Carnegie Museum of Art Announces Exhibitions and Programming for January–June

Contact
Emily Willson
Carnegie Museum of Art
willsone@cmoa.org
412.622.3328

Pittsburgh, PA (January 9, 2019) Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces four new exhibitions, dynamic social programming, and engaging educational opportunities for 2019. The exhibitions represent a wide range of artistic styles and periods, from decorative arts and design and contemporary art to classic Impressionism favorites.

“I’m proud of the variety this year,” says Henry H.J. Heinz II Acting Co-Director Catherine Evans. “They show the dynamic and varied experiences you can have at a museum—from seeing Ruth Root’s fabulous patterns to studying the serial painting techniques of Monet to learning about the latest breakthroughs in accessibility design. Museums should be a place for discovery and inspiration, and I think 2019 embodies that spirit.”

New Exhibitions

Ruth Root

April 19–August 25
Forum Gallery

The 81st installment of CMOA’s Forum series will debut a new body of work by acclaimed New York–based painter Ruth Root. For the last two decades, Root has fashioned unruly paintings that push the boundaries of the medium and delight in the pleasures of pattern and shape. For this new series, curator Eric Crosby invited Root to mine CMOA’s collection of artworks and design objects as inspiration for her digitally printed fabrics, which suspend irregular sheets of painted plastic. Through a visual dialogue with the museum’s collection, her eye-popping works personify the wonder of painting.

Ruth Root, digital fabric design for Untitled, 2017; Image courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Ruth Root, digital fabric design for Untitled, 2017; Image courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Influencers: The Pritzker Architecture Prize

May 4–September 2
Heinz Architectural Center

Since its establishment in 1979, the Pritzker Architecture Prize has become the most esteemed prize in architecture worldwide; awarded to individual architects for their total body of work, the Pritzker is frequently referred to as the Nobel Prize for Architecture. To mark the prize’s 40th anniversary, Raymund Ryan, curator, Heinz Architectural Center, presents work from the museum’s collection done by Pritzker laureates. Bolstered by several recent acquisitions, these drawings, models, furniture, and photographs are presented in collaboration with the annual summer camp to stimulate the imaginations of museum visitors and camp participants alike.

Hans Hollein, Stadtstruktur (City Structure), 1959, ink on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. 2018.23.

Hans Hollein, Stadtstruktur (City Structure), 1959, ink on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. 2018.23.

Monet and the Modern City

May 25–September 2
Gallery One

Monet and his contemporaries responded to the urban industrial landscape through works that convey the power and promise of modernization. Organized by curator Akemi May, this exhibition contextualizes Monet’s famous Waterloo Bridge series with other artists’ work from the time, exploring Monet’s process of serial painting and the enduring theme of industry in art. Carnegie Museum of Art’s own Waterloo Bridge painting is presented alongside two others from the series, thanks to the Worcester Art Museum and the Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, and captures the range of moods and colors that serial painting can produce. Other notable works include pieces by Camille Pissarro, Jean-Emile Laboureur, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler, which provide a broader frame of reference for the urban industrial landscape as subject.

Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, London, 1903, Carnegie Museum of Art. Acquired through the generosity of the Sarah Mellon Scaife Family. 67.2

Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, London, 1903, Carnegie Museum of Art.
Acquired through the generosity of the Sarah Mellon Scaife Family. 67.2

Access+Ability

June 1–October 6, 2019
Heinz Galleries

Access+Ability highlights some of the extraordinary research and designs developed during the past decade with and by people who span a wide range of physical, cognitive, and sensory abilities. Fueled by demand and advances in research and digital technologies, a proliferation of functional, life-enhancing products is creating unprecedented access. Low-tech designs that assist with daily routines, digital technology like eye-tracking devices for communicating and editing, and sensors that stabilize tremors associated with Parkinson’s disease, plus innovations in all-terrain wheelchairs, are augmenting the potential for people to access the world in ways previously unimaginable. These objects—many of which are still in prototype stage—represent the future of accessibility design.

Access+Ability was organized by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. The CMOA presentation of Access+Ability is organized by Rachel Delphia, the Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design.

Earring Aid, Bedazzled, 2014. Designed by Elana Langer. Swarovski crystals, e6000 glue, hearing aid. Gift of Elana Langer. Photo: © Hanna Agar.

Earring Aid, Bedazzled, 2014. Designed by Elana Langer. Swarovski crystals, e6000 glue, hearing aid. Gift of Elana Langer. Photo: © Hanna Agar.

Ongoing and Educational

Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018.

Open through March 25
Presented by Bank of America

The second-oldest exhibition of global art, the Carnegie International opened with excitement in October of last year. This sprawling show, which permeates the museum’s exhibition spaces and reaches into its collection galleries, sees its final three months arrive with a variety of activities: visiting artist lectures by Jeremy Deller, Ulrike Müller, and Thaddeus Mosley; a Tam O’Shanter Drawing Session with Beverly Semmes; a Sound Series concert produced by Josiah McElheny, John Corbett, and Jim Dempsey with the Andy Warhol Museum; and drawing sessions with Yuji Agematsu and Tavares Strachan. See the works of Carnegie Prize–winner Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and Fine Prize–winners Postcommodity before the exhibition closes in March.

Social Programs

Ongoing

People engage with art on many levels. The social programming at CMOA aims to bring new faces into the museum and create opportunities for discovery and inspiration. These programs range from the FEAST dinner series—which pairs a local chef with a theme from the Carnegie International for a unique dining experience—to monthly Third Thursday, a themed 18+ event that invites local artists and vendors to create programming relevant to the current exhibitions. An important piece of the museum’s mission of connecting people to art, ideas, and one another, social programs offer an avenue to build engagement and respond to the community.

Summer Camps

June 10–August 16

Following a winter and spring of educational programming, including the exhibition of work by students from The Art Connection, the museum will launch a full calendar of summer camps. Camps offer a unique opportunity to dive deeper into all aspects of art-making, creativity, and collaboration through week-long programs. As part of the museum’s ongoing mission of educating and inspiring, summer camps provide the structure and materials for young people to engage their own creative process. Using the museum’s collection as a resource, campers of all levels and abilities explore through classic and modern art techniques, styles, and practices.


Our Mission

Carnegie Museum of Art creates experiences that connect people to art, ideas, and one another.
We believe creativity is a defining human characteristic to which everyone should have access. CMOA collects, preserves, and presents artworks from around the world to inspire, sustain, and provoke discussion, and to engage and reflect multiple audiences.

Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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