga chairs,’ 2016, 3-D printed, thermoplastic, Gift of Allan Gerdau, by exchange,© 2016 nendo, by permission

nendo
Japanese, 2002–present
Scale models of 50 Manga chairs, 2016
3-D printed thermoplastic
Dimensions variable, each approx. H: 4 in.
Gift of Allan Gerdau, by exchange
© 2016 nendo, by permission

Manga, or “humorous picture,” is a popular style of Japanese comic book art. The details of characters (eyes, hair, and other body parts) are exaggerated for comedic or dramatic effect. With the group of 50 Manga chairs, design firm nendo mimics the qualities of manga comics. The chairs are happy, distressed, embarrassed, and surprised. CMOA has acquired a full set of 50 1/10 scale models representing each manga chair, along with one full-size chair, Manga chair #49, designed with flopping arms resting humorously at each side.

–Rachel Delphia, The Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design

 

Photograph of a woman wearing a long dress made of white gloves, and a sash, like a beauty pageant contestant

Lorraine O’Grady, ‘Untitled (Mlle Bourgeoise Noire),’ 1980–1983, printed 2009, 14 gelatin silver prints, Second Century Acquisition Fund and the Mr. and Mrs. Peter Denby Fund for Contemporary Art, © Lorraine O’Grady / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Lorraine O’Grady
American, b. 1934
Untitled (Mlle Bourgeoise Noire), 1980–1983, printed 2009
14 gelatin silver prints
15 1/8 x 15 1/8 x 7/8 in. each
Second Century Acquisition Fund and the Mr. and Mrs. Peter Denby Fund for Contemporary Art
© Lorraine O’Grady / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Lorraine O’Grady has been recognized as a significant player both in the fields of conceptual art and feminist art. Untitled (Mlle Bourgeoise Noire) documents her guerrilla performance as the character Mlle Bourgeoise Noire (Miss Black Middle-Class) occupying the space of museum openings where people of color and women have historically been marginalized or excluded. See this work now in 20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art in CMOA’s Heinz Galleries.

–Eric Crosby, The Richard Armstrong Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, and Hannah Turpin, curatorial assistant

Cross-section drawing of a building

Peter Salter, ‘Early Sectional Elevation, Walmer Yard Housing, London,’ 2004, Ink, pencil, and acrylic on architectural paper, Drue Heinz Trust

Peter Salter
British, 1947–
Early Sectional Elevation, Walmer Yard Housing, London, 2004
Ink, pencil, and acrylic on architectural paper
11 3/4 x 16 3/4 in
Drue Heinz Trust

Renowned for his meticulous drawings and atmospheric architecture, Peter Salter recently completed four townhouses on Walmer Road in West London. The Heinz Architectural Center is delighted to add to its collection a set of plans and a cross section of this complex project as well as a characteristically poetic working drawing of the lower street façade.

–Raymund Ryan, curator of architecture

Stark image of a leafless tree standing out against a bright sky

William Henry Fox Talbot, ‘Oak Tree in Winter,’ 1842–1843, Salted paper print from a calotype negative, Gift of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation

William Henry Fox Talbot
British, 1800–1877
Oak Tree in Winter, 1842–1843
Salted paper print from a calotype negative
7 11/16 x 6 9/16 in. image
Gift of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation

Considered to be one of the inventors of photography, William Henry Fox Talbot drew on his knowledge of art history, botany, chemistry, and optics to produce the first ever photographic work on paper. The particular choice of subject for this photograph must have come easily; Talbot once wrote, “Old oak trees are very much to my taste.” See this work now in William Henry Fox Talbot and the Promise of Photography in CMOA’s Gallery One.

–Dan Leers, curator of photography

Two people having a conversation, their faces flattened into geometric planes

Max Weber, ‘The Discussion,’ 1918, Graphite and gouache on paper, The Foster Charitable Trust Fund

Max Weber
American, 1881–1961
The Discussion, 1918
Graphite and gouache on paper
8 9/16 x 5 1/2 in.
The Foster Charitable Trust Fund

This is a work of cubist abstraction, but the title tells us there’s more to it. Its line and form and space and color and texture are complex and beautiful; and so, perhaps, is the relationship between two individuals sharing an aperitif and a conversation. I recommended its acquisition for its strength and freshness of color, and because it exemplifies early cubism. In addition, it is the first cubist work in our collection by this important American modernist, and it comes with a Pittsburgh provenance.

–Louise Lippincott, curator of fine art

 

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

 

Press room banner general

Teenie Harris Archivist successfully endowed

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

 

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is thrilled to announce the successful completion of fundraising efforts toward the Teenie Harris Archivist endowment. This $1.5 million campaign ensures that the museum will continue to research and interpret one of its most important collections, the Teenie Harris Archive.

Dominique Luster, CMOA’s current Teenie Harris Archivist, was hired in 2016. “Charles  ‘Teenie’ Harris had no idea, at the time, that he was building what would become one of the most important archives of the 20th-century African American experience,” said Luster. “It is a great honor to share the stories of the thousands captured in the photographs. And this archive still has countless more stories to tell. I’m grateful and excited to see the support for this position, and eager to continue with this amazing body of work.”

Charles "Teenie" Harris, Self-portrait, c. 1938-1945, black and white: Kodak Safety Film, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Charles “Teenie” Harris, Self-portrait, c. 1938-1945, black and white: Kodak Safety Film, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

In a joint statement, co-interim directors Catherine Evans and Sarah Minnaert said, “Teenie Harris is special, to CMOA and to Pittsburgh. Visitors tell us again and again that the photography in the Teenie Harris Archive is a favorite aspect of CMOA’s collection. The sheer size and scope of the archive, and the personal connections many people hold to these images, make this endowed position absolutely essential. We can’t wait to see the discoveries we’ll make.”

About the Teenie Harris Archive
Charles “Teenie” Harris produced nearly 80,000 images of Pittsburgh’s African American community as a photographer for the influential Pittsburgh Courier and as a freelancer. The photographs, taken from the 1930s to the 1970s, capture a period of momentous change for black Americans, and depict a black urban community that, in spite of the segregationist policies and attitudes of midcentury America, was innovative, thriving, and proud. The museum acquired these negatives in 2001 from the Harris estate, and established the Teenie Harris Archive soon afterward. It is one of the most complete records of a single community.

This fundraising drive was kicked off by a $300,000 challenge grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Leadership support was provided by:
Nancy and Milton+ Washington, the Davenport Family Fund, and Cecile M. and Eric N. Springer.

Generous institutional support was provided by:
The Heinz Endowments, Anonymous, PNC Bank Foundation, EQT Foundation, Cohen & Grigsby, P.C., John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and the Massey Charitable Trust.

Dedicated Individual support provided by:
David and Gabriela Porges, Betsy and Doug Branson, Janet and Bill Hunt, Clyde B. Jones III, Nancy and Woody Ostrow, Brian Wongchaowart, Ellen Still Brooks, Christopher Carson and Maria Kast-Carson, Dawn and Chris Fleischner, Margo M. Flood, Charles A. Harris, Greg J. Hohman, Richard V. Gambrell, and the generous partners, employees, and friends of Cohen & Grigsby, P.C.

+deceased

Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this statement do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces the Opening Date of the 57th Carnegie International

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 20, 2017

Justin Conner
Justin@hellothirdeye.com
917.609.8499

Emily Willson
Carnegie Museum of Art
willsone@cmoa.org
412.622.3328

Carnegie International to Open October 12, 2018

Programming and Artist Site Visits Happening Now

Thaddeus Mosley, Art Labor with Joan Jonas, and Mimi Cherono Ng’ok announced as participating artists

Pittsburgh, PA… Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is pleased to announce that the Carnegie International, 57th edition, 2018, curated by Ingrid Schaffner, will open October 12, 2018, and run through March 25, 2019. However, the International is already under way, with expanding research and creative documentation along with a highly-crafted schedule of programs, commissioned essays, and participating artists coming to Pittsburgh for immersive visits. As part of Schaffner’s interest in making the research process accessible and evolving. New York-based design firm Project Projects has built an online portal for the International.

The Carnegie International online portal serves as a living, accumulating document, where viewers can read Travelogues by writer and critic Emmanuel Iduma and artist Maira Kalman, based on the research trips taken by Schaffner. The Travelogues make visible the spirit of research and travel leading up to the International, inviting writers to add their own voice, interpretation, and experience to the process. Future Travelogues by Pico Iyer, among others, will be added in the coming months, each chronicling Schaffner’s travels with a curator companion to a region he or she had never visited before. The companions were Doryun Chong, Chief Curator at M+, Hong Kong; Ruba Katrib, Curator of SculptureCenter, New York; Carin Kuoni, Director of the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, The New School, New York; Bisi Silva, Founder and Artistic Director of the Centre for Contemporary Art, Lagos; and Magalí Arriola, a Mexico City-based independent curator.

“I was thinking about the Carnegie Museums’ identity as a research institute, and thought that offered a useful model,” said Schaffner. “The colleagues I traveled with are not co-curators but thinking partners. By supporting their work in the field, the International has helped build new networks of artists and curators around the world.”

Back in Pittsburgh, Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions have begun. In a nod to the heritage of founder Andrew Carnegie (a tam-o’-shanter is a traditional Scottish beret), CMOA has held these art classes for young people since 1929. Schaffner has retuned the format to create a programmatic thread leading up to and throughout the exhibition.  The public programs are conducted by artists and organizers of the International, who connect their work and participants through improvisational acts of drawing. Each session is unique. Skill is not required to map, mark, doodle, render, cartoon, write, or otherwise participate in these open-ended gatherings. This program underscores Schaffner’s commitment to unpacking the history of the International as an evolving exhibition concept.

Continue reading