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CMOA Announces 2017 Exhibitions

Contact: Jonathan Gaugler | gauglerj@cmoa.org | 412.216.7909

Exceptional contemporary art, architecture, fashion, & photography

Pittsburgh, PA…Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces its schedule of special exhibitions for 2017. From one of the world’s most acclaimed fashion designers to a polymath image-maker from the dawn of photography, CMOA brings exceptional art from around the world to Pittsburgh. Our contemporary program includes newly commissioned work from artists testing technological boundaries with simulated environments, and paintings born of digital drawings. This summer, we also present a special collaboration with the Studio Museum in Harlem. The Heinz Architectural Center presents the dynamic work of Pittsburgh architect Arthur Lubetz, and tests new methods like virtual reality and robotics to explore a grand old space, the Hall of Architecture.

Visit cmoa.org/calendar to keep up with our exhibitions and programs as they develop.

Teenie Harris Photographs: Erroll Garner and Jazz from The Hill
December 17, 2016–February 26, 2017
Lobby Gallery & August Wilson Center for African American Culture

Charles "Teenie" Harris, James "Honey Boy" Minor on percussion, Joe Westray on electric guitar, Erroll Garner behind piano, and George "Ghost" Howell on bass, on stage of Harlem Casino (detail), ca. 1939–1940, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Charles “Teenie” Harris, James “Honey Boy” Minor on percussion, Joe Westray on electric guitar, Erroll Garner behind piano, and George “Ghost” Howell on bass, Harlem Casino, ca. 1939–1940, Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz Family Fund

Pittsburgh was a hub for jazz in the 20th century, and photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris (1908–1998) seemed to capture every electrifying show. Teenie Harris Photographs: Erroll Garner and Jazz from the Hill features the work of two iconic Pittsburgh artists: Harris, and pianist and composer Erroll Garner, curated by Grammy-nominated jazz musician Geri Allen.

The exhibition spans two locations, CMOA (through summer, 2017), and The August Wilson Center for African American Culture (through February 26.

Organized by Carnegie Museum of Art in collaboration with the Erroll Garner Archive, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

 

Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion
February 4–May 1, 2017
Heinz Galleries

Iris van Herpen, “Refinery Smoke,” Dress, July 2008, Untreated woven metal gauze and cow leather, Groninger Museum, 2012.0196, Photo by Bart Oomes, No 6 Studios

Fashion designer Iris van Herpen (Dutch, b. 1984) unites meticulous handcraft, inventive technological solutions, and a striking, futuristic aesthetic. Organized by the High Museum, Atlanta, and Groninger Museum, The Netherlands, Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion presents 15 of her collections across a dizzying range of materials and techniques for her first North American tour.

 

Action, Ideas, Architecture: Arthur Lubetz/Front Studio
March 11–May 22, 2017 + summer micro-show
The Heinz Architectural Center

Sharpsburg Community Library, photo: Ed Massery

Sharpsburg Community Library, photo: Ed Massery

Using bold colors, distinctive geometries, and unconventional approaches to designing spaces, architect Arthur Lubetz imagines and transforms buildings in surprising ways. Discover the work of Lubetz’s 50-year-old architectural practice, which operates today as Front Studio in Pittsburgh and New York. From the vibrant, tilted facade of The Glass Lofts residences in Pittsburgh’s Garfield neighborhood to the sliced and stacked boxes of the Sharpsburg Community Library, these are structures born of provocative ideas about how design can energize our built environment.

 

Shaping a Modern Legacy: Karl and Jennifer Salatka Collect
March 25–October 15, 2017
Gallery One

Ed Ruscha, "Devil Angel," 1988, pigment and acrylic on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Karl Salatka, © Edward Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, “Devil Angel,” 1988, pigment and acrylic on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Karl Salatka, © Edward Ruscha

This exhibition celebrates the generosity of Karl and Jennifer Salatka, who have made generous gifts to CMOA’s collection for the last 15 years, drawing from their impressive holdings of post–World War II art. This exhibition highlights signature works by such acclaimed modern and contemporary artists as Willem de Kooning, Richard Diebenkorn, Jasper Johns, Anselm Kiefer, Roy Lichtenstein, Elizabeth Murray, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha, Frank Stella, and Andy Warhol.

 

Michael Williams
Forum 78
April 21–August 27, 2017
Forum Gallery

Michael Williams, "Bet it All on Twive," 2016 Inkjet, colored pencil, acrylic and oil on canvas, Copyright Michael Williams Courtesy of the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Michael Williams, “Bet it All on Twive,” 2016, Inkjet, colored pencil, acrylic and oil on canvas, Copyright Michael Williams, Courtesy of the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Combining painting, airbrushing, and inkjet printing, the monumental canvases of Michael Williams (b. 1978) achieve an unusual balance of the familiar and the strange, the digital and the hand-drawn. His dense compositions, which reveal a dark sense of humor about painting and everyday life, often begin as drawings on the computer screen before they are printed and painted. For this, his first U.S. solo museum exhibition, Williams will present a new group of canvasses and a selection of drawings.

 

20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art
July 15–December 31, 2017
Heinz Galleries

Founded in 1968, the Studio Museum in Harlem is internationally known for its catalytic role in promoting the works of artists of African descent and for its dynamic exchange of ideas about art and society. In a unique collaboration, CMOA’s Eric Crosby and the Studio Museum’s Amanda Hunt present selections from their respective collections in dialogue. These artworks have the power to shape a vital conversation about the polarizing issues of race and economic inequality in America today. Featuring 20 artists from each collection, 20/20 also suggests a test of our collective vision, as museums across the nation reconsider their relevance to local communities and rethink their collecting practices in light of marginalized art histories.

 

Ian Cheng
Forum 79
September 22, 2017–January 28, 2018
Forum Gallery

Ian Cheng, "Emissary Forks At Perfection," 2015–2016, live simulation and story, infinite duration, Courtesy the artist, Pilar Corrias, and Standard (Oslo)

Ian Cheng, “Emissary Forks At Perfection,” 2015–2016, live simulation and story, infinite duration, Courtesy the artist, Pilar Corrias, and Standard (Oslo)

Ian Cheng (b. 1984) is best known for his digital simulation works that draw on his background in cognitive science and employ rudimentary forms of artificial intelligence. Coding these unpredictable animated worlds from the ground up, he uses the language of video games to probe complex themes such as evolution, human behavior, and the history of consciousness. For his solo exhibition at CMOA, Cheng will present a new body of work.

 

William Henry Fox Talbot and the Promise of Photography
Fall 2017
Gallery One

William Henry Fox Talbot, "Black Cherry Leaves," likely 1839, photogenic drawing negative, 7 1/4 x 9 in. (image/paper), The William T. Hillman Collection

William Henry Fox Talbot, “Black Cherry Leaves,” likely 1839, photogenic drawing negative, 7 1/4 x 9 in. (image/paper), The William T. Hillman Collection

Using his knowledge of art, botany, chemistry, and optics, William Henry Fox Talbot (British, 1800–1877) invented a means of turning an ordinary piece of paper into “photogenic drawings,” calotypes, and salted paper prints in 1839. Featuring more than 30 works, many of which have never before been shown, the exhibition will provide visitors a glimpse into the earliest days of photography. This is the largest exhibition of Talbot’s work in a North American museum in nearly 15 years, and the first show ever in Pittsburgh to present these important photographs from the dawn of the medium.

 

HACLab: Hall of Architecture
Fall 2017–Spring 2018
Hall of Architecture / The Heinz Architectural Center

Hall of Architecture, Carnegie Museum of Art, Photo: Tom Little

Hall of Architecture, Carnegie Museum of Art, Photo: Tom Little

The Hall of Architecture is CMOA’s grandest space, packed with nearly 150 plaster casts of architectural facades and fragments, most from across Europe. In 1907, Andrew Carnegie assembled this collection to bring the world to Pittsburgh for those who couldn’t afford to travel, but how should we use this amazing resource in the internet age? This HACLab, a project of CMOA’s Heinz Architectural Center, collaborates with software developers, roboticists, historians, and designers to envision new ways of using this amazing collection. Our visitors will be the first to try out the ideas that emerge from this process of experimentation, ultimately shaping new ways of experiencing and interpreting the Hall of Architecture.

Support
General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art enriches people’s lives through art. The museum is committed to global engagement and regional advancement. We champion creativity and its importance to society with experiences that welcome, inspire, challenge, and inform. Our core activities—collecting, conserving, presenting, and interpreting works of art—make those experiences possible. Our world-class collection of over 30,000 works emphasizes art, architecture, photography, and design from the 19th century to the present. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Learn more: call 412.622.3131 or visit cmoa.org.

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