Media Archive: 2018 Exhibitions

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Acclaimed photographer Deana Lawson shows never-before-seen works in new exhibition

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Deana Lawson
March 15–July 15, 2018
Forum Gallery

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) presents Deana Lawson, a new exhibition of never-before-shown photographs by Lawson (b. 1979). The Brooklyn-based artist’s growing body of work addresses critical issues surrounding representations of African Americans and the African diaspora. The exhibition is the 80th edition of CMOA’s dynamic Forum series, uninterrupted since 1990, bringing the work of extraordinary artists to Pittsburgh.

Deana Lawson, 'Nation,' 2017, © 2018 Deana Lawson

Deana Lawson, ‘Nation,’ 2017, inkjet print, © 2018 Deana Lawson

Few photographers working today unpack complexities of race and identity like Deana Lawson. Her strikingly-arranged portraits are packed with details that invite contemplation and close inspection. Lawson depicts people and interiors she encounters in her daily routines and travels, from her own neighborhood in Brooklyn to Soweto, South Africa, and beyond. She also appropriates photographs from other sources to address depictions of African Americans in media and visual culture. The exhibition includes 10 photographs, printed in the largest size ever for the artist. Their life-size scale affords scrutiny of the carpeting, clothing, furniture, hair, and jewelry that impact our perceptions—and perhaps biases—about people and their stories.

Deana Lawson also features photographic installations that burst out of the traditional picture frame and onto the exhibition walls. Lawson taps a variety of sources, including mass media and photo libraries, to explore how images in contemporary visual culture shape perceptions and stereotypes of people and communities.  Each one is site-specific to CMOA and meticulously assembled by the artist in response to the museum and its local context.

We invite everyone to meet Deana Lawson and exhibition curator Dan Leers at the opening reception. The event is on March 15 at 7 p.m., and is free to the public. The museum’s monthly Third Thursday series follows from 8–11 p.m.

CMOA’s Forum series hosts diverse artists working on innovative projects in our Forum Gallery, located in the main lobby of the museum. For over 25 years, the series has offered our curators a dynamic space to show new developments in contemporary art.

Deana Lawson is organized by Dan Leers, curator of photography at Carnegie Museum of Art.

 

Major funding for the Forum series is generously provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation. Additional support for this exhibition is provided by the Marty McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another.
We believe creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences.

Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces the participation of Koyo Kouoh in the Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed., 2018

 CONTACTS:

Justin Conner
Justin@hellothirdeye.com
917.609.8499

Jonathan Gaugler
gauglerj@cmoa.org
412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Overseen by curator Ingrid Schaffner, the Carnegie International is happening now! This month, Koyo Kouoh will present a Special Topics seminar at the University of Pittsburgh to develop “Dig Where You Stand,” an exhibition-within-an-exhibition for the International.


Koyo

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) and the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) welcome Koyo Kouoh to Pittsburgh. Kouoh is the founding director of RAW Material Company, a center for art, knowledge and society, based in Dakar, Senegal. Starting with a public lecture on January 25th, Kouoh will spend two weeks as a visiting scholar at Pitt while conducting research for her contribution to the 2018 Carnegie International. “Dig Where You Stand” will present a range of objects selected by Kouoh from across the museum’s collections to reflect on the institution, its history, and coloniality— a contemporary interrogation of which has long guided Kouoh’s work.

“I think of this participation as a conversation between two curators—Ingrid and I—within an institution that has a long-standing history of an exhibition series that is a site of global artistic exchanges. I see this current moment with its political backdrop as an opportunity to have urgent conversations about living in a state of coloniality,” says Kouoh.

To introduce Kouoh’s work to the Pittsburgh community, Institution Building as Curatorial Practice, a free public lecture took place on January 25 at 6:00pm at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium at the University of Pittsburgh. More information can be found here.

Koyo Kouoh is the founding artistic director of RAW Material Company, a center for art, knowledge and society in Dakar, Senegal. She was the curator of  1:54 FORUM, the educational program at the Contemporary African Art Fair in London and New York. She served on the curatorial teams for documenta 12 (2007) and documenta 13 (2012). She most recently launched RAW Académie, an experimental program for artistic thought and curatorial inquiry in Dakar. Besides sustaining theoretical, exhibition, and residency programs at RAW Material Company, she is active internationally as a curator and advisor. She lives and works in Dakar and Basel.

Curated by Ingrid Schaffner, the Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed., 2018 hosted five research trips and research companions in a year of travel leading up to the exhibition. Read more about the research travel here. It was while traveling in West Africa for the Dakar Biennial with Carin Kuoni, Director, The Vera List Center for Art and Politics, The New School, New York, that Schaffner was introduced to Raw Material Company. Of her subsequent invitation to Kouoh to participate in the International, Schaffner says:

“Of the brilliant artists, curators, and teachers who are showing us new ways of seeing history’s narratives and being citizens in the world today, Koyo Kouoh is a leader. What she is doing at Raw Material Company in Dakar models the vital role that cultural institutions everywhere can and must play in shaping civil societies and imagining just futures.”
As a visiting scholar at Pitt, Kouoh will be a graduate seminar guest lecturer. The seminar, taught by Assistant Professor Jennifer Josten, will grant students special insight into Kouoh’s curatorial process for the International. They will learn about the rise of new methodologies of cultural self-representation; consider how museum collections are built; and learn how contemporary presentations and interpretations can add layers or reveal new perspectives.

About the 57th Carnegie International
The International will open on October 13, 2018 and run through March 25, 2019. However, the International is already under way, with expanding research and creative documentation along with a highly crafted curatorial process, public programs, commissioned essays, and immersive site visits.

As the International evolves, stay tuned for news of more artist projects, Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions, Travelogues, and other public programs on cmoa.org and cmoa.org/carnegieintl.

Established in 1896 as the Annual Exhibition, the Carnegie International initially focused almost solely on painting. By 1955, the show had adopted a triennial schedule and, in 1958, it became known as the Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Paintings and Sculpture, a title it retained until 1970. After an interruption in the 1970s, the exhibition resumed in 1977 and 1979 as the International series, single-artist shows intended as a parallel to the Nobel Prize for the arts. In 1982, it reappeared as the Carnegie International, and has been mounted every three to five years since. After the Venice Biennale, the Carnegie International is the oldest international survey exhibition in the world.

Support
Major support for the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018 has been provided by the Carnegie International Endowment, The Fine Foundation, and the Keystone Friends of the 2018 Carnegie International. Additional major support is provided by the Friends of the 2018 Carnegie International, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and the Louisa S. Rosenthal Family Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. To learn more, call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Teenie Harris Photographs: Service and Sacrifice

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) presents Teenie Harris Photographs: Service and Sacrifice, open January 27–May 28, 2018. The exhibition is the latest from CMOA’s Teenie Harris Archive, focusing on Harris’s work documenting the experiences of black soldiers.

Charles "Teenie" Harris, Medic soldier with cross arm band and flag, seated on duffel bag, c. 1930-1950, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Charles “Teenie” Harris, Medic soldier with cross arm band and flag, seated on duffel bag, c. 1930-1950, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

During World War II, Charles “Teenie” Harris photographed thousands of African American soldiers who fought for a nation that didn’t always fight for them. Separated by years of Army service, Master Sergeant Eugene Boyer Jr. and former Staff Sergeant Lance A. Woods have selected 25 Harris images that speak to their experiences—the honor of military service, and the sacrifices that the families of service members make.

In addition, Harris photographed more than 1,000 soldiers in his studio over the course of his career. Many of these portraits remain unidentified. As part of Service and Sacrifice, the Teenie Harris Archive will make a selection of images available, and seek information about these individuals. Visit the exhibition, or contact 412.622.1011 for more information.

Teenie Harris was one of the great photographers of the 20th century, and his body of work stands as one of the most detailed records of the black urban experience. His photographs of service members, as well as of efforts on the home front, tell stories of black soldiers fighting for the American promise of civil liberties, and the opportunity for a better future.

Charles "Teenie" Harris, 'Man wearing military uniform and cap, standing at chalkboard,' c. 1944 , Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Charles “Teenie” Harris, ‘Man wearing military uniform and cap, standing at
chalkboard,’ c. 1944 , Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Charles "Teenie" Harris, 'Woman wearing military uniform, with two other women, and sign in background reading "Can YOU Qualify of the WAC or the WAF?"' c. 1949, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Charles “Teenie” Harris, ‘Woman wearing military uniform, with two other women, and sign in background reading “Can YOU Qualify of the WAC or the WAF?”‘ c. 1949, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Curators’ Statements

“During World War II, this country was segregated. If you were a black draftee, you in most cases went to the South to be trained in the South. Your officers were mostly white and mostly Southern, and they were picked because of their Southern background, because it was assumed that they knew how to handle you. There were times when the enemy was nicer than the person who commanded you.

“Today, I would recommend any of our military services to a young black person looking for a career. It’s not easy. It calls for a lot of dedication, concentration, and a love of country. But this is America. This is all our home.”

–Eugene Boyer Jr.

 

“Harris preserves the legacy of black patriotism in Pittsburgh during a time of visible discrimination. His lens permits us to witness the valor and sacrifice of black women and men in our military.

“Working on this exhibit, I tried to put myself in the shoes of black patriots who served during the Jim Crow era. I questioned whether their sacrifice for America afforded them any of its fundamental protections and promises. I questioned how they endured the indignity of being a “solider” abroad but a “boy” at home. Most of all, I questioned how they reconciled their allegiance to America with its long, violent history of subjugating black citizens.

“Nearly 70 years after President Truman desegregated the armed forces, these questions still cause a personal rift. When loyalties to my heritage and my veteran status threaten to tear me apart, I am empowered by the perseverance and triumphs of black patriots who served before me. Listening to veterans like Mr. Boyer and my grandfather, Sidney Ivory, I learn that my pride in my heritage is not compromised by a willingness to serve my country.”

–Lance A. Woods

Teenie Harris Photographs: Service and Sacrifice is guest-curated by Eugene Boyer Jr. and Lance A. Woods, in collaboration with Dominique Luster, Teenie Harris Archivist.

Support
The Teenie Harris Archive at Carnegie Museum of Art is generously supported by the Richard King Mellon Foundation.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
CMOA creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. We believe that creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world in order to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art announces its first major exhibition of its 1750–1850 holdings, Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye. The exhibition packs CMOA’s Heinz Galleries with over 200 popular and never-before-seen works. It shares artist’s visions of a world rapidly becoming modern, and shaped by explosive debates: Does religion have a role in public life? Should we redistribute wealth to the poor? Can women fully participate in democracy? Can public education produce good citizens? All remain hot-button issues today.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye
March 3–June 24, 2018
Heinz Galleries

Ary Scheffer, 'Faust in His Study,' c. 1831, watercolor and gouache on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Fishkoff

Ary Scheffer, ‘Faust in His Study,’ c. 1831, watercolor and gouache on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Fishkoff

Between 1750–1850, the world changed dramatically. Revolutions toppled monarchies, and constitutional democracy took root in the US and France. This was a time of accelerating ideas on liberty and equality challenging social norms. People began to behave in ways we’d recognize today. Portraits depict their subjects in classical costume, just as we would carefully style an Instagram profile or digital avatar. Gorgeous painted fans could send quick messages, signaling romance from across the room. Celebrities behaved badly and artists captured every single episode.

The Enlightenment was a time of reason and order. Scientific breakthroughs and new ways of governing stimulated optimism for making the world better. A portrait by George Romney, ca. 1779–1780, shows an idealized image of his subject in classical garments and pose. An Edward Hicks painting from 1837 depicts a peaceful gathering of European colonists and Native Americans, alongside a menagerie of coexisting animals, a utopian vision of a young United States. Subjects like global trade, scientists at work, and a new recognition of non-Western cultures crept into art.

Edward Hicks, 'The Peaceable Kingdom,' c. 1837, oil on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Bequest of Charles J. Rosenbloom

Edward Hicks, ‘The Peaceable Kingdom,’ c. 1837, oil on canvas, Carnegie Museum of Art, Bequest of Charles J. Rosenbloom

The Romantics challenged notions of rational, orderly societies. Watching as the noble ideals of the French Revolution ended in violent chaos, the Romantics championed emotions and individuals. Miniature portraits of lovers were worn inside of clothes and out of sight. Ary Scheffer’s 1851 masterwork depicts the swirling shades of entwined lovers Francesca and Rimini from Dante’s Inferno. In Caspar David Friedrich’s 1803 print, a forlorn woman contemplates suicide.

Research and restoration projects have yielded several never-before-shown works. Combined with new acquisitions and longtime gallery favorites, the exhibition tells a story of this sensational century. Quotes from writers of the time contextualize the art on view.

Through painting, sculpture, furniture, prints, drawings, and personal objects, The Enlightened Eye shows a Western world in tension between rational order and chaotic abandon. This was one of the most fascinating times in our history, and CMOA invites you to view our world through their eyes.

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye is organized by Louise Lippincott, curator of fine art, with additional support from Rachel Delphia and Margaret Powell, department of decorative arts and design.

Support
Generous support for this exhibition is provided by The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, the Richard C. von Hess Foundation, the Gailliot Family Foundation, and Ritchie Battle. Additional support is provided by the Mary Louise and Henry J. Gailliot Fund for Exhibitions, the Martin G. McGuinn Art Exhibition Fund, Martha Malinzak, and The European Fine Art Foundation.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
CMOA creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. We believe that creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world in order to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Iconic series by master Japanese Print Maker coming to CMOA

First-edition prints of Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road will be on view for the first time in 25 years

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road
March 31–July 8, 2018
Gallery One

Pittsburgh…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces a new exhibition of one of the most celebrated works of Japanese art, the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido by master printmaker Utagawa (Andō) Hiroshige. The series depicts the spectacular landscapes and interesting characters encountered along the journey from Edo (now Tokyo) to the imperial capital Kyoto. Central to the exhibition are CMOA’s prints from the first Hōeidō edition; 55 in total, created between 1831 and 1834. This will be the first time in 25 years that the entire series has been on view at the museum.

The Tokaido road was the most heavily-traveled route between these two important cities, figuring heavily into popular Japanese art and culture in the mid-1800s. Hiroshige made hundreds of images on the subject throughout his career.

Visitors can follow the progress of the journey along the gallery walls, moving from location to location. In a unique twist, visitors will see examples from Hiroshige’s other series on Tokaido—Reisho, Gyosho, Kichizo, and Aritaya editions—to illustrate the artist’s varied approach to the same subject and innovations of vantage point, perspective, and scale. The exhibition will also feature multiple impressions of the same Hōeidō print to demonstrate variations in the color woodblock printing process, stressing the uniqueness of each singular impression. Different representations of the same station will branch out from the main “path” of the Hōeidō set.

Two different impressions of the same print

Hiroshige Andō, 'Mishima,' c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, ‘Mishima,’ c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, 'Mishima,' c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, ‘Mishima,’ c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

“We’re very fortunate to have an amazing collection of Japanese prints at CMOA” said curator Akemi May. “Having Hiroshige in such depth allows us to nerd-out a little and talk about what makes a good print versus a great print. Their sensitivity to light makes them difficult to display year-round, so this will be quite a treat our visitors will surely love.”

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road is organized by Akemi May, Assistant Curator of Fine Art at CMOA.

Support
Major support for this exhibition is provided by the E. Rhodes & Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Bernard S. and Barbara F. Mars Art Exhibition Endowment.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.