Media Archive: 2018 Exhibitions

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Iconic series by master Japanese Print Maker coming to CMOA

First-edition prints of Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road will be on view for the first time in 25 years

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road
March 24–July 8, 2018
Gallery One

Pittsburgh…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces a new exhibition of one of the most celebrated works of Japanese art, the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido by master printmaker Utagawa (Andō) Hiroshige. The series depicts the spectacular landscapes and interesting characters encountered along the journey from Edo (now Tokyo) to the imperial capital Kyoto. Central to the exhibition are CMOA’s prints from the first Hōeidō edition; 55 in total, created between 1831 and 1834. This will be the first time in 25 years that the entire series has been on view at the museum.

The Tokaido road was the most heavily-traveled route between these two important cities, figuring heavily into popular Japanese art and culture in the mid-1800s. Hiroshige made hundreds of images on the subject throughout his career.

Visitors can follow the progress of the journey along the gallery walls, moving from location to location. In a unique twist, visitors will see examples from Hiroshige’s other series on Tokaido—Reisho, Gyosho, Kichizo, and Aritaya editions—to illustrate the artist’s varied approach to the same subject and innovations of vantage point, perspective, and scale. The exhibition will also feature multiple impressions of the same Hōeidō print to demonstrate variations in the color woodblock printing process, stressing the uniqueness of each singular impression. Different representations of the same station will branch out from the main “path” of the Hōeidō set.

Two different impressions of the same print

Hiroshige Andō, 'Mishima,' c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, ‘Mishima,’ c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, 'Mishima,' c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

Hiroshige Andō, ‘Mishima,’ c. 1833-1834, woodblock print on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Austin

“We’re very fortunate to have an amazing collection of Japanese prints at CMOA” said curator Akemi May. “Having Hiroshige in such depth allows us to nerd-out a little and talk about what makes a good print versus a great print. Their sensitivity to light makes them difficult to display year-round, so this will be quite a treat our visitors will surely love.”

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road is organized by Akemi May, Assistant Curator of Fine Art at CMOA.

Support
Support for this exhibition is provided by the Bernard S. and Barbara F. Mars Art Exhibition Endowment.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed., 2018 Announces its Commitment to Fair Pay for Participating Artists

December 5, 2017

Contacts:

Justin Conner
Justin@hellothirdeye.com
917.609.8499

Jonathan Gaugler
gauglerj@cmoa.org
412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

 

The International is the first biennial-style exhibition to be certified by W.A.G.E., an artist activist organization

Pittsburgh, PA. – Carnegie Museum of Art is pleased to announce that the Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed.,2018, has been certified by W.A.G.E. (Working Artists and the Greater Economy) as meeting its standards for paying artist fees. The International is the first biennial-style exhibition to become W.A.G.E. Certified. Accordingly, every participating artist or collective will be paid a standard minimum fee—set by W.A.G.E.-for providing content to the exhibition.

As curator Ingrid Schaffner says, “Perhaps the most entrenched barrier to greater equity is the idea that art is a privilege. W.A.G.E.’s activism brings recognition to the work artists do—on top of actually making art!-when they provide content for museums and exhibitions.”

W.A.G.E. is a New York-based activist organization which works to draw attention to economic inequalities that exist in the arts, and to resolve them. W.A.G.E. Certification is a national program that publicly recognizes those nonprofit arts organizations demonstrating a history of, and commitment to, voluntarily paying artist fees that meet minimum payment standards. W.A.G.E. launched its certification program in October of 2014 and has since certified fifty organizations across the U.S.

The Carnegie International’s certification marks an important exception to W.A.G.E.’s own rules.  In a statement from W.A.G.E.: “One of W.A.G.E. Certification’s cardinal rules is that we don’t certify single exhibitions…However, because museums have demonstrated the greatest resistance…we have chosen to bend this rule and approach the reform of large art institutions brick by brick.” W.A.G.E. sees this certification as an important step forward for the cultural field at large: “While this may sound relatively inconsequential, it isn’t. The Carnegie Int’l, 57th ed., 2018’s decision to guarantee evenly distributed remuneration is a rebuke of speculation as a form of payment in the nonprofit sector. It is also an affirmation of art’s value as a common good – one to which both the labor of artists and institutions contribute, and which both must collectively work to maintain.”

To read W.A.G.E.’s full statement on the certification of the Carnegie International, follow this link.

About the 57th Carnegie International
The International will open on October 12, 2018 and run through March 25, 2019. However, the International is already under way, with expanding research and creative documentation along with a highly-crafted schedule of programs, commissioned essays, and participating artists coming to Pittsburgh for immersive visits.

In this spirit of approaching the International as an evolving process, the curators and participating artists have had ongoing discussions about the purpose of such large-format exhibitions. The International is working with the artists to create an exhibition that puts forward a more sustainable model to boost the ability for artistic production and buoy the creative ecosystem among museum, artist, and public.

As the International evolves, stay tuned for news of more artist projects, Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions, Travelogues, and talks on cmoa.org and the International website.

Find CMOA on Facebook at facebook.com/carnegiemuseumofart, on Twitter at @cmoa, or on Instagram at @thecmoa.

About the Carnegie International
Established in 1896 as the Annual Exhibition, the Carnegie International was initially held every fall (with few exceptions) and focused almost solely on painting. By 1955, the show had adopted a triennial schedule and, in 1958, it became known as the Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Paintings and Sculpture, a title it retained until 1970. After an interruption in the 1970s, the exhibition resumed in 1977 and 1979 as the International Series, single-artist shows intended as a parallel to the Nobel Prize for the arts. In 1982, it reappeared under its original triennial survey format as the Carnegie International, and has been mounted every three to five years since. After the Venice Biennale, the Carnegie International is the oldest international survey exhibition in the world.

Support
Major support for the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018 has been provided by the Carnegie International Endowment, The Fine Foundation, and the Keystone Friends of the 2018 Carnegie International. Additional major support is provided by the Friends of the 2018 Carnegie International, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and the Louisa S. Rosenthal Family Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

CMOA Announces 2018 Exhibition Schedule

November 15, 2017

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.688.8690 | 412.216.7909

 

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces its 2018 schedule of special exhibitions, including the Carnegie International, 57th edition, 2018, the museum’s signature contemporary art show. Other presentations include new photography by Deana Lawson, a unique hang of master Japanese printmaker Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road series, and a major exhibition of CMOA’s neo-classical and neo-romantic works.

 

Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018
October 12, 2018–March 25, 2019

Established in 1896, the Carnegie International is where the contemporary happens. It signals debuts, ambitious installations, live performances, and site-specific works by artists from around the world, making this exhibition an immersive experience of art today.

Curated by Ingrid Schaffner, the 57th edition will culminate three years of travel and research, publications and programs. It saturates the entire museum, making it a place for visitors to move through and to be with art and one another.

Stay tuned for more stories of artist visits, Travelogues, and Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions, led by participants in the International.

 

Teenie Harris Photographs: Service and Sacrifice
January 27–May 28, 2018
Lobby Gallery

During World War II, Charles “Teenie” Harris documented thousands of African American soldiers who fought for a nation that didn’t always fight for them. Separated by over years of Army service, Master Sergeant Eugene Boyer Sr. and former Staff Sergeant Lance A. Woods have selected 25 Harris images that speak to their experiences—the honor of military service, and the sacrifices that the families of service members make.

Teenie Harris was one of the great photographers of the 20th century, and his body of work stands as one of the most detailed records of the black urban experience. His photographs of service members, as well as of efforts on the home front, tell stories of black soldiers fighting for the American promise of civil liberties, and the opportunity for a better future.

Teenie Harris Photographs: Service and Sacrifice is guest-curated by Eugene Boyer Sr. and Lance A. Woods, in collaboration with Dominique Luster, Teenie Harris Archivist.

 

Visions of Order and Chaos: The Enlightened Eye
March 3–June 24
Heinz Galleries

Through painting, sculpture, furniture, prints, drawings, and personal objects, Visions of Order and Chaos shows a Western world in tension between rational order and chaotic abandon. The exhibition is the first major survey of CMOA’s 1750–1850 collections. During this time, the world changed dramatically. Revolutions toppled monarchies, and constitutional democracy took root in the US and France. This was a time of explosive changes, with accelerating ideas on liberty and equality challenging social norms.

Research and restoration projects have yielded several never-before-shown works. Combined with new acquisitions and longtime gallery favorites, the exhibition tells a story of this sensational century. This was one of the most fascinating times in our history, and CMOA invites you to view our world through their eyes.

Visions of Order and Chaos is organized by Louise Lippincott, Curator of Fine Art, and Rachel Delphia, The Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design.

 

Deana Lawson
March 15–July 15, 2018
Forum 80

Photographer Deana Lawson (b. 1979) addresses critical issues surrounding representations of African Americans and the African diaspora. No other photographer working today depicts the black figure so directly and sensitively. Many of Lawson’s sitters are strangers that she encounters in her everyday life and then photographs in intimate settings.  For this solo exhibition, Lawson expands her artistic practice with new and experimental methods of installation.  By applying her own photographs as well as appropriated images directly to the museum walls without frames, Lawson will heighten the immediacy of her work and invite audiences to consider urgent questions of race and representation.

Deana Lawson is organized by Dan Leers, Curator of Photography.

 

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road
March 24–July 8, 2018
Gallery One

Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido by master printmaker Utagawa (Andō) Hiroshige depicts the spectacular landscapes and interesting characters encountered along the journey from Edo (now Tokyo) to the imperial capital Kyoto. Central to the exhibition are CMOA’s prints from the first Hōeidō edition; 55 in total, created between 1831 and 1834. This will be the first time in 25 years that the entire series has been on view at the museum.

In a unique twist, visitors will see examples from Hiroshige’s other series on Tokaido to illustrate the artist’s varied approach to the same subject and innovations of vantage point, perspective, and scale. And, multiple impressions of the same Hōeidō print will demonstrate variations in the color woodblock printing process.

Hiroshige’s Tokaido Road is organized by Akemi May, Associate Curator of Fine Art.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. The programs of the Heinz Architectural Center are made possible by the generosity of the Drue Heinz Trust. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

Carnegie Museum of Art Announces the Opening Date of the 57th Carnegie International

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 20, 2017

Justin Conner
Justin@hellothirdeye.com
917.609.8499

Jonathan Gaugler
gauglerj@cmoa.org
412.688.8690 / 412.216.7909

Carnegie International to Open October 12, 2018

Programming and Artist Site Visits Happening Now

Thaddeus Mosley, Art Labor with Joan Jonas, and Mimi Cherono Ng’ok announced as participating artists

Pittsburgh, PA… Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) is pleased to announce that the Carnegie International, 57th edition, 2018, curated by Ingrid Schaffner, will open October 12, 2018, and run through March 25, 2019. However, the International is already under way, with expanding research and creative documentation along with a highly-crafted schedule of programs, commissioned essays, and participating artists coming to Pittsburgh for immersive visits. As part of Schaffner’s interest in making the research process accessible and evolving. New York-based design firm Project Projects has built an online portal for the International, at cmoa.org/carnegieintl.

The Carnegie International online portal serves as a living, accumulating document, where viewers can read Travelogues by writer and critic Emmanuel Iduma and artist Maira Kalman, based on the research trips taken by Schaffner. The Travelogues make visible the spirit of research and travel leading up to the International, inviting writers to add their own voice, interpretation, and experience to the process. Future Travelogues by Pico Iyer, among others, will be added in the coming months, each chronicling Schaffner’s travels with a curator companion to a region he or she had never visited before. The companions were Doryun Chong, Chief Curator at M+, Hong Kong; Ruba Katrib, Curator of SculptureCenter, New York; Carin Kuoni, Director of the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, The New School, New York; Bisi Silva, Founder and Artistic Director of the Centre for Contemporary Art, Lagos; and Magalí Arriola, a Mexico City-based independent curator.

“I was thinking about the Carnegie Museums’ identity as a research institute, and thought that offered a useful model,” said Schaffner. “The colleagues I traveled with are not co-curators but thinking partners. By supporting their work in the field, the International has helped build new networks of artists and curators around the world.”

Back in Pittsburgh, Tam O’Shanter Drawing Sessions have begun. In a nod to the heritage of founder Andrew Carnegie (a tam-o’-shanter is a traditional Scottish beret), CMOA has held these art classes for young people since 1929. Schaffner has retuned the format to create a programmatic thread leading up to and throughout the exhibition.  The public programs are conducted by artists and organizers of the International, who connect their work and participants through improvisational acts of drawing. Each session is unique. Skill is not required to map, mark, doodle, render, cartoon, write, or otherwise participate in these open-ended gatherings. This program underscores Schaffner’s commitment to unpacking the history of the International as an evolving exhibition concept.

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