Rodney Graham;
Phonokinetoscope, 2001;
16mm film installation with modified turntable and 33 1/3 RPM vinyl LP; Film: 5 min., vinyl record: 14 min.; dimensions variable; A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund

CMOA Announces Final 2013 Carnegie International Acquisitions

Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) announces its third and final round of acquisitions of contemporary art by 2013 Carnegie International artists, including major works by Lara Favaretto, Rodney Graham, Pierre Leguillon, Kamran Shirdel, Taryn Simon, Mladen Stilinović, and Zoe Strauss. The museum’s collection has been shaped in significant ways by International exhibitions since 1896, and purchases from the 2013 Carnegie International represent an especially ambitious effort. The museum has acquired a total of 124 artworks by 27 of the exhibition’s 35 artists—both works that were part of the exhibition, as well as other important works by International artists.

To view previous acquisitions from the 2013 Carnegie International, please read our announcements from December 2013 and February 2014.

A number of new and recent acquisitions are currently on view as part of Outtakes, a presentation of major works by International artists that were not included in the exhibition: Rodney Graham’s Phonokinetoscope, Pierre Leguillon’s Arbus Bonus, Joel Sternfeld’s photographs from his American Prospects series, and photographs from Zoe Strauss’s I-95 series. Other recently acquired works hang in the galleries, including Untitled by Wade Guyton, That Was Then by Henry Taylor, and Taryn Simon’s CHAPTER XVII, A Living Main Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII. They will be joined in September by photographs from Zanele Muholi’s Faces and Phases, Aria’s Salon by Nicole Eisenman, works by Mladen Stilinović, and Locating Centers by Sadie Benning, becoming a part of the larger story told by CMOA’s exceptional collection of contemporary art.

The Artworks:

Lara Favaretto
Italian, b. 1973
Jestem, 2013
4 confetti cubes
dimensions variable
The Henry L. Hillman Fund

Lara Favaretto; Jestem, 2013; 4 confetti cubes, dimensions variable; The Henry L. Hillman Fund

Lara Favaretto; Jestem, 2013; 4 confetti cubes,
dimensions variable; The Henry L. Hillman Fund

One of our visitors’ most loved and discussed works from the 2013 Carnegie International, Lara Favaretto’s sculpture Jestem invites wonder and myriad associations. The four cubes of compressed confetti, each weighing hundreds of pounds, perfectly capture the combination of spectacle, danger, and collapse that are at the heart of Favaretto’s important practice. This work, made especially for CMOA, disintegrates over the duration of its display, only to be reformed and shown again.

Rodney Graham
Canadian, b. 1949
Phonokinetoscope, 2001
16mm film installation with modified turntable and 33 1/3 RPM vinyl LP
AP 1 from an edition of 4 + 2 APs
Film: 5 min., vinyl record: 14 min.
dimensions variable
A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund

Rodney Graham; Phonokinetoscope, 2001; 16mm film installation with modified turntable and 33 1/3 RPM vinyl LP; Film: 5 min., vinyl record: 14 min.; dimensions variable; A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund

Rodney Graham; Phonokinetoscope, 2001; 16mm film installation with modified turntable and 33 1/3 RPM vinyl LP; Film: 5 min., vinyl record: 14 min.; dimensions variable; A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund

Rodney Graham’s Phonokinetoscope installation combines a record player and a looping film, producing a strange and beautiful window into the mechanics of perception and the artist’s interior world. In the film—which only starts when a visitor places the needle on the record—the artist rides a bicycle through a Berlin park while tripping on acid. Because the soundtrack can be triggered at any point in the film, image and sound never quite link up, mirroring the disconnection between Graham’s hallucinogenic mind and the calm, quiet park visible to the viewer. Between the film image, music, and the mechanics of their presentation, questions of time, perception, and philosophy circle the idyllic ramble in the park.

 

Pierre Leguillon
French, b. 1969
Arbus Bonus, 2014
256 framed magazine pages, pile of vintage magazines, 11 crates, and captions
dimensions variable
The Henry L. Hillman Fund 

Pierre Leguillon; Arbus Bonus, 2014; 256 framed magazine pages, pile of vintage magazines, 11 crates, and captions; dimensions variable; The Henry L. Hillman Fund

Pierre Leguillon; Arbus Bonus, 2014; 256 framed magazine pages, pile of vintage magazines, 11 crates, and captions; dimensions variable; The Henry L. Hillman Fund

Pierre Leguillon’s artwork-as-exhibition Arbus Bonus encompasses 256 photographs by famed photographer Diane Arbus, bringing together hundreds of published magazine spreads that feature her editorial photography (rather than prints of street photography and the portraiture for which she is best known). Leguillon’s consideration of this major yet overlooked aspect of her oeuvre exposes a fascinating web of allusions and coincidences between image, history, and text. His project makes apparent how significant Arbus has been in defining the images of our popular culture. 

 

Kamran Shirdel
Iranian, b. 1939 

Mirrors (Gli specchi), 1964
35mm film transferred to digital format; black‑and‑white, sound
9:36 min.

Women’s Prison (Nedamatgah), 1965
35mm film transferred to digital format; black‑and‑white, sound
10:32 min.

The Silver Canvas, 1965
35mm film transferred to digital format: black‑and‑white, sound
14:39 min.

The Women’s Quarter (Qaleh), 1966–1980
35mm film transferred to digital format; black‑and‑white, sound
17:19 min.

Tehran Is the Capital of Iran  (Tehran Paitakhte Iran Ast), 1966–1979
35mm film transferred to digital format; black‑and‑white, sound
17:21 min.

The Night It Rained (An shab ke barun amad), 1967–1974
35mm film transferred to digital format; black‑and‑white, sound
38:38 min.

Pearls of the Persian Gulf: Dubai, 1975
35mm film transferred to digital format: color, sound
43 min.

Gas, Fire, Wind (Gas, atash, baad), 1984–1986
16mm film transferred to digital format; color, sound
55:37 min.

Genaveh Project, 1986–1988
16mm film transferred to digital format; color, sound
45;02 min.

Wagon Pars, 1987
16mm film transferred to digital format; color, sound
29:09 min.

Cradle of Sun (Gahvareh Khorshid), 2001
video; color, sound
53:16 min.

Solitude Opus, 2001–2002
digital video; color, sound
19 min.

Since the mid-1960s, filmmaker Kamran Shirdel has made bold documentary films that address issues of everyday life, especially in his native Iran. Banned and censored for many years, Shirdel’s extraordinary work has not been widely seen until recently, and achieved a new level of visibility with his inclusion in the 2013 Carnegie International. This group of films represents nearly the entirety of Shirdel’s life’s work, from his surrealistic student work Mirrors through the peak of his subversive documentary period, his subsequent industrial commissions, and his late portrait film, Solitude Opus.

 

Taryn Simon
American, b. 1975
CHAPTER XVII, A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII, 2011
Archival inkjet prints comprised of five components
84 x 241 7/8 in. (213.4 x 614.4 cm) overall
Edition 3/4 + 3 APs
The Henry L. Hillman Fund

Taryn Simon uses photography, text, and graphic design to investigate what we can know and cannot know about an image. A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters explores the process of mapping contemporary human relations through chance, blood, and other components of fate. The work was produced over a four-year period (2008–2011), as is typical of Simon’s approach. Chapter XVII is one of the most written-about and provocative components of the series. Its subject is a group of Ukrainian orphans, united by their lack of discernible bloodline. Well-dressed in jackets, ties, and button-down shirts, these children, ages 6–16, appear in portraits arranged in ordered grid. Simon’s text tells us that the children are allowed to stay at the orphanage (shown in the footnote panel) until age 16, when they are released and become susceptible to targeting “for human trafficking, prostitution, and child pornography.”

 

Mladen Stilinović
Croatian, b. 1947
Potatoes, Potatoes (Krumpira, Krumpira), 2001
video; color, sound
4 min.
Edition 2/6 + 1 AP
Carol R. Brown Acquisition Fund for Contemporary Art

Joining two other works by this 2013 Carnegie International artist already in the collection, Krumpira, Krumpira shows the artist crouching in a snow bank—a peddler in what appears to be a remote wilderness. Repeatedly, he calls out the word krumpira (Croatian for “potato”), though no one is nearby to hear him. The goods stacked on his cardboard box-cum-sales table, however, are not potatoes but thick, square pieces of vanilla cake. Cake is a symbol Stilinović has often used—in his series Geometry of Cakes (1993), for example—to evoke the cynicism of power, referring to the famous phrase allegedly spoken by Marie Antoinette: “If they have no bread, let them eat cake.” With cutting irony and shades of self-deprecating humor, in this video the artist seems to suggest both the cruel absurdity of that sentiment and an attempt to transfigure a symbol of decadence into something common. His meager entrepreneurial endeavor—whether we take him for the hawker he purports to be or the artist he actually is—is revealed as a sham, as selling frivolities under the guise of substance to a nonexistent audience.

 

Zoe Strauss
American, b. 1970

Zoe Strauss; Erica at Work, 2013; From the project Homesteading; archival inkjet print; The Henry L. Hillman Fund

Zoe Strauss; Erica at Work, 2013; From the project Homesteading; archival inkjet print; The Henry L. Hillman Fund

15 photographs from the project Homesteading: 

Mayor Esper on Picket Line, 2013

Jitney Office, 2013

Diane’s Hand, 2013

Deer in Cemetery Where Strikers Are Buried, 2013

Homestead Homes at Sunset, 2013

Homestead Homes at Night, 2013

Erica at Work, 2013

Vendomatic Job Application, 2013

Facebook Status of Homestead Resident, July 12, 2013, 2013

Jet-skiing on the Monongahela, 2013

Ryan on the Homestead Grays Bridge, 2013

Homestead Appliances Bow, 2013

K-9 Call, 2013

West Homestead Homes, 2013

Blast Furnace Matriarchy, 2013

archival inkjet prints
The Henry L. Hillman Fund

For the 2013 Carnegie International, Zoe Strauss lived and an operated a portrait studio in Homestead, PA, a borough just outside of Pittsburgh and former site of Andrew Carnegie’s steelworks. The 215 portraits of neighborhood residents that she gifted to the museum at the close of the exhibition reflect the relationships that she formed during her time there. These street photographs, taken around the neighborhood outside the portrait studio, document some of the first encounters the artist had in Homestead—with characters ranging from the town mayor, Betty “Bo Bo” Esper, and a factory worker named Diane to a shirtless young man on the Homestead Grays Bridge—as well as the homes and businesses that were to become familiar sights over the course of her stay.

Support
Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International, which is co-chaired by Jill and Peter Kraus, Sheila and Milton Fine, and Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann.

The Lozziwurm playground was made possible by a generous gift from Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann.

Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, The Pittsburgh Foundation, Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation, Bessie F. Anathan Charitable Trust of The Pittsburgh Foundation, Wendy Mackenzie, George Foundation, Huntington Bank, The Grable Foundation, Nancy and Woody Ostrow, Betty and Brack Duker, BNY Mellon, and The Broad Art Foundation, and Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield.

 

Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art, founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895, is nationally and internationally recognized for its collection of fine and decorative art from the 19th to 21st centuries. The collection also contains important holdings of Japanese and old master prints. Founded in 1896, the Carnegie International is one of the longest-running surveys of contemporary art worldwide. The Heinz Architectural Center, part of Carnegie Museum of Art, is dedicated to enhancing understanding of the built environment through its exhibitions, collections, and public programs. The Hillman Photography Initiative serves as a living laboratory for exploring the rapidly changing field of photography. For more information about Carnegie Museum of Art, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, call 412.622.3131 or visit our website at www.cmoa.org.