Edward Hopper; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926; watercolor over charcoal on paper; Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal; Carnegie Museum of Art

CMOA exhibition showcases its entire Hopper collection

CMOA Collects Edward Hopper
July 25–October 26, 2015
Gallery One

Edward Hopper; Sailing, 1911; oil on canvas; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal in honor of the Sarah Scaife Gallery; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

Edward Hopper; Sailing, 1911; oil on canvas; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal in honor of the Sarah Scaife Gallery; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

In 1913, Edward Hopper sold his first painting at the first Armory Show. But it would be over a decade before the now-famed painter sold another. Instead, Hopper turned to etchings, drawings, and watercolors, finding recognition for his masterful compositions of quiet, meditative moments.

Edward Hopper; Night Shadows, 1921; etching; Leisser Art Fund; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

Edward Hopper; Night Shadows, 1921; etching; Leisser Art Fund; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

CMOA Collects Edward Hopper presents all 17 works by Hopper in the museum’s collection, ranging from impressive examples of his etchings, drawings, and watercolors, to the oil paintings for which he is best known. This includes the first painting Hopper sold, Sailing (1911), and his 1936 painting Cape Cod Afternoon, produced after he gained widespread recognition. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper also presents prints by artists who influenced Hopper during his difficult formative years, including Rembrandt, John Sloan, and Charles Meryon.

Edward Hopper; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936; oil on canvas; Patrons Art Fund; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

Edward Hopper; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936; oil on canvas; Patrons Art Fund; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

Never before exhibited together, the works in CMOA Collects Edward Hopper reveal the development of an iconic American master, and shed light on the influences that produced his instantly recognizable style.

Edward Hopper; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926; watercolor over charcoal on paper; Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal; Carnegie Museum of Art

Edward Hopper; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926; watercolor over charcoal on paper; Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal; Carnegie Museum of Art

CMOA Collects Edward Hopper is organized by Akemi May, associate curator of fine art

Events at Programming

Members Only! Coffee with the Curator
August 6, 2015 / 10:30 a.m.–12 p.m. / $30
10:30–11 a.m. Light breakfast in Carnegie Café
11 a.m.–noon Lecture in CMOA Theater

Edward Hopper is best known for his paintings of urban modern life in the 20th century, but the artist initially found success with etching. This medium proved to be ideal for his bold graphic compositions and humble American subject matter that included rooftops, railroads, buildings, and landscapes. Gain behind-the-scenes insight into CMOA’s Hopper collection with curator Akemi May, who will discuss this important moment in the artist’s career, famous printmakers like Rembrandt who inspired him, and the watercolors that led to his recognition as a painter.

 

Support
Generous support for CMOA Collects Edward Hopper has been provided by Jane C. Arkus, the Virginia Kaufman Fund, and the Bernard and Barbara Mars Art Exhibition Fund.

General operating support for Carnegie Museum of Art is provided by The Heinz Endowments and Allegheny Regional Asset District. Carnegie Museum of Art receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Carnegie Museum of Art
Located at 4400 Forbes Avenue in the Oakland section of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, it is nationally and internationally recognized for its distinguished collection of American and European painting, sculpture, and decorative arts from the 19th century to the present. Founded in 1896, the Carnegie International is one of the oldest surveys of contemporary art worldwide. The Heinz Architectural Center, part of Carnegie Museum of Art, is dedicated to enhancing understand of the built environment through its exhibitions, collections, and public programs. The Hillman Photography Initiative serves as an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image. For more information about Carnegie Museum of Art, call 412.622.3131 or visit our website at www.cmoa.org.

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